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Henning von Vogelsang
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The un-word “cyber” is clung onto by a generation who recognized the power of connected computers only when they realized how they could manipulate the Internet into something that is constantly producing fear.

Of course they’re never getting tired to repeat that mantra, cyberwar, at any opportunity that is remotely related. A multi billion dollar company has low security standards, which always comes to the light of the day the moment they are caught pants down. Can someone point out what’s surprising about that?

Newt Gingrich, the guy who wanted to have the Internet run by the government in 1997, doesn’t seize to amaze us with meaningless drivle with upheld pointing finger. He tends to forget the “keep them in fear” method only works while your lobby is in office, unlocking unlimited funds for wars to unearth inextistent WMDs, building concentration camps outside any jurisdiction and inventing new names for torture to separate America from other human rights-abolishing nations.
more like a company too dumb to operate even light machinery is meeting its deserved maker.
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While I’m still working on the greater releases of the Hikari font family and Theory Serif, Sans and Mono, I was crazy enough to begin work on a fifth font project.

The idea was born out of a personal need. For months I have been working in Coda to write CSS and HTML code, and I got tired of the array of fonts in the monospaced category, some of which come with the system, some I collected over the past couple of years. From Menlo (Apple) to Droid Sans (Google), I couldn’t find a font that I found was well designed for an on-screen reading experience. Designers of monospaced fonts often claim they were thinking about computer displays first, but when you look at the results, especially in common sizes ranging from 10 to 18 points, the letter shapes often look washed up and have sometimes been just compressed or extended to fit a space (I’m looking at you, first version of Source Code Pro). Bad hinting and unclear shapes result in a nearly unidentifyable letter shape and the overall legibility is suffering.

Of course, the very idea of a monospaced font is actually against improved legibility, because it takes away nearly all options to even out white space and create a harmonic experience.

What can be changed though is the individual shape. I think nowhere else it is more crucial to get this part right, than with a monospaced typeface designed for screen. We have various screen resolutions today, ranging from tiny devices (like wrist watches) to an iMac with a 5k Retina Display. For programmers looking at a display for hours, the reading experience becomes as much, if not more, relevant than other practical considerations when choosing a monospaced font.

So this is Bot Mono, a very young, fresh project of mine and I hope you will share your thoughts and critique with me. There will be a few more changes and a large set of glyphs need yet to be worked out, the numbers are missing yet, but it’s already showing a lot of its personality and I am curious to hear what you think.

Questions

* Do you think I’m on a good path overall? Do you see major mistakes or things you’d change, and why?
* You may have noticed the inconsistency of what Erik Spiekerman calls “the canon”, the pattern of shapes used for letters such as c, e, b and a. Some are closing, some have an open, humanist shape. The idea was partly inspired by Roboto and Nick Shinn’s recent release, Neology, which I love, by the way. What are your thoughts on this part? Do you think it works and doesn't disturb the reading flow?

#font  #typeface #monospaced #monospaced-font #bot  #bot-mono #mono  #fixed-width #programming   #coding  
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While I’m still working on the greater releases of the Hikari font family and Theory Serif, Sans and Mono, I was crazy enough to begin work on a fifth font project.

The idea was born out of a personal need. For months I have been working in Coda to write CSS and HTML code, and I got tired of the array of fonts in the monospaced category, some of which come with the system, some I collected over the past couple of years. From Menlo (Apple) to Droid Sans (Google), I couldn’t find a font that I found was well designed for an on-screen reading experience. Designers of monospaced fonts often claim they were thinking about computer displays first, but when you look at the results, especially in common sizes ranging from 10 to 18 points, the letter shapes often look washed up and have sometimes been just compressed or extended to fit a space (I’m looking at you, first version of Source Code Pro). Bad hinting and unclear shapes result in a nearly unidentifyable letter shape and the overall legibility is suffering.

Of course, the very idea of a monospaced font is actually against improved legibility, because it takes away nearly all options to even out white space and create a harmonic experience.

