Profile

Cover photo
Sitaram Chamarty
568 followers|212,319 views
AboutPosts

Stream

Sitaram Chamarty

Shared publicly  - 
 
https://tech.slashdot.org/story/16/03/17/2318228/why-buses-need-to-be-more-dangerous

In other words, make them be like buses in India, except perhaps the crowding.  Wow...
HughPickens.com writes: Is there such a thing as being too safe? Jeff Kaufman writes that buses are much safer than cars, by about a factor of 67 but buses are not very popular and one of the main reasons is that if you look at situations where people who can afford private transit take mass transit...
2
Thomas Rast's profile photo
 
Funny how he trades safety of public transport users for speed of public transport. I'd trade in speed/capacity of personal transport instead (at least where net overall capacity increases).

Things like bus lanes, preferential treatment of bus/tram at lights, tram priority in all situations except lights, etc.
Add a comment...

Sitaram Chamarty

Shared publicly  - 
 
The logic is outrageous: "People got shot. So we need a backdoor into your phone."
    -- https://medium.com/@jamesallworth/the-u-s-has-gone-f-ing-mad-52e525f76447#.9z0l63tlv
5
1
Phil Hord's profile photoMarc-André Laverdière's profile photoEugene E. Kashpureff Jr (EugeneKay)'s profile photoSitaram Chamarty's profile photo
4 comments
 
+Phil Hord
Yup.  And we all know "guns don't kill people, phones kill people" ;-)
Add a comment...

Sitaram Chamarty

Shared publicly  - 
 
http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2016/02/02/safe_harbor_replaced_with_privacy_shield/

I was going to write a summary and say "yeah right, and the moon is made of blue cheese" or something weird but this comment (http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2016/02/02/safe_harbor_replaced_with_privacy_shield/#c_2766772 ) says it much better:

*Europe* Are you spying on us?
*USA* No way.
*Europe* Oh goody. No problem then
*Snowden* They have been spying on you. Here's the proof
*Europe* Naughty USA. You said you weren't spying on us and you were!
*USA* Yes. Sorry. We lied. But we won't do it again
*Europe* Promise?
*USA* Sure!
*Europe* That's all right then.
4
Bhaskar Chowdhury's profile photoBehan Webster's profile photoSitaram Chamarty's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Behan Webster true, but the spying we expect is on government, military, possibly industry, also, etc., not world+dog :-)
Add a comment...

Sitaram Chamarty

Shared publicly  - 
 
I tried to run the test code for CVE-2016-0728.

Machine just crashed.  Completely unresponsive with heavy disk activity.

More importantly, it got very hot -- an attacker can't run this without me noticing (modulo lunch breaks etc., when I leave the machine up).

Come to think of it, my old laptop would have been even better.  It had a thermal problem where something would wrongly report the temperature and it would basically just die if the temperature crossed some not-that-high value!
1
Eugene E. Kashpureff Jr (EugeneKay)'s profile photoJeff Mitchell's profile photoSitaram Chamarty's profile photo
4 comments
 
+Eugene E. Kashpureff Jr
EEK (nice initials by the way; can't believe I didn't notice all these months/years!): the exploit is designed to overflow a 32-bit counter so it will take time.  Despite what I said, a user who is expected to stay logged in for days can easily slow down this attack a bit more and eventually make it work :)
Add a comment...

Sitaram Chamarty

Shared publicly  - 
 
https://theintercept.com/2014/07/23/blacklisted/

I have not looked at the actual PDF yet but what I see here is absolutely crazy stuff!  Some quotes:

> The new guidelines allow individuals to be designated as representatives of terror organizations without any evidence they are actually connected to such organizations, and it gives a single White House official the unilateral authority to place entire “categories” of people the government is tracking onto the no fly and selectee lists.

> It reveals a confounding and convoluted system filled with exceptions to its own rules, and it relies on the elastic concept of “reasonable suspicion” as a standard for determining whether someone is a possible threat.

----

Being more interested in computer security, I've been much more focused on the police-state implications of the Snowden side of the story, never really paying attention to this aspect, but this is far worse!

(But then, we've seen recently somewhere that apparently drinking tea could get you busted for drug trafficking.  Maybe coffee can be labelled terrorist action, and you can get 90% of the US population on the no-fly list!!)
The watchlist system now requires neither “concrete facts” nor “irrefutable evidence” to designate you a terrorist. <!--more-->
3
Eugene E. Kashpureff Jr (EugeneKay)'s profile photo
 
That'd really speed up the lines at the airport for us tea-drinkers.
Add a comment...

Sitaram Chamarty

Shared publicly  - 
 
Hah!  Mozilla finally admits the Pocket integration had a financial motive.

https://soylentnews.org/article.pl?sid=15/12/07/2053231

(Note: I did not read the linked article, just the summary)

So now... you can't even believe what they say next time.  Just wait a while and they'll say something else!

Is this really a FOSS project?

I am just glad all the people (friends and family network) I evangelised FF to and installed FF for over the last few years are not tech-savvy enough to even know all this and ask me embarrassing questions!
Mozilla Admits Financial Benefits of Pocket Integration -- article related to News and The Main Page.
6
Bhaskar Chowdhury's profile photoEugene E. Kashpureff Jr (EugeneKay)'s profile photoSitaram Chamarty's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Eugene E. Kashpureff Jr
Reminds me of something similar I have been saying for the last year or two: I would rather risk getting hacked by a cyber-criminal than allow the government (any government) to get my data.  The cyber criminal's motives are clear!
Add a comment...

