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Fridrik Mar Jonsson
Works at Plain Vanilla Games
Attends Reykjavík University
Lived in Vancouver, Canada
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I may be biased, but I think this topic is awesome!
 
Put your geography skills to the test in the #GoogleMaps 'Earth from Above' topic on +QuizUp

Play #QuizUp  on your Android (http://goo.gl/ZDGBtr) or iPhone (http://goo.gl/qL2nJj)
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Fridrik Mar Jonsson

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The garlic fries in this place are ridiculous.
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Hey all!  I'm an intern at Reykjavik University, and we're rewriting parts of our student information system using AngularJS.

We needed to authenticate users using the OAuth client-side flow (implicit grants).  I've written a service to help with token retrieval and storage, accompanied by a demo of how to use it with Google's OAuth system: https://github.com/enginous/angular-oauth.  There's a link to an online demo in the README.

I'm still learning internals and trying to get into the Angular mindset, so I'd love any feedback! Bear in mind that this is literally the first version that works that I'm submitting for early feedback, so it's far from done (see the roadmap; not exhaustive.)
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+Fridrik Mar Jonsson I'm excited to see how you address the Oauth token in javascript and how you inject it into Modules... Or even if you do that at all ;)

+Arnold Bockenbauer The good thing about the open source community is I'm always reminded how freaking stupid I am... not explicitly, but implicitly if the demo/apps people make.
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Fridrik Mar Jonsson

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Worst practice of the day: For added security, encrypt all data with MD5 and decrypt it using rainbow tables.
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For extra points, realize that MD5 is completely uncrackable for long strings. Proceed to replace very large files with MD5 to enhance security and save tremendous amounts of space.
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As someone who has just enjoyed the full breadth of what this community has to offer, I would like to thank you for these squirrels.
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Fridrik Mar Jonsson

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Just a shout-out to my Google+ followers (encirclers?) and profile visitors (yes, I'm looking at all three of you): I mostly live on +Quora these days. It's quite awesome so if you haven't tried it, come over and say hi!
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We're on Android! #QuizUp   #Android   #Joy  
The world’s largest trivia game is finally available on Android!Join over 1...
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Vel gert. Downloaded.
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Fridrik Mar Jonsson

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Plain Vanilla Games (out of Iceland!) has just released QuizUp for the iPhone, a highly addictive real-time quiz game with more than 250 topics.

First impressions:

● My fountain of knowledge probably isn't going to win me any championships any time soon. This will not surprise anyone who's played Trivial Pursuit with me.
● The "rematch" feature is a lot of fun, especially if you find a player on your level. The chat feature is super cool too; I've already made conversation with someone who I was having exciting tech competitions with.
● The question database seems established and many of the questions are clever or funny (see screenshot). And it seems there's more to come!
● I generally feel a bit guilty playing games, but I feel less guilty with QuizUp because I'm genuinely learning something (and because I can choose a topic, what I'm learning is even related to my interests).

If you're on an iDevice, you should grab QuizUp: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/quizup/id718421443

The bad news is that my Nexus 5 arrived today, and this game is exclusively for the iPhone at the moment. This is a first-world problem for sure. Maybe I'll end up using my iPhone as an entertainment device.
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Fridrik Mar Jonsson

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This is the latest Facebook MBA ad by the Acton School of Business.

Steve Jobs achieved many great things, but nobody should aspire to be a leader like he was. His unique personality composition worked phenomenally for his particular situation and environment, but in many ways he was a dysfunctional (and abusive) leader that should not be idolized.

Because of his success, his makeup of traits may appear to be a silver bullet to successful leadership outcomes.  And perhaps because of this, some people exalt the visionary leader who monopolizes responsibility and decision-making.

However, there is very little evidence to support his style of leadership as leading to good outcomes.  While assertiveness, attention to detail and results-orientation are valuable leadeship traits, an autocratic style such as Jobs' has been shown to be demotivating to everyone else involved and unlikely to yield good outcomes unless for the know-it-alls who actually, well, happens to know it all. (This is a problematic situation, because as a know-it-all leader, it's hard to find out whether you know better than everyone else: if someone you ask disagrees, they're wrong by definition.)

Steve Jobs' story is not a body of research, but rather the case of a character that is as remarkable as it is improbable.  I believe you generally shouldn't aspire to be someone else, but for the love of everything beautiful, please do not aspire to be Steve Jobs.

