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Henning von Vogelsang
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Henning von Vogelsang

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The un-word “cyber” is clung onto by a generation who recognized the power of connected computers only when they realized how they could manipulate the Internet into something that is constantly producing fear.

Of course they’re never getting tired to repeat that mantra, cyberwar, at any opportunity that is remotely related. A multi billion dollar company has low security standards, which always comes to the light of the day the moment they are caught pants down. Can someone point out what’s surprising about that?

Newt Gingrich, the guy who wanted to have the Internet run by the government in 1997, doesn’t seize to amaze us with meaningless drivle with upheld pointing finger. He tends to forget the “keep them in fear” method only works while your lobby is in office, unlocking unlimited funds for wars to unearth inextistent WMDs, building concentration camps outside any jurisdiction and inventing new names for torture to separate America from other human rights-abolishing nations.
 
more like a company too dumb to operate even light machinery is meeting its deserved maker.
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While I’m still working on the greater releases of the Hikari font family and Theory Serif, Sans and Mono, I was crazy enough to begin work on a fifth font project.

The idea was born out of a personal need. For months I have been working in Coda to write CSS and HTML code, and I got tired of the array of fonts in the monospaced category, some of which come with the system, some I collected over the past couple of years. From Menlo (Apple) to Droid Sans (Google), I couldn’t find a font that I found was well designed for an on-screen reading experience. Designers of monospaced fonts often claim they were thinking about computer displays first, but when you look at the results, especially in common sizes ranging from 10 to 18 points, the letter shapes often look washed up and have sometimes been just compressed or extended to fit a space (I’m looking at you, first version of Source Code Pro). Bad hinting and unclear shapes result in a nearly unidentifyable letter shape and the overall legibility is suffering.

Of course, the very idea of a monospaced font is actually against improved legibility, because it takes away nearly all options to even out white space and create a harmonic experience.

What can be changed though is the individual shape. I think nowhere else it is more crucial to get this part right, than with a monospaced typeface designed for screen. We have various screen resolutions today, ranging from tiny devices (like wrist watches) to an iMac with a 5k Retina Display. For programmers looking at a display for hours, the reading experience becomes as much, if not more, relevant than other practical considerations when choosing a monospaced font.

So this is Bot Mono, a very young, fresh project of mine and I hope you will share your thoughts and critique with me. There will be a few more changes and a large set of glyphs need yet to be worked out, the numbers are missing yet, but it’s already showing a lot of its personality and I am curious to hear what you think.

Questions

* Do you think I’m on a good path overall? Do you see major mistakes or things you’d change, and why?
* You may have noticed the inconsistency of what Erik Spiekerman calls “the canon”, the pattern of shapes used for letters such as c, e, b and a. Some are closing, some have an open, humanist shape. The idea was partly inspired by Roboto and Nick Shinn’s recent release, Neology, which I love, by the way. What are your thoughts on this part? Do you think it works and doesn't disturb the reading flow?

#font  #typeface #monospaced #monospaced-font #bot  #bot-mono #mono  #fixed-width #programming   #coding  
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I agree with the above comment, one of the most important things for me when it comes to choosing a font is that similar characters have to be very easy to distinguish. Not just subtle differences... cause after 8 hours of staring at a screen I even see W and S the same!
For example, I like the way DejaVu Sans Mono makes the distinction between 1 and l. That shape of smallcase L is the ideal for me.
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https://medium.com/@core/vamonos-89aaa5dd9c05

Recently I published my autobiographic shortstory Vámonos on Medium. Do you think it’s worth entering it into a shortstory competition? Where else would you publish it? Let me know what you think!
During my teenage years I had what you could call flings, short relationships, usually with girls I met while traveling,…
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Henning von Vogelsang

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Vámonos, My new autobiographic shortstory on Medium.

https://medium.com/@core/vamonos-89aaa5dd9c05
During my teenage years I had what you could call flings, short relationships, usually with girls I met while traveling,…
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Henning von Vogelsang

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After the first snow melted. #iphone
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Hikari Regular is in the last stages of development.
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While I’m still working on the greater releases of the Hikari font family and Theory Serif, Sans and Mono, I was crazy enough to begin work on a fifth font project.

The idea was born out of a personal need. For months I have been working in Coda to write CSS and HTML code, and I got tired of the array of fonts in the monospaced category, some of which come with the system, some I collected over the past couple of years. From Menlo (Apple) to Droid Sans (Google), I couldn’t find a font that I found was well designed for an on-screen reading experience. Designers of monospaced fonts often claim they were thinking about computer displays first, but when you look at the results, especially in common sizes ranging from 10 to 18 points, the letter shapes often look washed up and have sometimes been just compressed or extended to fit a space (I’m looking at you, first version of Source Code Pro). Bad hinting and unclear shapes result in a nearly unidentifyable letter shape and the overall legibility is suffering.

Of course, the very idea of a monospaced font is actually against improved legibility, because it takes away nearly all options to even out white space and create a harmonic experience.

What can be changed though is the individual shape. I think nowhere else it is more crucial to get this part right, than with a monospaced typeface designed for screen. We have various screen resolutions today, ranging from tiny devices (like wrist watches) to an iMac with a 5k Retina Display. For programmers looking at a display for hours, the reading experience becomes as much, if not more, relevant than other practical considerations when choosing a monospaced font.

