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we'rengineering
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We're changing the way people see Engineering
We're changing the way people see Engineering

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The Oculus, New York City
Here the architect Santiago Calatrava merges his engineering and structural design skills with artistic sensitivity to create an exceptionally light and elegant structure. Today, thanks to 3D CAD and CNC machining, it is possible to create exceptionally complex organic forms which just 15-20 years ago would have been almost impossible to execute.
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we're changing the way people see engineering: COMING SOON
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we'rengineering - your insight into the people and spirit of engineering.

We're working with companies to help change the way people see engineering.
Here is Westcut UK precision and product development engineers. Many more coming soon.
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As Dyson goes from strength to strength the company continues to invest substantially in research and development, sadly not always in the United Kingdom.

Despite offering excellent working conditions, a competitive salary, operating in an area where housing is relatively affordable and with a work ethic which recognises that failure is part of the learning curve Dyson cannot find sufficient young engineers. It is setting up a complete R&D facility in Singapore.

In the UK 4% of graduates are engineers, in Singapore 40% of graduates are engineers.

Dyson is a prime example of an innovative engineering business that is successful in the global market. It creates revenue for the nation and gives employment to thousands of people both directly and indirectly.

The UK needs more such companies if we are to maintain both our quality of life and our standing in the international arena. Ours however is a culture which now seems to encourage the young to follow the softer values of life such as Law, Media and Social studies.

But as American Richard Lamm has said “All we know about the new economic world tells us that nations which train engineers will prevail over those which train lawyers. No nation has ever sued its way to greatness. ”
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As Dyson goes from strength to strength the company continues to invest substantially in research and development, sadly not always in the United Kingdom.

Despite offering excellent working conditions, a competitive salary, operating in an area where housing is relatively affordable and with a work ethic which recognises that failure is part of the learning curve Dyson cannot find sufficient young engineers. It is setting up a complete R&D facility in Singapore.

In the UK 4% of graduates are engineers, in Singapore 40% of graduates are engineers.

Dyson is a prime example of an innovative engineering business that is successful in the global market. It creates revenue for the nation and gives employment to thousands of people both directly and indirectly.

The UK needs more such companies if we are to maintain both our quality of life and our standing in the international arena. Ours however is a culture which now seems to encourage the young to follow the softer values of life such as Law, Media and Social studies.

But as American Richard Lamm has said “All we know about the new economic world tells us that nations which train engineers will prevail over those which train lawyers. No nation has ever sued its way to greatness. ”

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If a cluster of images were to sum up the impact engineering has had on life today it must surely be the stunning shots of London taken by aerial photographer Jason Hawkes.

Here we see an encapsulation of modern urban life with every aspect down to the creativity and effort of engineers. The buildings old and new, the transport systems, the infrastructure, the power, the communications, the vehicles and even the means by which the photographs were taken all down to engineering yet at the same time all taken for granted as the wheels of commerce churn.
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It was a school visit to Stansted airport that first got a 14 year old John Wheal thinking about all of the complex systems that must work together to make air travel possible.

Systems that keep us, and our luggage all safe as we fly off on holiday or business to destinations around the world.


Now he's a systems engineer with the National Air Transport Services, or NATS, as part of a team designing and building the next generation of air traffic control systems. And when those systems are the basis for the safety of 250 million air passengers every year, it's vital that John and the team get it right.

“Since joining NATS I have been able to build on the technical knowledge that I learnt in my degree course and apply it to a real-world problem in a unique, safety critical environment.



John joined NATS as an Engineering Graduate in 2016 after completing his Masters degree in Computer Engineering at the University of Portsmouth.

So next time you board a plane setting off on holiday or look up to see aircraft flying across the skies just give a thought to John and his colleagues at NATS who ensure that each flight takes the right route and arrives safely at its destination.

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