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Ilana Goor Museum
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Today Ilana has been interviewed by a French TV team. Updates on the broadcast will follow soon!
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אלה גורן המוכשרת אוחזת בפרס בו זכתה בעקבות מפגש רישום במוזיאון: 300 ש"ח לקניות בארטא!
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יפהפיה ויחידה במינה. שרשרת "מלכת השבט"- רק בחנות מוזיאון אילנה גור.
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From Ilana Goor Gallery
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http://www.ilanagoor.com/eng/Collections/Creations-by-Space-Room/Upper-Level-Passage/ The Upper Level Passage on the museum's second floor displays a selection of contemporary Israeli art, especially art produced by promising young artists such as Hadas Levy, Roi Pajursky, Dudy Dayan and others. Alongside these works, you will find the creations of established artists such as Yigal Tumarkin and Miriam Bat Yosef. A magnificent, ancient chandelier that formerly adorned a mosque in Egypt and was brought to Israel by Ilana Goor piecemeal, hangs from the central ceiling and illuminates the floor with a bluish tint. This area is the very core of the museum from which one can see and experience most of the rooms and collections. The wide range of works of arts in this area includes portraits drawn with different techniques, which appear to be gazing at the comings and goings in the museum. The atrium – which is shaped like a balcony with an iron banister designed by Goor and decorated with bronze birds – provides visitors with a relaxing break and an opportunity to contemplate an inner landscape of a different nature.
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Upper Level Passage | Ilana Goor Museum (12 photos)
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http://www.ilanagoor.com/eng/Collections/Creations-by-Space-Room/Sculpture-Garden/ The Sculpture Garden is located on the Museum's roof. It is surrounded by a breathtaking view of the // shoreline, which is considered to be on one of Israel's most enchanting landscapes. The garden features large sculptures by various artists, including David Zandelowitz’s- Portrait of Jack Lifshitz, Richard Stankiewicz and Ilana Goor. The garden offers comfortable seating areas in the shade of olive trees and other fruits and flowers native to Israel, as well as authentic carpenter-made chairs and tables that served primary schools before Goor appropriated them. They allow visitors to delight in the hypnotizing quiet and tranquility of this unique garden and enjoy a welcome pause. As its name indicates, the garden features large sculptures of various forms, some of which are made of bronze, some of different metal parts, flails, ploughs and even millstones carefully placed side by side. Most of the sculptures have a direct affinity with nature and that is why they were chosen for the Sculpture Garden. The blend of the sculptures with the nature surrounding them creates an interesting interaction with the sky and sea of blue.
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Sculpture Garden | Ilana Goor Museum (12 photos)
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http://www.ilanagoor.com/eng/Collections/Creations-by-Space-Room/Monks-Room/ The Monks’ Room is located on the first floor of the Ilana Goor Museum. It is named after two ancient monks’ tables, rare in their form, 300 years old, which Ilana Goor found in an abandoned monastery in Greece. They serve as a platform for a particularly large piece of work by Ilana Goor called “The Morning After” and it relates to the cycles of life and death by means of skulls, leftover food, insects and animal organs. This room includes works by Ilana Goor and other Israeli and international artists such as Anna Goebel, Yosef Constant, Josef Albers and more. The two monks’ tables which are located in the center of the room are made of one tree trunk without joints and without affixations; this is the source of their rarity and they are characterized by a narrow and long appearance. The reason for this shape is derived from the fact that the monks do not take enjoyment from food, but rather it is considered as a means for existence and therefore the table is not a comfortable and spacious surface for a lot of foodstuffs. Tens of works in bronze by Ilana Goor are placed on the tables. They include insects and reptiles who give the appearance of climbing over each other and the food utensils and gnawing through the leftovers of those who are already gone. Furniture designed by the artist integrating leather and wood is set up around the tables together with 150-year old Egyptian ploughs that Ilana found during her stay in Egypt and converted to benches. Some of the works hanging on the walls correspond with the colorfulness of the principal work called “The Morning After” and they balance the drama prevailing in this space.
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Monks Room | Ilana Goor Museum (12 photos)
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http://www.ilanagoor.com/eng/Collections/Creations-by-Space-Room/Miniatures-Room/ The Miniatures Room bears the name of its collection of miniature art pieces organized in the center of the room on separate stands. This room is considered to be the most impressive one in the museum thanks to the juxtaposition of works by Ilana Goor alongside international artists such as Diego Giacometti, Henry Moore, Alexander Archipenko and Israeli artists such as Yitzhak Danziger, Uzi Katzav and Uri Lifshitz. The perforated ceiling above complements the room's unique character and constitutes one of the more fascinating architectural elements which the 18th century building has to offer. The amphora ceiling was made using the "beehive" technique in which amphorae (ancient ceramic vase-shaped containers originating in Ancient Greece) were stored in order to support its weight and insulate it from heat and cold. Now their lace texture fits in with the room's overall artistic appearance. The miniatures room overlooks the Mediterranean sea and the Old Jaffa port – an area where thousands of amphorae that served to build ceilings using the beehive technique in previous centuries were found. Thus a conceptual link was created between the place the museum visitors occupy and the landscape they view.
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Miniatures Room | Ilana Goor Museum (12 photos)
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