So this is Bot Mono, a very young, fresh project of mine and I hope you will share your thoughts and critique with me. There will be a few more changes and a large set of glyphs need yet to be worked out, the numbers are missing yet, but it’s already showing a lot of its personality and I am curious to hear what you think.

Questions

* Do you think I’m on a good path overall? Do you see major mistakes or things you’d change, and why?
* You may have noticed the inconsistency of what Erik Spiekerman calls “the canon”, the pattern of shapes used for letters such as c, e, b and a. Some are closing, some have an open, humanist shape. The idea was partly inspired by Roboto and Nick Shinn’s recent release, Neology, which I love, by the way. What are your thoughts on this part? Do you think it works and doesn't disturb the reading flow?

#font  #typeface #monospaced #monospaced-font #bot  #bot-mono #mono  #fixed-width #programming   #coding  
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Henning von Vogelsang

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While I’m still working on the greater releases of the Hikari font family and Theory Serif, Sans and Mono, I was crazy enough to begin work on a fifth font project.

The idea was born out of a personal need. For months I have been working in Coda to write CSS and HTML code, and I got tired of the array of fonts in the monospaced category, some of which come with the system, some I collected over the past couple of years. From Menlo (Apple) to Droid Sans (Google), I couldn’t find a font that I found was well designed for an on-screen reading experience. Designers of monospaced fonts often claim they were thinking about computer displays first, but when you look at the results, especially in common sizes ranging from 10 to 18 points, the letter shapes often look washed up and have sometimes been just compressed or extended to fit a space (I’m looking at you, first version of Source Code Pro). Bad hinting and unclear shapes result in a nearly unidentifyable letter shape and the overall legibility is suffering.

Of course, the very idea of a monospaced font is actually against improved legibility, because it takes away nearly all options to even out white space and create a harmonic experience.

What can be changed though is the individual shape. I think nowhere else it is more crucial to get this part right, than with a monospaced typeface designed for screen. We have various screen resolutions today, ranging from tiny devices (like wrist watches) to an iMac with a 5k Retina Display. For programmers looking at a display for hours, the reading experience becomes as much, if not more, relevant than other practical considerations when choosing a monospaced font.

So this is Bot Mono, a very young, fresh project of mine and I hope you will share your thoughts and critique with me. There will be a few more changes and a large set of glyphs need yet to be worked out, the numbers are missing yet, but it’s already showing a lot of its personality and I am curious to hear what you think.

Questions

* Do you think I’m on a good path overall? Do you see major mistakes or things you’d change, and why?
* You may have noticed the inconsistency of what Erik Spiekerman calls “the canon”, the pattern of shapes used for letters such as c, e, b and a. Some are closing, some have an open, humanist shape. The idea was partly inspired by Roboto and Nick Shinn’s recent release, Neology, which I love, by the way. What are your thoughts on this part? Do you think it works and doesn't disturb the reading flow?

#font  #typeface #monospaced #monospaced-font #bot  #bot-mono #mono  #fixed-width #programming   #coding  
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Yes. Of course. I apologize for interrupting you!
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After the first snow melted.
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Henning von Vogelsang

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Very happy about the fresh Listacular update that adds iOS 8 compatibility, especially great with iPhone 6 Plus! #ux #great
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Input is a typeface for code, designed by David Jonathan Ross and released by Font Bureau.
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I saw Source Code Pro when it came out. To me it was not refined enough. It looks like a quick and dirty version of the Sans cut. Some characters, like the lowercase a, are just expanded in width, without further adjustment.

What I find remarkable here is how much thinking goes into customization. You can choose your lowercase i/l preference, with a serif atop or two at the bottom, for an example. You can choose the embedded line-height, which is often overseen as a feature that improves legibility. You can even select the width of the glyphs (overall width of the font) and pair your couple of light/medium to regular/black font veresions. Not to mention the thinking that went into screen rendering and hinting. 

So far, the versatility I see here has been unmatched with other free coding fonts.

BoldMonday, another type foundry, made the font Nitti, which was used by the iA Writer app. Nitti was also designed for screen first. It has a nostalgic typewriter feel to it. This font however, was designed as a pure workhorse.
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Hikari Regular is in the last stages of development.
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In their circles
755 people
Have them in circles
903 people
Britt Mills's profile photo
Marc Hensel's profile photo
Florian Kloin's profile photo
Orion Fischer's profile photo
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Story
Introduction
I’m all about learning, living, story telling, experiencing, transmitting and loving the stuff that makes us go.
One of the bigger and better Apple Stores, compared to those in the region. It’s definitely better than the smaller one in the Glatt Zentrum shopping centre. Opening times are good, not great (they used to be open until 10:00 PM, now 8:00 PM).
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Actually, Conrad in Dietlikon has a lot of electronic items too, but Pusterla is more for tinkerers and DIY electronics.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Commercio isn't just a bar, like the name suggests. It's an Italian restaurant which serves simple traditional Italian meals. You'll find the touristy spaghetti dish as well as lesser known pasta specialities, often with home made pasta. Its Carpaccio is delicious, likely the best simple dish in town. One great advantage of this little place is, you will almost always find a place. Ideal for spontaneous decisions.
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago
4 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago