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Steven Davidson
133 followers -
Parent, husband, physician-executive, change agent and techno-geek exploring ideas, connections among them and the music in my days.
Parent, husband, physician-executive, change agent and techno-geek exploring ideas, connections among them and the music in my days.

133 followers
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Please follow me at sjdavidson@sjdmd.com and DELETE my sjdavidson@gmail.com account from your circles.

I do not use this account and have deleted all my circles from this account so I won't see your posts here in any case.

I won't be posting/commenting or +1 here anymore. All activity is over at sjdavidson@sjdmd.com. Circling me here won't be very interesting.

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A bit fantastical, but one can hope.

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+Neil Versel great piece, tipped to me by +Steven Rudolph

My background in emergency medicine and prehospital care predisposes me to think this is all achievable. I've watched the evolution of high technology medicine taken to the field for more than 35 years. Dishman's vision is more likely achievable than not.

A few months back, Eric Dishman, chief healthcare strategist and director of health policy for the Intel-GE Care Innovations joint venture, spoke to me about how mobile and wireless healthcare technologies showed promise for what he called “virtual care coordination.” http://mobihealthnews.com/14243/intels-dishman-touts-virtual-care-coordination/

As Dishman explained, “In a world in which there’s not going to be enough doctors and nurses and hospital beds to take care of an increasingly older and sicker population, Intel’s really focused on how do we use disruptive technologies to enable care of people in the home and in the community.” (Watch this video of Dishman’s presentation at USRio+2.0. Dishman takes the stage at about 20:45. USRio+2.0 Panel II: Framing the Challenges )
. . . http://mobihealthnews.com/16349/mobility-forces-rethinking-of-hospital-centric-model/

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+Neil Versel great piece, tipped to me by +Steven Rudolph

My background in emergency medicine and prehospital care predisposes me to think this is all achievable. I've watched the evolution of high technology medicine taken to the field for more than 35 years. Dishman's vision is more likely achievable than not.

A few months back, Eric Dishman, chief healthcare strategist and director of health policy for the Intel-GE Care Innovations joint venture, spoke to me about how mobile and wireless healthcare technologies showed promise for what he called “virtual care coordination.” http://mobihealthnews.com/14243/intels-dishman-touts-virtual-care-coordination/

As Dishman explained, “In a world in which there’s not going to be enough doctors and nurses and hospital beds to take care of an increasingly older and sicker population, Intel’s really focused on how do we use disruptive technologies to enable care of people in the home and in the community.” (Watch this video of Dishman’s presentation at USRio+2.0. Dishman takes the stage at about 20:45. USRio+2.0 Panel II: Framing the Challenges )
. . . http://mobihealthnews.com/16349/mobility-forces-rethinking-of-hospital-centric-model/

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Medicine's Tech Future - Forbes http://sjd.md/wwsubE Worth reading for +David Shaywitz/@DShaywitz who describes the three phases many of us experience when our passion for innovation runs away with our ration. The balance is tough and right now much technology and salesmanship is devoted to pushing solutions that don't approach real world problem solving.

CMIO and clinical colleagues: It's why we'll have work for a long time.

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Palestinian Helps Romania Remake Its Emergency Care System - NYTimes.com http://sjd.md/w88bRR “I’m married to emergency medicine,” said Dr. Arafat, 47, who lives alone.

This piece makes me proud of our specialty and my 36 years as an emergency physician.

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Telemedicine has so many possibilities, but the key reality identified here is that the social-psychology of the various clinicians participating in care contributes importantly to the value achieved. The same issue pertains to realizing maximum benefit when clinician<-> patient interactions are evaluated.
"Being personally acquainted with the telemedicine doctor was important to the critical care nurses both in general and in terms of how likely the nurse was to communicate with the telemedicine staff." - No big surprise here. It's human nature to be more comfortable speaking with people we know. People that have been on a conference call, or video conference, with people they don't know understand what I mean. There's always some awkward points in the conversation secondary to lack of familiarity.

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Treating a Nation of Anxious Wimps http://sjd.md/wKT6aN Speaks truth to power: The general public. Each patient still requires 1:1 attention
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