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richard berrios
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Consumer Awareness Tips on Finding Codes and Regulations in Hawaii.
Consumer Awareness Tips on Finding Codes and Regulations in Hawaii.

www.hawaiifiredoors.com

808-943-1425

An excellent place to be able to view codes is your local library. Look in the Government section. When researching Uniform Building Codes, search t...

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Consumer Awareness Tips on Finding Codes and Regulations in Hawaii.

www.hawaiifiredoors.com
 
808-943-1425

An excellent place to be able to view codes is your local library. Look in the Government section. When researching Uniform Building Codes, search the chapter titled Means of Egress. Read the chapter titled Means of Egress when researching the Uniform Fire Code. Codes are not normally displayed in their complete form on the Internet.

Since the building and fire codes have to be ratified by each state, there will be different year building and fire codes for each state. This is because the codes cannot be implemented until they are adopted and time has been provided for the inspectors to get up to speed.

Contact Hawaii Fire Doors.com

Hawaiifiredoors.com Fire Door Inspection Services include, at a minimum:

Annual Fire Door Inspections
Fire Door Code Compliance
Completing and Performing Statement of Conditions

*Inspect the Door & Door Frame
*Perform an Operational test on the Door – (Swing Test; Close Test; Latch Test; Electric Door *Release; Door Bottom Drag; Door Frame Rub; Door Edge Overlap; Coordinator Malfunction)
*Inspection of Hinge Assemblies
*Inspection of Door Bolts & Locks
*Inspect all Fire Exit Hardware
*Inspect and Verify – (Thresholds/Saddle; Clearance, Astragal and Gaskets, Kick-Down Door *Holder, Wedge and Door Stop, Protection Plate, Signage properly installed)

DOCUMENTATION AVAILABILITY 24 HOURS A DAY

www.hawaiifiredoors.com
 
808-943-1425

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Consumer Awareness Tips on Door Closers & Door Controls in Hawaii Ne
Consumer Awareness Tips on Door Closers & Door Controls in Hawaii Ne

www.transponderkeyshawaii.com

808-943-1425

The most important thing about door closers has nothing to do with the closers themselves. Before installing, servicing or adjusting a door c...

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Consumer Awareness Tips on Door Closers & Door Controls in Hawaii Ne

www.transponderkeyshawaii.com
 
808-943-1425

The most important thing about door closers has nothing to do with the closers themselves. Before installing, servicing or adjusting a door closer, make certain the hinges are properly lubricated, the hinge screws are tight and the door closes smoothly and latches properly. If the door is not operating properly, no door closer will be able to solve the problems.

The purpose of a door closer is to close and latch the door under controlled operation every time, preventing slamming and minimizing the sounds that occur as the door is closing. For the purpose of this article, we will only discuss swinging door closers including overhead concealed, surface mounted and floor closers.

Door closing equipment has been around for well over 100 years. Some of the original products are still sold today, such as spring hinges, springs, weights, door checks and door closers. An early Norton closer has the name “Door Check” manufactured into the arms.

Door closers come in different applications, configurations, sizes and shapes. They can be mounted into the floor beneath the door, into the header area above the door, and surface mounted onto the face of the door. Each type of door closer has its advantages and disadvantages.

Most architects install concealed door closers on the public exterior doors of a building because of the aesthetics.

Early pot (traditional) closers would wind up the clock-style spring as the door is being opened. The spring would unwind as the door is closing. To control the closing speed, the spring would drive a piston, forcing fluid through orifices in the cylinder. Many pot closers have two holes in different positions. The first, larger hole would permit faster movement (sweep speed). The second, smaller hole closer to the end of the travel, created sufficient force to close and secure the door (latch speed). Without fluid, the spring would expand rapidly and the door would slam.

The standard “streamline” or modern surface-mounted door closer operates using fluid in a rack-and-pinion spring-loaded piston mechanism. When the door is opened, the arm assembly rotates a geared spindle that moves a gear driven piston, compressing the main spring and forcing fluid into the area previously occupied by the piston. The spring pressure increases as the door is opened. The farther the door is opened, the greater the spring pressure. As the door is closing, the spring expands and exerts pressure on the piston. As the piston moves back, fluid is forced back to the area surrounding the spring. The valves that control the movement of the fluid as the spring expands determine controlled opening and closing of the door. If fluid is permitted to move too quickly, the door will slam. If fluid is restricted too much, the door will not close and latch.

www.transponderkeyshawaii.com
 
808-943-1425

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Consumer Awareness Tips on....
Installing Locking Devices on Fire Doors

www.hawaiifiredoors.com
 
808-943-1425


Dealing with Fire Doors is a critical activity of locksmiths especially when deploying access control. This is because converting the means of how the door locks and unlocks will be changed from a strictly mechanical operation to one which will involve electronic controls and electrical activation.