Perhaps go work with some phenomenal people instead, or devour some research on effective leadership. (I'm a fan of Bob Sutton's research-based approach to leadership, and his book _Good Boss, Bad Boss_ goes highly recommended as a light read of that kind – although I'm honestly yet to read it.)

Lastly, if you're a business school, please don't use Jobs as the poster child for your MBA program unless your goal is to attract students with a flawed idea of good leadership, and if the first thing on your curriculum is to correct that idea.
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That's a good point, and that's in fact precisely how my thinking goes.  The chances that you are a person like Steve Jobs in the same market and cultural environment as him are diminutive.  Furthermore, what worked for his team might not work with just any group of people.

So idolization doesn't work.  Here's what I think might work:  Most people care about some kind of success.  Unfortunately, people often seek to meet some objective definition of "success" instead of defining it for themselves.  This is perhaps why people strive to be Steve Jobs.  Your kind of success might be very different from that of Steve Jobs, adding to the list of reasons why you should not try to emulate him.

Once you've defined success for yourself, you can think about what you need to get there.  The people you surround yourself with will be crucial in determining your success.  From everything I've heard and experienced, there is no such thing as investing too much in finding the right people.

Ideally, the people you end up choosing to work with will share your values and believe in your mission.  Only when you have this group in front of you do you look around to see what you can do to help your coworkers succeed.  What do they need?  Crucially, this is different from adopting a generic leadership style – be that from Jobs or from a management textbook – and merely applying it to any team you encounter.

Just like not every patient needs the same prescription, different teams call for different managerial approaches and emphases.  Depending on the most important problems facing your team, you can get advice from experienced managers or delve into some research.

 – If you want committed coworkers who care about the organization and are happy at work, research is quick to point you towards participative leadership.

 – If you want to keep a sustainable pace in a development team, you'll want to understand engagement — the antithesis of burnout.

 – If you care deeply about organizational success, you may want to focus on understanding strategy and consensus-building on personal, team and organizational levels.

Because you were careful in choosing the kind of people you work with, your preferred solutions about leadership are likely to be aligned with them.  And because you more or less share core values and goals, any controversial ideas can be discussed and judged by objective merit rather than subjective values.  These are the benefits of the highly-praised culture fit phenomenon.

All that without trying to be someone else.  Pretty liberating, eh?

(I'm yet to put this into practice myself. You'll have to forgive my low credibility as someone who's never held a management position or occupied an ivory tower.)
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I'm thinking about how it might be possible to improve discussions for long-form articles to solve a some of the usability issues with meaningful dialog about pieces when the number of participants has reached medium to high volumes, now usually contained in comment systems.

As some of you have probably noticed, naively implemented comment discussions often become unmanageable after even 20+ comments, which makes dialog – as opposed to just broadcasting yourself into a vacuum – less meaningful.

One idea that I'm thinking about is whether it might make articles a bit more fun if you could highlight some text and add your comments "inline": to the side instead of at the bottom.  This would be a simple way of quoting something from the article, and readers would be able stop at something that makes them think (e.g., a controversial statement) and look at the discussion.  You might even "like" certain passages, such as something that made you laugh, to give the writer feedback.

It's sort of like code review, except there isn't a goal other than matching up people who share a common interest in further discussing something in the article.  Would it encourage engagement?  Would it make for higher quality discussions or just promote less thoughtful comments that don't consider the author's entire point?  How would you implement the UI with people highlighting overlapping text segments of different lengths?  What are the major problems with this idea in general?  Is this even helpful or called for?
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+Fridrik Mar Jonsson When my friends here at Google Plus share an article, they often copy-paste the part which they want to highlight or discuss. Simple as that. And it works perfectly.
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Fridrik Mar Jonsson

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"[A] researcher attempting to prove that P equals NP only needs to find a polynomial time algorithm for an NP-complete problem to achieve this goal."  – Introduction to the Theory of Computation (Sipser, 2005.)

"Just find an algorithm in P, they said. That's all you'd have to do, they said," the researcher sobbed, five years into his career.
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Have him in circles
128 people
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Work
Occupation
Software Engineer
Employment
  • Plain Vanilla Games
    Software Engineer, 2013 - present
  • VIS Insurance Ltd.
    Software developer, 2010 - 2013
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Vancouver, Canada - Reykjavík, Iceland
Story
Tagline
Software developer who enjoys cities, data, ethics, music, novelty, products, psychology, and words.
Education
  • Reykjavík University
    Computer Science, 2011 - present
  • Reykjavík University
    Computer Science, 2009 - 2010
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Gender
Male
Other names
Fred