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Seth Bordenstein
153 followers -
Scientist, Professor, Education Director on the microbiome, evolution, Wolbachia, bacteriophage, and antibiotics.
Scientist, Professor, Education Director on the microbiome, evolution, Wolbachia, bacteriophage, and antibiotics.

153 followers
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Seth's posts

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STOP what your doing. Go here please to "Ask Your Senators to Investment in NSF"

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Work hard, it pays off. This video features Emily Layton - a freshman undergrad at Vanderbilt, volunteer researcher at the time, and co-author on the new paper at Nature. 

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Some of the most exciting recent advances in biology have been in our understanding of how the microbiome—the community of bacteria, fungi, and other single-celled microorganisms—influences host functions and behaviors....

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What microbial genes can control sperm? This question is a 40 year old mystery in the Wolbachia field. How might the answer be useful? Our new publication reports that two prophage WO genes in the eukaryotic association module enable Wolbachia to cause cytoplasmic incompatibility. We seek to use these genes in the fight against dengue and Zika viruses.

Summary description and videos:

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For those that support a recount for election integrity, please know that they still need our urgent help. 

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We published a paper last week on microbiotas and host evolution in PLOS Biology. Key points are that (i) animals harbor distinguishable microbial communities and computer models can predict which host species the microbial communities belong to with strong accuracy (ii) divergence time correlates with the strength of interspecific microbiota distinguishability (iii) host evolutionary relationships are mostly congruent with total microbial community relationships and (iv) consistent with selection on host-microbiota interactions, animals do better with their own microbiota than with a microbiota from a related species.


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Chuffed to share our new @PLOSBiology publication on animal-microbiota phylosymbiosis (mice, insects, hominids) http://bit.ly/2g4M6g5

Here are four key points of the work:

1. Intraspecific microbiota variation is consistently less than interspecific microbiota variation, and microbiota-based models predict host species origin with high accuracy

2. Age of host clade divergence positively associates with the degree of microbial community distinguishability between species within the host clades, spanning recent host speciation events (~1 million y ago) to more distantly related host genera (~108 million y ago).

3. Topological congruence analyses of each group's complete phylogeny and microbiota dendrogram reveal significant degrees of phylosymbiosis, irrespective of host clade age or taxonomy.

4. Consistent with selection on host–microbiota interactions driving phylosymbiosis, there are survival and performance reductions when interspecific microbiota transplants are conducted between closely related and divergent host species pairs.


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NEW DOCUMENTARY: THE MICROBES THAT GOVERN US w Takema Fukatsu, Sylvain Charlat, Margaret McFall-Ngai, Seth Bordenstein, et al.

(CAN ONLY BE VIEWED IN CERTAIN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES)

"How bacteria, essential to the good health of our bodies, could be the engines of evolution. This exciting scientific survey sets out to discover the many researchers who, throughout the world, studying the importance of bacteria to the reign of living."

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New Blog Post at Symbionticism. 
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