Fire doors are considered to be assemblies, comprised of several components: the lockset, door closer and electric releasing device included.

The Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) will be very interested in knowing how the new hardware will affect the fire stopping properties of the door, and how the new hardware will affect egress through the door. However, the AHJ will not care at all about how effectively the door will control access into the premises, unless there is a code requirement regarding gaining entry in an emergency. In other words, the AHJ addresses the Life Safety issues and not the Security issues.

Access controlled doors which are along the means of egress are focal points for AHJs. Therefore, getting them right should be your mission as a professional locksmith.

In our age of specialization and misplaced priorities, frequently you will have to deal with integrators who do not understand locks, architects whose main concerns relate to aesthetics, and building owners who seem to care only about costs.

Take also into account that people will be assuming the exits will be operable in an emergency. It is your moral and professional responsibility to do whatever is within your power to assure they are.

A fire door should normally be closed and latched, and it should permit free egress at all times. Although the exceptions to these rules are what make designing access a little interesting and fun, assuring that the rest of the situations where there the exceptions do not apply are the job.

New revisions to NFPA 80 (NFPA 80 2010) will become effective soon, and many jurisdictions will adapt them into their building code. Codes are the Law, and ignorance of the law is not a defense.

If you are dealing with a wood fire door assembly, you might want to consider using an electrified lever. Electrified levers provide an aesthetic solution which provides the same egress capabilities of the original lockset. However they also require wiring of the door.

Drilling through a door without altering its fire rating can be performed by either removing the door and shipping it to a shop authorized to do this, or by someone with Perfect Raceway Certification.
www.hawaiifiredoors.com
 

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Installing locking Devices on Fire Doors
Consumer Awareness Tips on....
Installing Locking Devices on Fire Doors

www.hawaiifiredoors.com

808-943-1425


Dealing with Fire Doors is a critical activity of locksmiths especially when deploying access control. This is because converting the means of ...

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Fire Door Inspection – Top 5 Deficiencies
Consumer Awareness Tips.......

Fire Door Inspection – Top 5 Deficiencies

www.hawaiifiredoors.com

808-943-1425

As more jurisdictions adopt the 2009 International Fire Code (IFC), the 2009 edition of NFPA 101 – The Life Safety Code, or other codes which ...

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Consumer Awareness Tips.......

Fire Door Inspection – Top 5 Deficiencies

www.hawaiifiredoors.com
 
808-943-1425

As more jurisdictions adopt the 2009 International Fire Code (IFC), the 2009 edition of NFPA 101 – The Life Safety Code, or other codes which reference the 2007 or 2010 edition of NFPA 80 – Standard for Fire Doors and Other Opening Protectives, more attention is being focused on fire doors and egress doors.
Fire door assemblies and certain egress doors must be inspected annually per these publications, and any deficiencies found must be corrected without delay.


1. Painted or missing fire door labels

The label found on the edge or top of a fire door and in the rabbet of a fire-rated frame may be made of metal, paper, or plastic, or may be stamped or diecast into the door or frame. Labels must be visible and legible. Some embossed labels can still be read if they are painted, but if a painted label is illegible, the paint must be removed. If labels are missing or can’t be made legible, the Authority Having Jurisdiction may require the doors or frames to be re-labeled by a listing agency.

2. Poor clearance dimensions around the perimeter of the door in the closed position

The maximum clearance allowed by NFPA 80 between a fire door and the frame at the head, jambs, and meeting stiles of pairs is 1/8” for wood doors, and 3/16” for hollow metal doors. The maximum clearance at the bottom of the door is ¾” between the bottom of the door and the top of the flooring or threshold. Prior to the 2007 edition, NFPA 80 included a variable requirement for the undercut, depending on the type of flooring.

For clearances larger than allowed by NFPA 80, there are gasketing products in development which may be allowed by the listing agencies as an alternative to replacing the door. Shimming the hinges with metal shims may help to correct the problem, and there are metal edges available which are listed for use when a door needs to be increased in width to reduce the clearance.

3. Kick-down door holders

A kick-down door holder is a simple mechanical device which is mounted on the bottom corner of the door and flips down to hold the door open. Because fire doors must be self-closing or automatic-closing (there are a few exceptions), a kick-down holder is not an acceptable way of holding open a fire door. A mechanical hold-open feature in a door closer and other types of hold-opens such as wedges, hooks, and overhead holders are not allowed for fire doors either.

