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Mike Robbins
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I recently had the pleasure of interviewing my friend Jonathan Fields on my podcast. We talked about how to live a good life and show up authentically in our work, as fathers, and more. Check out the interview here: ow.ly/hIZR306L14i


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We're All In This Together - my latest blog post, http://mike-robbins.com/were-all-in-this-together/

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This week's episode of my podcast is called We're All In This Together - it's all about the election, the reaction, and what we can do moving forward to speak up, be real, connect, and collaborate, ow.ly/fB1e306c61N

An open letter to my fellow straight white men...

It's time for us to step up straight white men! This campaign and this election have exposed many issues in our country and our world...issues that have been there for a very long time, and although we’ve made progress on them through the years, it’s time for real change and we’re a big part of that.

Being a straight white man, although it comes with an enormous amount of privilege - some of which we’re aware of and much we simply take for granted, can be challenging and painful in certain ways that we rarely talk about. I have spent much of my life feeling (or avoiding) the shame of what white men have done (and are still doing) to women, people of color, members of the LGBTQ community, and those less privileged.

We often don't like to acknowledge this because it feels awful, there doesn't seem to be much we can do about it, and it’s an incredibly painful and powerless experience. It's also scary, uncomfortable, and vulnerable to talk about racism, sexism, homophobia, and oppression of any kind - especially as a straight white man. We usually aren't as aware of it as those who are directly impacted and even when we are, we worry that we shouldn't talk about these things because we may hurt, upset, or offend people...or be judged, misunderstood, shamed, or attacked...called a racist, sexist, or homophobe ourselves. So, we choose to stay oblivious, to avoid it, or just sit on our hands, which is safer and easier.

Many of us have dealt with our own challenges and obstacles in life - just because we’re white, straight, and male, doesn't mean we were born with a silver spoon in our mouth, haven't worked hard, don’t deal with our own issues, or don't deserve any of the success or opportunity we may have experienced. And, yes, some of us have dealt with various forms of "reverse racism" or "reverse sexism" both personally and professionally. We also like to point to the fact that much progress has been made for women, people of color, and other minorities in our culture, which is true. Or we see, hear, and read about horrible acts of hate or abuse and say to ourselves (or others), "I would never do that...I'm one of the good guys."

However, it’s important for us to both acknowledge the privilege and power we have as straight white men and also the responsibility. The vast majority of us are not abusing women, sexually assaulting them, treating them as objects, or consciously trying to hold them back. We're also not overtly racist or homophobic - treating people of color or gay people in rude, cruel, and oppressive ways.

Yet, these things continue to exist in our culture all over the place - and there is so much pain, suffering, fear, and trauma associated with this for so many people in our world right now. Women are being abused, assaulted, and raped all the time - right in our communities and on college campuses. Plus, just about every woman we know has been impacted directly by sexism and even sexual assault - just ask them, as awkward as that may be to bring up. Every person of color and gay person we know has dealt with racism or homophobia in their lives - in many cases in a traumatic way. Unarmed black men are dying in the streets. Muslims are being targeted and taunted. Kids are being bullied in school for being "different." Hatred, cruelty, and oppression are taking place in both big and small ways – even if we don’t see it in our own lives or families regularly.

We just experienced a Presidential campaign and election that was filled with overt and covert racism, sexism, and hatred. I choose to believe that the vast majority of the people who voted for Donald Trump are not racist, sexist, and homophobic. However, his campaign, his rhetoric, and his election have given a sense of permission and “normalcy” to hatred, fear, and discrimination of minorities, immigrants, women, and other groups...and that is NOT okay.

As good, strong, kind, loving, compassionate, and powerful men who love our country, our significant others, our friends, and our children, we have an important role to play in this...even if we may not always see it or feel comfortable with it.

Every straight white man I know has been in situations where other straight white men around us were being overtly or covertly racist, sexist, or homophobic. While we may not have participated in it directly (although in some cases we have, especially when we were young and less conscious), we have often not done or said anything to stop it...or to at least make it clear that it's not okay. We can no longer do this!

For better or worse, people listen to us in a particular way given our race, gender, and orientation. It may not be fair or justified (both positively and negatively), but it's true. And even though it can be scary and uncomfortable, and some people might judge us, think we're arrogant, insensitive, self-righteous, soft, over-sensitive, too PC, or worse, it’s time for us to step up, lean in, speak up, and do more to support the women and girls around us, and our brothers and sisters of color, everyone in the LGBTQ community, Muslims, immigrants, and any oppressed or under-represented group in our culture...i.e. everyone who is not white, not straight, and not male.

We also need to pay more attention, look, listen, and feel with as much awareness, compassion, and empathy as we can. We have to call out racism, sexism, and oppression when we see it - both personally and also in our organizations, institutions, and our society at large. This is not easy or comfortable, and isn't usually encouraged or appreciated by those we may be calling out...but it's essential. Sometimes we’re in a better, safer, and stronger position to call this out than the individuals or groups who are being discriminated against themselves.

This isn't about liberal or conservative, Clinton supporter or Trump supporter, or even about our nation...it’s actually bigger than that...it's about loving, caring for, and supporting our fellow human beings. We are brothers, sons, fathers, grandfathers, uncles, cousins, coaches, mentors, friends, and more. We are men...and at the core of our nature, we are here to provide and protect...that is our job and our responsibility, above and beyond whatever we do for a living.

And, as straight white men, we are in a unique and important position of privilege and power. We can influence change...we can stand up for kindness and compassion...and for those who need us to stand up with them or for them. We must! This moment in our history calls for our courage and strength...it’s not "someone else's problem." We're all in this together...

With Love, Passion, and Courage,

Mike Robbins


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On this week's episode of my Bring Your Whole Self to Work podcast I did a solo show (just me)...I share some of the insights and wisdom I've been learning from all of the interviews and research I've been doing for my book and this podcast, and I get real about some of my own journey over the course of this intense year. Check it out, http://ow.ly/Ik3Z305y7Wv


On today's episode of my podcast, Bring Your Whole Self to Work, I spoke with my friend Joe Greenstein, founder and former CEO of Flixster and founder of InnerSpace - an organization supporting start-up founders and their teams to take care of themselves and build cultures aligned with the passions of the products they create. We talked about the true definition of success, the importance of being loving and joyful, fatherhood, and more, http://ow.ly/a1MF305jvGk


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This week on my Bring Your Whole Self to Work podcast I had a chance to talk to my friend Anne Robie. Anne was the head of HR for StubHub where we had a chance to meet and work together. She has recently started her own consulting business called Darshan Leadership Consulting. We talked about the mindfulness movement and so much more, check it out our interview here: http://ow.ly/lHie304VAsW


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On this week's episode of the Bring Your Whole Self to Work podcast, I spoke with Jay Allen, the former EVP & Chief Administrative Officer at Charles Schwab. I enjoyed the conversation with Jay very much...we talked about, among other things, the importance of valuing people, http://ow.ly/giZL304d1SK

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My guest on this week's episode of my Bring Your Whole Self to Work podcast is my friend Lisa Earle McLeod. In the interview, we talk about (among other things) Leading with Noble Purpose: http://ow.ly/tOnT303K7Xv


Check out the latest episode of my Bring Your Whole Self to Work podcast: Work as a Catalyst for Growth, with Melissa Daimler, Head of Learning and Organizational Development at Twitter, http://mike-robbins.com/podcast-post/work-as-a-catalyst-for-growth-with-melissa-daimler/
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