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Soe Minag
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The Largest And Most Powerful Diesel Engine in The World

This is RT-flex96C - a two-stroke turbocharged diesel engine designed by the Finnish manufacturer Wärtsilä and is currently the largest and most powerful diesel engine in the world. Standing at 13.5 meters high and 26.59 meters long, it is almost as big as a small apartment. It weighs over 2,300 tonnes and its largest 14-cylinder version produces 80,080 kW of power.

The 14-cylinder version was put into service in September 2006 aboard the Emma Mærsk, a container ship – the largest at that time. The design is based on the older RTA96C engine, but revolutionary common rail technology has done away with the traditional camshaft, chain gear, fuel pumps and hydraulic actuators. The result is better performance at low revolutions per minute (rpm), lower fuel consumption, and lower harmful emissions.

Some stats about the engine:
Bore: 960 mm 
Stroke: 2,500 mm 
Displacement: 1,820 liters per cylinder 
Mean piston speed: 8.5 meters per second 
Engine speed: 22–102 RPM 
Torque: 7,603,850 newton metres (5,608,310 lbf·ft) @ 102 rpm 
Power: up to 5,720 kW per cylinder, 34,320–80,080 kW (46,680–108,920 BHP) total 
Mass of fuel injected per cylinder per cycle: ~160 g (about 6.5 ounces) @ full load 
Crankshaft weight: 300 tons

Source: http://goo.gl/bh0ce
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Researchers find surprising similarities between genetic and computer codes

"(Phys.org) —The term "survival of the fittest" refers to natural selection in biological systems, but Darwin's theory may apply more broadly than that. New research from the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory shows that this evolutionary theory also applies to technological systems.

Computational biologist Sergei Maslov of Brookhaven National Laboratory worked with graduate student Tin Yau Pang from Stony Brook University to compare the frequency with which components "survive" in two complex systems: bacterial genomes and operating systems on Linux computers. Their work is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-03-similarities-genetic-codes.html#jCp

More information: Universal distribution of component frequencies in biological and technological systems, www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/03/21/1217795110.abstract

This image shows a DNA molecule that is methylated on both strands on the center cytosine - Credit: Chritoph Bock (Max Planck Institute for Informatics)
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lol.. funny searches... :D
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According to a prominent Australian researcher, drugs that combat aging may be available within five years, following landmark research.
The study, published in a recent issue of the journal Science, finally proves that a single anti-aging enzyme in the body can be targeted, with the potential to prevent age-related diseases and extend lifespans.
The paper shows all of the 117 drugs tested work on the single enzyme through a common mechanism. This means that a whole new class of anti-aging drugs is now viable, which could ultimately prevent cancer, Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.
"Ultimately, these drugs would treat one disease, but unlike drugs of today, they would prevent 20 others," says the lead author of the paper, Professor David Sinclair, from UNSW Medicine, who is based at Harvard University. "In effect, they would slow aging."
#longevity  
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