An automatic-closing fire door is held open electronically, and closes upon fire alarm. This may be accomplished with a wall- or floor-mounted magnetic holder, a closer-holder unit which receives a signal from the fire alarm system or incorporates its own smoke detector, or a separate hold-open unit which is paired with a standard door closer. There is also a battery-operated hold-open available which can be used in some retrofit applications.

Existing fire doors may be equipped with fusible link closer arms, which incorporate a fusible link that is intended to melt during a fire and release the hold-open. Current building and life-safety codes do not allow fusible link arms on doors in a means of egress, because they do not allow the doors to control the spread of smoke. Automatic-closing doors must be initiated by the fire alarm system or smoke detection.

4. Auxiliary hardware items that interfere with the intended function of the door

These auxiliary items may include creative ways of holding open the door or providing additional security. In many cases the auxiliary items create an egress problem, for example, additional locks or surface bolts (most egress doors must unlatch with one operation), chains or creative devices used with panic hardware, or electronic access control products that have not been installed with the required release devices for code compliance. Hardware used on fire doors must be listed for that use, and items not listed for use on a fire door must be removed. Holes left by the removal of auxiliary items must be filled in accordance with NFPA 80, typically either with steel fasteners, or with the same material as the door or frame.

Field preparation for these auxiliary items may also create a problem on fire doors. NFPA 80 limits job site preparation of fire doors to holes for surface-applied hardware, function holes for mortise locks, and holes for labeled viewers. The maximum hole diameter is 1”, except holes for cylinders which may be any diameter. Protection plates may be field-installed, and wood and composite doors may be undercut in the field a maximum of ¾” (check with the door manufacturer first). Field modifications beyond what is allowed by NFPA 80 may void the label and require re-labeling of the assembly.

5. Fire doors blocked to stay in the open position

If a fire door is not able to close, it can’t compartmentalize the building and prevent the spread of fire and smoke. Fire doors are typically blocked open for the convenience of the building’s occupants. Many people don’t understand the function of fire doors, and may compromise life safety without realizing the results of their actions. Educating facilities staff and the building’s occupants on fire door requirements can help to avoid a problem, and/or a fine from the local fire marshal.


Aloha & Mahalo
Richard Berrios Sr.
Fire Door Inspector / Locksmith
Fire Doors Hawaii.com
www.hawaiifiredoors.com
 



Affordable Locksmith & Son LLC
808-943-1425
www.affordablelocksmithandsons.com
 




Hawaiifiredoors.com Fire Door Inspection Services include, at a minimum:

Annual Fire Door Inspections
Fire Door Code Compliance
Completing and Performing Statement of Conditions

*Inspect the Door & Door Frame
*Perform an Operational test on the Door – (Swing Test; Close Test; Latch Test; Electric Door *Release; Door Bottom Drag; Door Frame Rub; Door Edge Overlap; Coordinator Malfunction)
*Inspection of Hinge Assemblies
*Inspection of Door Bolts & Locks
*Inspect all Fire Exit Hardware
*Inspect and Verify – (Thresholds/Saddle; Clearance, Astragal and Gaskets, Kick-Down Door *Holder, Wedge and Door Stop, Protection Plate, Signage properly installed)

DOCUMENTATION AVAILABILITY 24 HOURS A DAY

Contact us .....
We do inspections right!
Affordable Locksmith & Son LLC
808-943-1425
www.affordablelocksmithandsons.com
 

Post has attachment
Consumer Awareness Tips.......

Fire Door Inspection – Top 5 Deficiencies

www.hawaiifiredoors.com
 
808-943-1425

As more jurisdictions adopt the 2009 International Fire Code (IFC), the 2009 edition of NFPA 101 – The Life Safety Code, or other codes which reference the 2007 or 2010 edition of NFPA 80 – Standard for Fire Doors and Other Opening Protectives, more attention is being focused on fire doors and egress doors.
Fire door assemblies and certain egress doors must be inspected annually per these publications, and any deficiencies found must be corrected without delay.


1. Painted or missing fire door labels

The label found on the edge or top of a fire door and in the rabbet of a fire-rated frame may be made of metal, paper, or plastic, or may be stamped or diecast into the door or frame. Labels must be visible and legible. Some embossed labels can still be read if they are painted, but if a painted label is illegible, the paint must be removed. If labels are missing or can’t be made legible, the Authority Having Jurisdiction may require the doors or frames to be re-labeled by a listing agency.

2. Poor clearance dimensions around the perimeter of the door in the closed position

The maximum clearance allowed by NFPA 80 between a fire door and the frame at the head, jambs, and meeting stiles of pairs is 1/8” for wood doors, and 3/16” for hollow metal doors. The maximum clearance at the bottom of the door is ¾” between the bottom of the door and the top of the flooring or threshold. Prior to the 2007 edition, NFPA 80 included a variable requirement for the undercut, depending on the type of flooring.

