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Eric Gavaletz
I measure the Internet for a living
I measure the Internet for a living
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Thursday was a new-bike-day at the Gavaletz house! We got a Surly Big Dummy from the fine folks up at Blue Heron Bikes in Berkeley. We got it so I could drop off the boys at school on my way to work, but it is quickly becoming my favorite bike (and I have plenty of nice bikes to chose from).

So far I have went on a doughnut run with the boys, dropped off donations at the thrift store, bought groceries a couple times (including cases of seltzer and a large watermelon), dropped off the boys at school and rode the rest of my 15 mile commute to work. It is a fun ride!

The boys outgrew their Chariot bike trailer a couple years ago, and have been riding bikes on their own since. It is nice to have a way to cover more distance with the whole family on bikes again (our daughter has a Chariot for one).
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8/31/15
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This is a great program, and I highly recommended it to any student that plans on entering industry when they graduate. Feel free to ask me questions if you have them.
Student applications for #gsoc2015  are now open! They will close on 27 March at 19:00 UTC. University students, apply today!
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I feel like I have to be very clear that this quote makes this woman from an affluent city in CA sound idiotic, and further she is promoting behavior that endangers our soon to be born child. There should be serious consequences for parents that chose not to have their kids vaccinated.

"It's good to explore alternatives rather than go with the panic of everyone around you. Vaccines don't feel right for me and my family."

I wonder if her ancestors stopped off for a martini before the Titanic sank.
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Write in Go (Fall 2014)
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So my lovely wife and I have two boys (caveat for this topic is that they are identical twins), we have a close friend with four boys, another close friend with three girls... I have developed this theory (because so many of our friends are having kids) that families were predisposed to having a particular gender. Of course this is a difficult problem to solve by observing families you know, because well there are not that many large families (four or more kids) and who is to say that one kid isn't an outlier in families of at most three.

This morning I decided to look into it a little more (with peer reviewed research), and I discovered that I may be falling victim to confirmation bias. I say maybe because there is one confounding variable that throws off all the data that can be used to attack this problem (family planning):

"Parents who have a boy and a girl as their first two children are more likely to stop having children than are parents whose first two children are of the same sex." [0]

Family planning (selective abortions) also distorts data for sex ratios in large parts of Asia and North Africa due to son preference [1]. But what I find really interesting, and why I think that this isn't purely up to chance is that we do have evidence that there are factors that can swing the sex ratio in a significant way. For instance there are more boys born during and after wars [1]. A study on populations in Denmark found that more boys were being born than girls [2], and while they propose hypothesis as to why the cause is still unknown. A study that was motivated by the author's family having 21 boys out of 24 biological children found that in the larger picture they "found no compelling evidence that sex bias runs in the family" [3].

All of this leads me to believe that this is definitely still an open question that should be researched further, and that while the average family (sic) isn't predisposed to have children of one sex over another there are probably specific combinations or environmental stressors that can cause outliers like 21 boys or more boys being born at war times. Oh, and just in case you were curious the Duggar family is 10 boys and 9 girls at last count [4].

[0] Human Sex Ratios and Sex Distribution in Sibships of Size 2 http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1038&context=bio_fac
[1] Abnormal sex ratios in human populations: Causes and consequences http://www.pnas.org/content/103/36/13271.full
[2] Sex Ratios, Family Size, and Birth Order http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/150/9/957.full.pdf
[3] Does Having Boys or Girls Run in the Family? http://www.isds.duke.edu/~dalene/chance/chanceweb/144.rodgers.pdf
[4] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/19_Kids_and_Counting#Duggar_family
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Because fun stuff is important stuff.
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I remember thinking that Google should do this, and even asked a few Googlers about it at a conference...they kind of nodded and smiled agreeing that it was a neat idea. They were probably already doing internal tests at that point :-)
Today we are launching the Chrome Mobile data compression proxy to all users. It's been a wild ride getting to this point, and I'm super proud of my team.
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Packing up our herd of bikes to head out west, and I needed something to use as a fork spacer. Take a 3" to 4" PVC reducer and it fits perfectly in the 100 mm dropouts of the fork. Mark the center of the dropouts, and drill 13/64" holes for the skewer. Put the skewer through the holes and place in the front fork. Now the fork is protected from being squished and dropped.
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Chrome's new New Tab Page
So the only way I could get Chrome to allow me to access the old "new tab page" was through an internal extension call. Typing chrome-internal://newtab into the address bar simply triggers a search for that term. But on that page I was looking at the source...
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