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Law Offices of Thomas C. Mooney
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Maryland adopts tough new DUI law
Take a look at this article about Maryland's recently enacted Noah's Law, which makes ignition interlock devices mandatory for anybody convicted of drunk driving or for refusing a breathalyzer test. The tough law, which came into effect in October, means that even first-time offenders could be forced to install an ignition interlock on their vehicles. In addition to requiring drivers to perform breath tests in order to drive, the devices are also a costly expense.

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Prince George's County men arrested for gun and drug crimes

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The rights of motorists at Maryland DUI checkpoints
Take a look at this article about DUI checkpoints in Maryland. Read more to learn what rights drivers have at such stops. Law enforcement officers may ask drivers questions, or request that they perform field sobriety tests, when they are stopped at DUI checkpoints. While they may feel obligated to acquiesce to the authorities’ requests, drivers do not have to speak with law enforcement or perform such tests. Refusing to submit to chemical testing, however, is considered a separate offense from drunk driving, and thus, carries additional penalties. By understanding their rights, drivers may avoid being unnecessarily arrested.

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Less Severe Low-Level Drug Offense Laws Proposed in Maryland
Check out this article about potential changes to Maryland laws on low-level drug offenses. Legislators have recently passed bills that would change the legality of paraphernalia, the standards in asset forfeiture cases and the penalties for certain low-level offenses. Learn more about these changes and their potential impacts on criminal cases involving drug-related charges.

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Names removed from registry after court ruling
Take a look at this article about the impact a 2013 Court of Appeals ruling in Maryland has had on that state’s sex offender registry. The court ruled that requiring offenders to register despite having been convicted before the registry existed was unconstitutional. Since the ruling, hundreds of names have been removed from the list. While politicians have decried the court’s decision, others point out that the registry has had no proven impact on public safety and only makes it difficult for offenders to reintegrate into society.
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