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Anthony Nicholson
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How many women can you name who have both a supercomputer and a U.S Navy destroyer named after them? Grace Hopper—who we’re celebrating with a doodle today in the U.S.—is one. “Amazing Grace”’s contributions to computer science made her a pioneer in the field. She created the first compiler for a programming language and led the development of COBOL, the first modern programming language. Happy 107th birthday to Grace Hopper!
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And now for those NOT following the birth of the British prince...a word from one of my favourite funny pages.
I'm just like, oh-kate with this.
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Incredible:

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We have long pushed for transparency so users can better understand the extent to which governments request their data—and Google was the first company to release numbers for National Security Letters. However, greater transparency is needed, so today we have petitioned the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to allow us to publish aggregate numbers of national security requests, including FISA disclosures, separately. Lumping national security requests together with criminal requests—as some companies have been permitted to do—would be a backward step for our users.

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herp derp

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A cockatiel whistling the theme song to My Neighbor Totoro?  Don't mind if I do!

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The best career decision I made was going into technology -- its a fast growing field, filled with opportunity and fun.  Girls/women - there are not enough of us joining the technology industry.  Whatever stage of your career or studies you are in, consider joining the technology field and help us build the future.  

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This morning we sent a letter to the offices of the Attorney General and the Federal Bureau of Investigation asking the government to allow Google to publish more national security requests for data. Read the full letter on our blog: http://g.co/j3u5

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Finally, this episode confirms what we have long believed—there needs to be a more transparent approach.... the level of secrecy around the current legal procedures undermines the freedoms we all cherish.
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Dear Google users—

You may be aware of press reports alleging that Internet companies have joined a secret U.S. government program called PRISM to give the National Security Agency direct access to our servers. As Google’s CEO and Chief Legal Officer, we wanted you to have the facts.

First, we have not joined any program that would give the U.S. government—or any other government—direct access to our servers. Indeed, the U.S. government does not have direct access or a “back door” to the information stored in our data centers. We had not heard of a program called PRISM until yesterday.

Second, we provide user data to governments only in accordance with the law. Our legal team reviews each and every request, and frequently pushes back when requests are overly broad or don’t follow the correct process. Press reports that suggest that Google is providing open-ended access to our users’ data are false, period. Until this week’s reports, we had never heard of the broad type of order that Verizon received—an order that appears to have required them to hand over millions of users’ call records. We were very surprised to learn that such broad orders exist. Any suggestion that Google is disclosing information about our users’ Internet activity on such a scale is completely false. 

Finally, this episode confirms what we have long believed—there needs to be a more transparent approach. Google has worked hard, within the confines of the current laws, to be open about the data requests we receive. We post this information on our Transparency Report whenever possible. We were the first company to do this. And, of course, we understand that the U.S. and other governments need to take action to protect their citizens’ safety—including sometimes by using surveillance. But the level of secrecy around the current legal procedures undermines the freedoms we all cherish.

Posted by Larry Page, CEO and David Drummond, Chief Legal Officer
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