What can be changed though is the individual shape. I think nowhere else it is more crucial to get this part right, than with a monospaced typeface designed for screen. We have various screen resolutions today, ranging from tiny devices (like wrist watches) to an iMac with a 5k Retina Display. For programmers looking at a display for hours, the reading experience becomes as much, if not more, relevant than other practical considerations when choosing a monospaced font.

So this is Bot Mono, a very young, fresh project of mine and I hope you will share your thoughts and critique with me. There will be a few more changes and a large set of glyphs need yet to be worked out, the numbers are missing yet, but it’s already showing a lot of its personality and I am curious to hear what you think.

Questions

* Do you think I’m on a good path overall? Do you see major mistakes or things you’d change, and why?
* You may have noticed the inconsistency of what Erik Spiekerman calls “the canon”, the pattern of shapes used for letters such as c, e, b and a. Some are closing, some have an open, humanist shape. The idea was partly inspired by Roboto and Nick Shinn’s recent release, Neology, which I love, by the way. What are your thoughts on this part? Do you think it works and doesn't disturb the reading flow?

#font  #typeface #monospaced #monospaced-font #bot  #bot-mono #mono  #fixed-width #programming   #coding  
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While I’m still working on the greater releases of the Hikari font family and Theory Serif, Sans and Mono, I was crazy enough to begin work on a fifth font project.

The idea was born out of a personal need. For months I have been working in Coda to write CSS and HTML code, and I got tired of the array of fonts in the monospaced category, some of which come with the system, some I collected over the past couple of years. From Menlo (Apple) to Droid Sans (Google), I couldn’t find a font that I found was well designed for an on-screen reading experience. Designers of monospaced fonts often claim they were thinking about computer displays first, but when you look at the results, especially in common sizes ranging from 10 to 18 points, the letter shapes often look washed up and have sometimes been just compressed or extended to fit a space (I’m looking at you, first version of Source Code Pro). Bad hinting and unclear shapes result in a nearly unidentifyable letter shape and the overall legibility is suffering.

Of course, the very idea of a monospaced font is actually against improved legibility, because it takes away nearly all options to even out white space and create a harmonic experience.

What can be changed though is the individual shape. I think nowhere else it is more crucial to get this part right, than with a monospaced typeface designed for screen. We have various screen resolutions today, ranging from tiny devices (like wrist watches) to an iMac with a 5k Retina Display. For programmers looking at a display for hours, the reading experience becomes as much, if not more, relevant than other practical considerations when choosing a monospaced font.

So this is Bot Mono, a very young, fresh project of mine and I hope you will share your thoughts and critique with me. There will be a few more changes and a large set of glyphs need yet to be worked out, the numbers are missing yet, but it’s already showing a lot of its personality and I am curious to hear what you think.

Questions

* Do you think I’m on a good path overall? Do you see major mistakes or things you’d change, and why?
* You may have noticed the inconsistency of what Erik Spiekerman calls “the canon”, the pattern of shapes used for letters such as c, e, b and a. Some are closing, some have an open, humanist shape. The idea was partly inspired by Roboto and Nick Shinn’s recent release, Neology, which I love, by the way. What are your thoughts on this part? Do you think it works and doesn't disturb the reading flow?

#font  #typeface #monospaced #monospaced-font #bot  #bot-mono #mono  #fixed-width #programming   #coding  
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https://medium.com/@core/vamonos-89aaa5dd9c05

Recently I published my autobiographic shortstory Vámonos on Medium. Do you think it’s worth entering it into a shortstory competition? Where else would you publish it? Let me know what you think!

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Vámonos, My new autobiographic shortstory on Medium.

https://medium.com/@core/vamonos-89aaa5dd9c05

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After the first snow melted.
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After the first snow melted. #iphone
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Very happy about the fresh Listacular update that adds iOS 8 compatibility, especially great with iPhone 6 Plus! #ux #great

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