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Cairns Veterinary Clinic
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Can you find your pooch here?
Fascinating family tree of dogs.
#dogs   #genetics   #evolution   #dogbreeds  
How dogs evolved. This is fascinating! It makes sense that the wild wolves today are very different from the original wolves that humans domesticated. If Richard Dawkins/Jared Diamond have taught me anything, it's that it is very rare for a modern species to have "evolved" from another modern species. Rather, the two species share a common ancestor.

For instance, humans and chimpanzees share 98.8% of our DNA, but humans did not evolve from chimps. There's a common ancestor many millions of years ago, with the exact date in question amongst scientists: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chimpanzee%E2%80%93human_last_common_ancestor.
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Cruciate Ligament Repairs in dogs
TightRope Cruciate Ligament Surgery
Cruciate Ligament Surgery in dogs using Arthrex Tightrope CCL system.
Cruciate Ligament Injuries are the most common cause of lameness in dogs. 
Dogs with torn cruciate ligaments can't walk without pain for months, and the joint instability leads to chronic arthritis. The ligament can't be repaired, but vets can help these dogs by inserting an artificial ligament which supports the joint.
The Arthrex Tightrope CCL implant is a very strong artificial ligament made of a kevlar like material which is anchored securely using bone tunnels. Compared with other cruciate ligament surgical procedures it is less invasive and It has been shown to give good results, even in large dogs. The Arthrex tightrope system is widely used in human joint surgeries such as knee and ankle procedures
Read more about the Arthrex tightrope cruciate ligament surgery system  http://cairnsvet.com.au/tightrope-cruciate-repair-surgery/
#cruciatesurgery   #cruciateligament   #dogs   #veterinarysurgery   

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Toxic foods that can kill your pet
There are many foods which are safe for humans to eat which can be deadly for your pet.
Protect your furry friends by learning what not to feed them.
For example, did you know that grapes and avocadoes can cause serious illness in your pet?
Great infographic from +Southern Animal Referral Centre 
#pets   #dogs   #cats   #veterinary  
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Cranial Cruciate Ligament
Understanding the leading cause of lameness in dogs - cranial cruciate ligament rupture.
http://cairnsvet.com.au/cranial-cruciate-ligament/
#cruciateligament   #cruciatesurgery   #veterinarysurgery  
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What would the world's most pet friendly house look like?
This is an interesting project which examines how we live with pets, and how to make it work better for everyone.
#pets   #homeimprovement   #animals  
http://www.professorshouse.com/project/#!
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Canine Cruciate Ligament Rupture and Repair
Cruciate Ligament Injuries are perhaps the most common cause of serious lameness in dogs.
If your dogs starts limping on a hind leg without an obvious external injury, it might be a torn cruciate ligament

What is the Cranial Cruciate Ligament?
The knee (or stifle) joint of dogs and cats is similar to that of humans.  In the knee joint, the tibia (shin bone) is attached to the femur (thigh bone) by ligaments which allow free bending movement in one axis, but prevent the joint from moving or bending in the wrong way.  One of these ligaments, the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL), prevents the tibia from moving forward with respect to the femur (direction A). Another ligament, the caudal cruciate ligament crosses (cruciate means cross) over the CCL preventing movement in direction B.  Without these ligaments, the bones in the knee would slide around during activity, damaging their surfaces and surrounding soft tissues.
How is the CCL damaged?
The CCL is regularly injured in dogs (and people).  Sometimes this occurs in an accident or miss-step (such as a dog or footballer turning quickly or landing badly while running at high speed) but in many dogs it occurs during fairly normal activity, such as jumping on the couch or while playing ball. It is thought that in these dogs, the shape of the bones in the knee joint puts excess strain on the cruciate ligament, causing weakening and eventual rupture.  Existing stifle joint problems such as dislocating patella (knee cap), arthritis, damaged CCL in other leg and also obesity increase the risk of CCL rupture.

http://cairnsvet.com.au/cranial-cruciate-ligament-rupture-surgery/

#cruciateligament   #caninecruciateligament #cruciatesurgery   #dogs  
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Best Friends always Stick Together
If you've got a dog who is getting up to mischief, one of the best ways to keep them entertained is to get another dog.
Of course, if you can't help getting into trouble, you might as well get into trouble together!
http://cairnsvet.com.au/dogs/
#dogsareawesome   #friendship  
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The secret life of cats
#caturday  
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World's oldest horse dies: age 51
Almost 120 in "human Years, Shayne was 15 hands high and lived on a diet of sugar beet and chaff with cabbage for treats.
Shayne, a liver chestnut Irish Draught cross thoroughbred, spent his retirement years at a horse sanctuary.

Shayne's reducing mobility prompted the decision to put him to sleep.
The oldest horse of all time was 'Old Billy' who was foaled in Woolston, Lancashire and had reached the age of 62 when he died in 1822.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2288910/Worlds-oldest-horse-trots-final-furlong-Irish-draught-Shayne-51-sleep-Essex-sanctuary-reaching-120-human-years.html#ixzz2hQJ5wjWK 
#horses   #vets  
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2013-10-11
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