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Sean Keener
Works at BootsnAll Travel Network
Attended Loyola Academy
Lived in Chicago, Illinois
1,388 followers|28,429 views
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Sean Keener

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But is the notion that there are “rules” to follow actually ruining the travel experience?

We’ve all done it: scrolled through blogs, websites, and guidebooks looking for the smart traveler rules that will offer security and a sense of awareness to our journey. We buy money belts and practice our get-away-from-me-right-now scowls. But the truth about travel is that, like life, there simply is no formula and no amount of rules that could possibly fit every single scenario.

But we all know that. We all know that we make exceptions to those rules on a pretty regular basis. Why? Because judgement and circumstance come into play far more than most rule makers care to admit.
Is it possible that the
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Sean Keener

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If you've ever wondered what it might be like to be on a long-term trip, check out this piece by our friend David while in Tibet.
Join David Joshua Jennings in a Tibetan Settlement in south India for a average day in the life of a long-term traveler.
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Travel can provide an excellent education for any person, regardless of age. Many families with school-aged children are hesitant to hit the road for fear of how it will impact their education. Vickie Lillo and her husband have been taking advantage of their vacation time each year to travel and teach their son on the road. Below are 23 lessons that the Lillos have used to teach their son (and themselves!) while traveling. 
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Sean Keener

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One of my favorite reasons to justify anything - "Act like a kid again" - #107 on this list to Just Go.
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Sean Keener

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Then I caught up to the curve. I had a bit of a mid-life crisis, looked back and realized the party was half over, looked forward and realized that I really am standing at the top of the hill, and all of a sudden, I got it. I got a two handed grip on the fleetingness of life, the precariousness of relationships, the difficulty of balance, the importance of feeding my own soul, and the all-fire, hell and high water, burning passionate need to make damned sure I’m not wasting this time I’ve been given. There’s nothing quite like reaching the potential half way mark to cause a girl to reevaluate, reassess, and recommit to living and breathing her dreams.
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Sean Keener

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While coming home is definitely hard, there’s also the exciting side to it. You are excited to see everyone – your family, friends, co-workers (maybe) – and you are excited to eat and drink everything that you have missed in your time away. But all that – the honeymoon period of being home, the reverse culture shock, and re-entry – all fade away with time. For some it might only last a few months, but for others it can last a year or two. But after a while, most long-term travelers do get over their post-trip blues and excitement, and many settle into a largely normal life again.
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Have him in circles
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Sean Keener

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Of course REI is making a killing off of assuring you that you need the lightest possible water purifier and ultra-light, quick-dry undies. The reality is that 95% of those of us who backpack are carrying more than we need, because we want to. Because the extra items make us comfortable or happy in some way. Because we can.
Jenn Miller discusses the difference between packing your backpack for the average RTW and packing for an unsupported backpacking trip. She touches on why, most of the time, it doesn't really matter what you pack and why cutting the weight in your pack is less important than taking care of the most important piece of gear you possess.
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Sean Keener

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The vast majority of travelers we know, even those who have “life lists,” travel not to check things off but to have meaningful experiences – and that often equals having interactions with people along the way. Sometimes it’s meeting other travelers in the hostel common room, sometimes it’s having hand-gestures-only chats with the guy at the next cafe table, sometimes it’s falling in love (however briefly) with someone you didn’t know a week before, and sometimes it’s taking part in a community event like #Indie30 and connecting with someone who lives on the other side of the world as you. These connections can change the course of your travels, and, indeed, your life – if you let them.
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Sean Keener

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It's simple, a Daily Travel Article for those who love or want todo long-term travel.   

We started this newsletter in 2000 or so. 
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Sean Keener

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Just because summer might be ending in one part of the world doesn’t mean it’s not beach season somewhere else. Just like it’s always 5 o’clock somewhere for happy hour, similarly it’s always beach season somewhere in the world. 
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We've been chasing summer for the past year :-) We are off to Lapland in March though! Time to stock up on winter clothes :-p
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Sean Keener

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It sounds arrogant, doesn’t it? The insinuation being that who you were before was “worse” in some way. Or maybe some people who haven’t traveled will read that and assume that the underlying assumption is that those who travel are better than those who don’t, or that I’m making a value judgement based on my preferred lifestyle which automatically denigrates theirs.

My assertion here that travel will make you a better person is not arrogant, and if it strikes you that way, please hear me out.

If there is one thing that my travels continue to underscore, it is that pride is my biggest struggle and arrogance lurks just below the surface. Every time the discussion devolves into “us” and “them” or my thought process struggles with a reality elsewhere, the solution to which seems so “simple” to my “Western” way of thinking, I am reminded that I have work to do. Travel is nothing if not a continual and painful lesson in humility. 
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Thanks mate.  It's my purpose, and I hope my kids learn these lessons one day as well.   Good vibes to you and your tribe!
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Sean Keener

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Turning twenty is a milestone. It’s the point at which real adulthood is beginning and you’re standing on a mountaintop looking out over a landscape at sunrise. The view from the top is spectacular. There is excitement about where the road is leading, just out of sight around a sharp bend, snatches of it become visible before the golden band disappears over the horizon. You can’t wait to get going, and so you begin to run.

You’re hard into your schooling, and then your career path. Your supporters on the sidelines cheer. You’re off to such a great start; you’re making fabulous progress. You buy a car, meet a partner, and buy a house at the top of a low rise. It feels good. You’re getting there. Lowering your head you push onward with purpose: pay off school debt, have a kid or four, work on your master’s degree – run, run, run!

And then you stop at the bottom of the steep hill where you turn thirty, or thirty-five, or maybe even forty, panting for breath. You stop to stretch, have some water and take a look around, thinking, “Huh, I don’t remember seeing this from the top of the mountain? How did I get here? How the heck am I going to climb that hill? No one warned me about this hill.”
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And we keep on running :-) 
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Have him in circles
1,388 people
Adam Seper's profile photo
Andrew Nystrom's profile photo
Camilla Cavallini's profile photo
Lisa Ellen Niver's profile photo
Work
Occupation
CEO and Entreprenuer
Employment
  • BootsnAll Travel Network
    CEO, 1998 - present
  • AirTreks
    CEO, 2013 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Chicago, Illinois - Dekalb, Illinois - Brisbane, Australia - Eugene, Oregon - Portland, Oregon - Snowden, Washington - Ohope Beach, New Zealand - Mammoth Springs, Wyoming
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Student, Traveller, Father, Husband, Friend, Community Member and Entreprenuer
Education
  • Loyola Academy
    N/A, 1987 - 1991
  • Northern Illinois University
    General Studies, 1991 - 1995
  • University of Queensland
    Independent Studies, 1994 - 1994
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Male
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Married