Profile cover photo
Profile photo
IIAC - Investment Industry Association Of Canada
About
IIAC - Investment Industry Association Of Canada's posts

Post has attachment
Robo-advising in Canada is a small part of the advisor market, but has great potential. BI Intelligence, Business Insiders' research unit, predicts that globally, robo-advisors will have $8 trillion in assets under management by 2020. This is part two of the spirited debate between the owner of a robo-advisor firm, Randy Cass, the founder of Nest Wealth, and the president of the Investment Industry Association of Canada, Ian Russell.

http://www.bnn.ca/bnn-advisor/video/robo-advisor-versus-the-traditional-advisor-round-two-of-the-debate~1055031


Post has attachment
Robo-advising in Canada is a small part of the advisor market, but has great potential. BI Intelligence, Business Insiders' research unit, predicts that globally, robo-advisors will have $8 trillion in assets under management by 2020. Part one of this BNN Advisor consists of a spirited debate between the owner of a robo-advisor firm, Randy Cass, the founder of Nest Wealth, and the president of the Investment Industry Association of Canada, Ian Russell.

http://www.bnn.ca/bnn-advisor/video/robo-advisor-versus-the-traditional-advisor-round-one-of-the-debate~1056196

Post has attachment
IIAC's Ian Russell, in his latest Letter from the President, looks at the rise of populism in the developed world. He argues that the emergence of the "new normal", marked by weak GDP growth and stagnant incomes, has unfolded as a troubling, persistently enduring economic condition, rather than a cyclical phenomenon. He stresses that governments must find consensus for pro-growth policies, or risk political pressure for even more radical policy solutions. This applies to Canada as well. The Canadian government needs to move in lock-step with its own pro-growth agenda to boost investment, jobs and opportunity.

You can read the latest IIAC Letter from the President by clicking here: http://iiac.ca/wp-content/uploads/IIAC-Letter-from-the-President-Vol-103.pdf
Photo

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
What does 2017 have in store for investors? Watch the Empire Club's Annual Investment Outlook live for free 12:40 EST: http://okt.to/JEg31l
Photo

Post has attachment
Photo

Post has attachment
Attracting Capital to the Wealth Management Business

In his latest industry letter, IIAC President and CEO Ian Russell describes the opportunities and challenges for the retail investment industry.

Firms have made herculean efforts to control cost increases through staffing reductions, increased reliance on technology and out-sourcing, and adjustments to advisor compensation grids.

Firms have also focused efforts on improving advisor productivity through training and continuing education programs. They have boosted their competiveness by providing real-time access to advisors and accounts; a full complement of products and advisory services; a balanced approach between fee-based or discretionary management and value-added financial planning and tax expertise; effective recruitment of advisors; and a smooth transition from older to younger advisors. Some firms have segmented advisory services across different client categories and established pricing schedules for individual services.

These measures will improve the bottom line and return on equity, drawing capital to smaller firms.

While there may be further attrition among small and mid-sized firms in the investment dealer retail business in coming years, the IIAC is optimistic the many firms that survive will be effective and profitable purveyors of wealth management advisory services, with their clients the big winners.

Click here to read the IIAC Letter from the President: http://iiac.ca/wp-content/uploads/IIAC-Letter-from-the-President-Vol-101.pdf 
Photo

Post has attachment
Let’s Remember Them

They are our fathers, brothers, mothers and sisters, neighbours … heroes.

Canada’s Veterans. Their courage, service and sacrifice will never be forgotten.

On November 11, let’s remember them.

Photo

Post has attachment
IIAC Congratulates Lori Pinkowski on Being Named the
2016 IIAC Top Under 40 Award Recipient

Toronto, ON, October 27, 2016 – The Investment Industry Association of Canada (IIAC) is pleased to announce that Lori Pinkowski, Senior Portfolio Manager and Senior Vice President, Private Client Group at Raymond James Ltd., has been named the 2016 recipient of the IIAC Top Under 40 Award.

The IIAC Top Under 40 Award recognizes and celebrates the new generation of highly motivated and talented young professionals whose drive, dedication, qualities and accomplishments have brought distinction to the investment/financial industry.

"I've been fortunate enough to have many milestones in my career since becoming a licensed Financial Advisor at the age of 21. I've had the privilege to work in the financial industry for over 16 years and as the IIAC Top Under 40 Award recipient, this is a huge testament to my accomplishments, and a reminder that the best is yet to come,” Pinkowski said.

Based in Vancouver, Ms. Pinkowski was among 33 outstanding Nominees from across Canada reflecting the talent, diversity and commitment to social responsibility in the industry.

“The accomplishments and ambition of this year’s Award recipient and nominees are most impressive. These individuals have the future of Canada’s investment industry in their hands. Indeed, the calibre of past recipients and nominees for the IIAC Top Under 40 Award portends a bright future for the securities industry,” said Ian Russell, IIAC President and CEO.
Photo

Post has attachment
The Cost-Benefit Thinking of Securities Regulators Needs to be More Transparent

Cost–benefit analysis is a valuable tool for assessing major public policy decisions, projects and regulations—for example, evaluating prospective regulations in a number of fields, including health, safety and the environment. The nature of securities regulation, however, makes costs-benefit analysis more difficult. Rather than focusing on a particular action, like releasing a pollutant, financial regulation cost-benefit analysis focuses on behavioural and market reactions.

Canadian securities regulators have refrained from conducting formal (quantitative) cost-benefit analysis because it is so complex. However, this not an excuse to avoid it. A more disciplined and rigorous approach to the rule-making process—one that quantifies the costs and the benefits in commensurable terms—is needed.

Regulators do engage in extensive, informal discussions (qualitative analysis) with market participants at the formulation stage of the rule-making. A detailed “walk-through” of regulators’ thinking would greatly enhance the process. Regulators should be able to answer questions like:

- What gap is the proposed rule intended to fill?
- Have alternatives to the rule been considered and, if so, why has the particular rule be chosen over alternatives?
- What are the perceived shortcomings/unintended consequences of the rule?

The obligation to disclose the detailed background thinking on rule formulation and its impact on investors and the marketplace would foster a more disciplined approach to the rule-making process itself. It would encourage deeper and more systematic thinking on the market impact of proposed rules, and lead over time to more quantitative analysis.

Read more in the latest IIAC Letter from the President: http://iiac.ca/wp-content/uploads/IIAC-Letter-from-the-President-Vol-100.pdf
Photo
Wait while more posts are being loaded