Sitaram Chamarty

Shared publicly  - 
 
oh good lord; I didn't read past the first para but this is terrible.  (And thank God I refuse to use Chrome or even Chromium, the latter because it is too closely tied to a proprietary product).

http://labs.detectify.com/post/133528218381/chrome-extensions-aka-total-absence-of-privacy
TL;DR, Popular Google Chrome extensions are constantly tracking you per default, making it very difficult or impossible for you to opt-out. These extensions will receive your complete browsing...
1
Cris Fuhrman's profile photoMarc-André Laverdière's profile photoSitaram Chamarty's profile photo
7 comments
 
+Marc-André Laverdière
Yes but it can only point to one extension that caused a problem.  Despite my antipathy to Firefox now, you can't deny that historically FF has a much better record on privacy.

Google certainly does care about security but if they started caring about privacy they'd be out of business.
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
568 people
Noel Kalonga's profile photo
Tim Henigan's profile photo
Devang Raval's profile photo
Alex Eiswirth's profile photo
abhijeet vaidya's profile photo
Rikesh Sharma's profile photo
Javier Domingo Cansino (txomon)'s profile photo
Anand Meyyappan's profile photo
Jon Ciesla's profile photo

Sitaram Chamarty

Shared publicly  - 
 
5
Andrew Latham's profile photoCaleb Cushing's profile photoSitaram Chamarty's profile photoMichael Gebetsroither's profile photo
5 comments
 
Thx for the tip!
Add a comment...

Sitaram Chamarty

Shared publicly  - 
 
http://go.theregister.com/feed/www.theregister.co.uk/2016/02/10/andreessen_and_modem_snatchers_india_facebook_free_basics/

his tweet: Leap of net neutrality from "carriers shall not charge some content more" to "poor people shall not get free partial Internet" = astounding.

Umm, "free partial internet" is a bit like saying the Indian Ocean is a little wet.  Try "free, very very very small part of the internet, closed-off, no privacy, all-your-data-are-belong-to-us".

And that's not even going into the whole fallacy of who these poor are.   The ones who are really really poor don't have a mobile anyway; this is all meaningless to them.

There are a few (several?) NGOs (like Swaminathan Foundation etc) that are trying to bring the internet to entire villages using "Village Knowledge Centers" [and similar]; much better than shoveling facebook and its partners' junk to individuals.

I suspect the combined budget of these NGOs is a few percent of what FB spent on advertising this bullshit (I believe they had FULL PAGE ads in all our newspapers, running several days, and God knows what else they did!)

If the amount they spent on propaganda does not tell people what this is really about, nothing will.
Don't you DARE call us paternalistic. We've got people to NANNY
1
Add a comment...

Sitaram Chamarty

Shared publicly  - 
 
Too many bloody quantum crypto doomsayers these days... the acads do it because they get grants, the ones who are selling crypto do it because they can sell all kinds of stuff saying "quantum safe".

My gut feel (from what I have read of the physics of this, not that I'm any good at that!): this is not going to happen in any of our lifetimes.  Even the younger ones among us.  There's a good chance it may never happen too.  So stop getting suckered by "quantum safe crypto".

It's far more likely that traditional computing will start making inroads into RSA-2048 than quantum will manage it.

(Yes, I know NIST also raised a red flag on this.  Phhhhtttt!)
1
Caleb Cushing's profile photo
 
Phhhtttt, I have already cracked quantum crypto. https://xkcd.com/538/
Add a comment...

Sitaram Chamarty

Shared publicly  - 
10
Add a comment...

Sitaram Chamarty

Shared publicly  - 
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=coFIEH3vXPw ("Run containers on bare metal already!") is the first time I have felt that the now-standard format -or- of showing the slides clearly in about 80% of the frame, with the video of the speaker a small insert on the side, is a bit lacking.

Watch it and you'll see what I mean.  This guy's energy level, his expressions, his segues into side topics, his explosive rants... well worth watching!
6
Marc-André Laverdière's profile photo
 
I made a mental note about their cloud offering. This looks very sweet in theory - remove all the need to manage anything - just dump your container in there and let 'em take care of it.
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
568 people
Noel Kalonga's profile photo
Tim Henigan's profile photo
Devang Raval's profile photo
Alex Eiswirth's profile photo
abhijeet vaidya's profile photo
Rikesh Sharma's profile photo
Javier Domingo Cansino (txomon)'s profile photo
Anand Meyyappan's profile photo
Jon Ciesla's profile photo
Work
Occupation
aging geek, gitolite author (dayjob: TCS)
Contact Information
Home
Email
Story
Tagline
...one more monkey
Introduction
Sitaram Chamarty (keywords to determine if I'm the Sitaram you're looking for: CVS, GTS/MBR, ECK, ISICAL, TCS, Git, Gitolite.  The first 3 are not google-able -- you have to know me to know what they are; the rest are public)
Bragging rights
author of gitolite -- my only contribution to the open source world, which I've been leeching off of since 1995
Basic Information
Gender
Male