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Jason Lutes
1,134 followers -
Cartoonist, teacher, game designer
Cartoonist, teacher, game designer

1,134 followers
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In 1994, I had the nutty idea to write and draw a 600-page comic book about life during the Weimar Republic. I was 27 years old, and I thought to myself, "If I can maintain this level of productivity, I'll finish by the time I'm 40!"

Next week I turn 50. Today I drew the last page of my comic book about life during the Weimar Republic.
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Here's our Freebooters session from yesterday for anyone who's interested. Thanks to +Andrew Huffaker, +Jeremy Strandberg, +Jennifer Erixon, and +Horst Wurst for deploying their formidable RP skills!

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Freebooters over Hangouts
I was slated to run a game of Freebooters at Gauntlet Con but had to cancel. We've finally rescheduled to this Wednesday, November 29, 11am-3pm EST, but most of the original players can't make it, so at this point I'm looking for 2-3 more folks. Let me know if you're interested!
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Look at this amazing thing. Some interesting systems and great ideas from various PbtA games, polished to a high gloss. 190-page free preview!
Interested in trying a gritty-ish, PbtA-inspired fantasy RPG that supports GM-less play?

Ironsworn began as a PbtA reskin, but it's evolved into something I would say is more PbtA-adjacent. I call it "Inspired by and borrowing liberally from the Apocalypse” (IbaBLftA?). It's built on moves, but leverages ala carte character creation with printable asset cards instead of playbooks. It's also got it's own flavor of dice mechanics and some resource tracking mechanisms. Finally, it's built from the ground up to support solo and co-op GM-less campaigns.

The preview edition is a complete, free game. I'd love to hear what people think.

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An incredible resource for quick settlement generation.

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That feeling when you wake up realizing you wiped down the rental car but forgot to remove the license plates, compounded by anxiety over the fact that more importantly—idiot—you should have filed off the VIN numbers too. Maybe you can make it back to that spot on the highway before the cops get there? Lying awake for a solid half hour, trying to figure out how to undo the fact that you killed someone, wracked not with guilt but with the feeling that you've crossed a line, done something that can never be undone, and you're going to feel this anxiety for the rest of your life.

And then going back over your summer to figure out when you committed the act among all the other things on your calendar and realizing, with a sense of profound relief—Hey, I didn't actually kill anyone!

Dear unconscious, what are you trying to tell me?
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Prep Porn
Ready for session #2! This is what the NPC count looks like for a crew of 7 PCs. They've already wound up a number of off-camera clocks and I'm looking forward to seeing what happens when they tick down.
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Sidney Sime's work stands apart from that of pretty much any other "fantasy" artist, but look at this thing. It's like the most proto- of proto-D&D illustrations.

A towering, shadowy ruin. A broken stairway bridged by a makeshift ladder. A group of three armed people struggling to hold a door shut in order to keep out some monstrous humanoid. A strange altar holding a mysterious book. A bored sphinx. A treasure chest, just out of reach. A dead figure (the unfortunate fourth of the adventuring party?), surrounded by bloody bird tracks and implements of torture or extraction.

Some of the details are more fully explained in "The House of the Sphinx," the story by Lord Dunsany (http://doyleandmacdonald.com/d_sphinx.htm) which accompanied this illustration (as opposed to the other way round, since Dunsany would sometimes apparently write stories based on drawings that Sime made).

This drawing was published in 1912, and it's like blueprint for Gygax & Arneson's later creation. I also wouldn't be surprised if it was the inspiration for that one passage from Tolkien's description of the battle for the Chamber of Mazarbul:

Heavy feet were heard in the corridor. Boromir flung himself against the door and heaved it to; then he wedged it with broken sword-blades and splinters of wood. The Company retreated to the other side of the chamber. But they had no chance to fly yet. There was a blow on the door that made it quiver; and then it began to grind slowly open, driving back the wedges. A huge arm and shoulder, with a dark skin of greenish scales, was thrust through the widening gap. Then a great, flat, toeless foot was forced through below. There was a dead silence outside.
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Played a fun game of Freebooters on the Frontier via Hangouts last night. My goal was to try to deliver a solid 4-hour game, but it stretched out to nearly 5. Have to pare down my approach, maybe set a limit at 3 players?

Thanks to +David Perry, +Horst Wurst, +Jeremy Strandberg, and +John Marron for bringing their respective A-games. Any GM who gets one of you at their table should consider themselves lucky (like I do).
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