For clearances larger than allowed by NFPA 80, there are gasketing products in development which may be allowed by the listing agencies as an alternative to replacing the door. Shimming the hinges with metal shims may help to correct the problem, and there are metal edges available which are listed for use when a door needs to be increased in width to reduce the clearance.

3. Kick-down door holders

A kick-down door holder is a simple mechanical device which is mounted on the bottom corner of the door and flips down to hold the door open. Because fire doors must be self-closing or automatic-closing (there are a few exceptions), a kick-down holder is not an acceptable way of holding open a fire door. A mechanical hold-open feature in a door closer and other types of hold-opens such as wedges, hooks, and overhead holders are not allowed for fire doors either.

An automatic-closing fire door is held open electronically, and closes upon fire alarm. This may be accomplished with a wall- or floor-mounted magnetic holder, a closer-holder unit which receives a signal from the fire alarm system or incorporates its own smoke detector, or a separate hold-open unit which is paired with a standard door closer. There is also a battery-operated hold-open available which can be used in some retrofit applications.

Existing fire doors may be equipped with fusible link closer arms, which incorporate a fusible link that is intended to melt during a fire and release the hold-open. Current building and life-safety codes do not allow fusible link arms on doors in a means of egress, because they do not allow the doors to control the spread of smoke. Automatic-closing doors must be initiated by the fire alarm system or smoke detection.

4. Auxiliary hardware items that interfere with the intended function of the door

These auxiliary items may include creative ways of holding open the door or providing additional security. In many cases the auxiliary items create an egress problem, for example, additional locks or surface bolts (most egress doors must unlatch with one operation), chains or creative devices used with panic hardware, or electronic access control products that have not been installed with the required release devices for code compliance. Hardware used on fire doors must be listed for that use, and items not listed for use on a fire door must be removed. Holes left by the removal of auxiliary items must be filled in accordance with NFPA 80, typically either with steel fasteners, or with the same material as the door or frame.

Field preparation for these auxiliary items may also create a problem on fire doors. NFPA 80 limits job site preparation of fire doors to holes for surface-applied hardware, function holes for mortise locks, and holes for labeled viewers. The maximum hole diameter is 1”, except holes for cylinders which may be any diameter. Protection plates may be field-installed, and wood and composite doors may be undercut in the field a maximum of ¾” (check with the door manufacturer first). Field modifications beyond what is allowed by NFPA 80 may void the label and require re-labeling of the assembly.

5. Fire doors blocked to stay in the open position

If a fire door is not able to close, it can’t compartmentalize the building and prevent the spread of fire and smoke. Fire doors are typically blocked open for the convenience of the building’s occupants. Many people don’t understand the function of fire doors, and may compromise life safety without realizing the results of their actions. Educating facilities staff and the building’s occupants on fire door requirements can help to avoid a problem, and/or a fine from the local fire marshal.


Aloha & Mahalo
Richard Berrios Sr.
Fire Door Inspector / Locksmith
Fire Doors Hawaii.com
www.hawaiifiredoors.com
 



Affordable Locksmith & Son LLC
808-943-1425
www.affordablelocksmithandsons.com
 




Hawaiifiredoors.com Fire Door Inspection Services include, at a minimum:

Annual Fire Door Inspections
Fire Door Code Compliance
Completing and Performing Statement of Conditions

*Inspect the Door & Door Frame
*Perform an Operational test on the Door – (Swing Test; Close Test; Latch Test; Electric Door *Release; Door Bottom Drag; Door Frame Rub; Door Edge Overlap; Coordinator Malfunction)
*Inspection of Hinge Assemblies
*Inspection of Door Bolts & Locks
*Inspect all Fire Exit Hardware
*Inspect and Verify – (Thresholds/Saddle; Clearance, Astragal and Gaskets, Kick-Down Door *Holder, Wedge and Door Stop, Protection Plate, Signage properly installed)

DOCUMENTATION AVAILABILITY 24 HOURS A DAY

Contact us .....
We do inspections right!
Affordable Locksmith & Son LLC
808-943-1425
www.affordablelocksmithandsons.com
 

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A Wake-Up Call for the Locksmith Industry!!
Consumer Awareness Tips - Certified Professional Locksmith's in Hawaii.
A Wake-Up Call for the Locksmith Industry!!

www.gsa-x09-lkmlocksmithhawaii.com



The terms, “asleep at the switch” and “asleep at the wheel” arose from 19th-century American railroad...
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