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Ward Plunet
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59,758 followers
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Breast milk may be best for premature babies' brain development

Babies born before their due date show better brain development when fed breast milk rather than formula, a study has found. Experts say that helping mothers to provide breast milk in the weeks after giving birth could improve long-term outcomes for children born pre-term. Premature birth has been linked to an increased possibility of problems with learning and thinking skills in later life, which are thought to be linked to alterations in brain development.
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Self-driving homes could be the future of affordable housing

The convergence of new technologies including artificial intelligence, the internet of things, electric cars, and drone delivery systems suggests an unlikely solution to the growing housing crisis. In the next few years, we may use an app on our smartphones to notify our houses to pick us up or drop us off. Honda recently announced the IeMobi Concept. It is an autonomous mobile living room that attaches and detaches from your home. When parked, the vehicle becomes a 50-square-foot living or workspace. Mercedes-Benz Vans rolled out an all-electric digitally-connected van with fully integrated cargo space and drone delivery capability, and Volvo just unveiled its 360c concept vehicle that serves as either a living room or mobile office. In other cases, some folks are simply retrofitting existing vehicles. One couple in Oxford England successfully converted a Mercedes Sprinter van into a micro-home that includes 153 square feet of living space, a complete kitchen, a sink, a fridge, a four-person dining area, and hidden storage spaces.
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Manga - coloring between the lines

Hi! I’m Kawei, an AI assistant to help you to colorize any kinds of manga. Following my instruction, you can transform any manga you like into a full-colored one. Even without any painting experience, without any color knowledges, without any professional software skills, you can master the color of arbitrary black-and-white manga (or called comic) by follow this tutorial step by step. All you need to do is to select a few colors and mark where will be colorized, I’ll do all the rest.
MangaCraft
MangaCraft
github.com
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Discovery could explain failed clinical trials for Alzheimer's, and provide a solution

_PET scan of a human brain with Alzheimer's disease. Credit: public domain
Researchers at King's College London have discovered a vicious feedback loop underlying brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease which may explain why so many drug trials have failed. The study also identifies a clinically approved drug which breaks the vicious cycle and protects against memory-loss in animal models of Alzheimer's. Overproduction of the protein beta-amyloid is strongly linked to development of Alzheimer's disease but many drugs targeting beta-amyloid have failed in clinical trials. Beta-amyloid attacks and destroys synapses—the connections between nerve cells in the brain—resulting in memory problems, dementia and ultimately death. In the new study, published in Translational Psychiatry, researchers found that when beta-amyloid destroys a synapse, the nerve cells make more beta-amyloid driving yet more synapses to be destroyed. "We show that a vicious positive feedback loop exists in which beta-amyloid drives its own production," says senior author Dr. Richard Killick from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). "We think that once this feedback loop gets out of control it is too late for drugs which target beta-amyloid to be effective, and this could explain why so many Alzheimer's drug trials have failed."_
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New insights into the way the brain combines memories to solve problems

Humans have the ability to creatively combine their memories to solve problems and draw new insights, a process that depends on memories for specific events known as episodic memory. But although episodic memory has been extensively studied in the past, current theories do not easily explain how people can use their episodic memories to arrive at these novel insights. Results from a team of neuroscientists and artificial intelligence researchers at DeepMind, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), publishing in the journal Neuron on September 19, provide a window into the way the human brain connects individual episodic memories to solve problems. For example, imagine you see a woman driving a car on your street. The next day, you see a man driving the exact same car on your street. This might trigger the memory of the woman you saw the day before, and you might reason that the pair live together, given that they share a car. The researchers propose a novel brain mechanism that would allow retrieved memories to trigger the retrieval of further, related memories in this way. This mechanism allows the retrieval of multiple linked memories, which then enable the brain to create new kinds of insights like these.
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On Creativity, Objectives, and Open - Endedness
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The brain predicts words before they are pronounced

_The Primary Auditory Cortex is highlighted in magenta, and has been known to interact with all areas highlighted on this neural map. Credit: Wikipedia.
The brain is not only able to finish the sentences of others: A study by the Basque research centre BCBL has shown for the first time that it can also anticipate an auditory stimulus and determine the phonemes and specific words the speaker is going to pronounce. Prediction is one of the main neuro-cognitive mechanisms of the brain. Every millisecond, the brain tries to actively anticipate what will happen next depending on the knowledge it has of its environment._
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Deeper Conversations, Happier Life?

While small talk does have its uses not least making that awkward elevator ride slightly less awkward research has highlighted something that will have introverts and fans of deep discussions rejoicing. People who spend more of their time engaging in deep, meaningful conversations and less time on small talk appear to be happier. This is according to Matthias Mehl, a psychologist at the University of Arizona who published a study on the subject. Published in the journal of Psychological Science, the study had 79 college students agree to wear an electronically activated recorder that recorded 30-second snippets of their conversation every 12.5 minutes for four days. Researchers went through the tapes and labeled the conversations as either small talk (weather, TV shows), or more substantive talk that could range from talking about things that were really impacting the speakers’ lives to philosophy and the role of education. The subjects then had their level of satisfaction and happiness analyzed through self-reports they completed a Satisfaction with Life Scale and “a single item happiness measure” twice, three weeks apart as well as reports from two to three people who knew them. Small talk accounted for only 10 per cent of the happiest person’s conversation. The unhappiest person in the study was shown to partake in almost three times as much small talk - 28.3 per cent. The other subjects also showed a correlation between having more substantive (deep) conversations and being happier.
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Preserving Outputs Precisely while Adaptively Rescaling Targets

Multi-task learning - allowing a single agent to learn how to solve many different tasks - is a longstanding objective for artificial intelligence research. Recently, there has been a lot of excellent progress, with agents like DQN able to use the same algorithm to learn to play multiple games including Breakout and Pong. These algorithms were used to train individual expert agents for each task. As artificial intelligence research advances to more complex real world domains, building a single general agent - as opposed to multiple expert agents - to learn to perform multiple tasks will be crucial. However, so far, this has proven to be a significant challenge.
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Dietary fiber reduces brain inflammation during aging

As mammals age, immune cells in the brain known as microglia become chronically inflamed. In this state, they produce chemicals known to impair cognitive and motor function. That's one explanation for why memory fades and other brain functions decline during old age. But, according to a new study, there may be a remedy to delay the inevitable: dietary fiber.
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