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Brendan Foley
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“You cannot teach killing is wrong by killing.”
This applies elsewhere as well.

From this brief bit though, I get the impression the Governor is really much more concerned about police than about children, he's just using the children angle because it's more popular. Many mass shootings at schools (and in general) end in the shooter committing suicide or getting shot by police or others anyway, so I doubt the death penalty will be much of deterrent.

Why the police need such additional threat force, particularly in a state riddled with accusations of excessive force abuses by police resulting in many dying at their hands anyway (and a known trend that if you kill police you probably won't make it to trial anyway), I don't know. Maybe he thinks it will calm the police down if they have some hope an arrested cop killer will die even if they don't do it themselves?
Chicago, Ill., May 16, 2018 / 12:09 am (CNA/EWTN News).- The Catholic Conference of Illinois decried the governor’s call to re-establish the death penalty, which has not been used in the state in nearly 20 years. “We are distressed and alarmed by Gov. Bruce Rauner’s call for the reinstatement of the death penalty in any way, shape or form,” the conference said in a May 14 statement. “We are all God’s children, and our first – and primary – right to life must always be protected and unconditional.” On Monday, Governor Rauner encouraged lawmakers to reinstate capital punishment in Illinois for individuals convicted of mass murder or the death of a police officer. “Anyone who deliberately kills a law enforcement officer or is a mass murderer deserves the death penalty,” he wrote to the Illinois House of Representatives. The recommendation came in an amendatory veto message for House Bill 1468, which would require a 72-hour waiting period before an assault weapon is purchased. The governor cited child safety as his reason for wanting to reintroduce the death penalty. He drew attention to several recent attacks in U.S. schools. “There is nothing more precious than our children, and they deserve to be safe and cared for at school,” he said. Last month, an Illinois task force was created to map out a defense against school violence. Governor Rauner said the death penalty should only be used in cases where an individual is guilty “beyond all doubt” rather than the often-used standard of “beyond a reasonable doubt.” He said this would help avoid wrongful convictions, such as those that contributed to the abolishment of the state’s death penalty. However, the Catholic Conference rejected the idea of reinstating the death penalty in certain cases “beyond all doubt” instead of “beyond a reasonable doubt,” saying that this distinction “is simply parsing words.” “You cannot teach killing is wrong by killing.” The death penalty has not been used in Illinois since 1999. Then-governor George Ryan issued a moratorium on the practice in 2000, following a report in the Chicago Tribune detailing flaws in the state’s capital punishment system. The report said that the system was “so riddled with faulty evidence, unscrupulous trial tactics and legal incompetence that justice has been forsaken.” Among other problems, the newspaper pointed to inaccurate juries, incompetent defending lawyers, and unreliable forensic tests. These were among the errors that occurred with 12 wrongfully convicted death row inmates who were later exonerated, the article stated. Before leaving office in 2003, Governor Ryan commuted the death sentences of more than 160 death row inmates. In 2011, the death penalty was abolished in Illinois by then-governor Pat Quinn.  
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While I far prefer Bruce Dickinson Era(s) Iron Maiden (like most fans), there are some good points even in the Blaze Bayley era of the band. This was certainly a low time for the band, and I very rarely listen to the albums from that time, but honestly even bad Maiden albums tend to be better than most other albums out there.

That's all a long way of saying Futureal from the album Virtual XI has been randomly stuck in my head the last several days, and so now I'm listening to the album, and you can too!

https://open.spotify.com/album/2DUVk4Us4v1qZtOI05mA4b
Virtual XI
Virtual XI
open.spotify.com
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“The importance of Christ-centered and shared repetition in our collaborative mission as the Church requires that we avoid the addition of words or gestures that are alien to the rites and liturgical texts provided us by the Church,” said Bishop Michael Olson of Ft. Worth, Texas.

“Even though such liturgical abuses might at first glance appear to begin as good willed efforts to avoid redundancy and tedium for a people with attention spans made numb by contemporary modes of communication, such efforts remain destructive because they take us away from the repetition that bears fruit in Catholic unity,” he continued.

...

While fidelity to the liturgy may not always be received with “a favorable response” and may lead to rejection, Olson said that fidelity to the Church’s liturgical texts “grounds us effectively in Christ.”

I sometimes wonder if those who favor deviation from the norms are missing the point that this isn't meant to be focused on us, but rather on God, or perhaps themselves aren't taking the whole thing seriously enough (perhaps due to lack of personal faith either in the reality of the rites themselves or, in some instances, in the Divine Realities they refer to.) I'd expect in most cases small deviation is a matter of simpler misunderstanding or a result of misapplications of some more complicated ideas (honest mistakes, bad training, communication breakdown, whatever), but from time to time I hear or read people that just seem like there's more to it and make me wonder.

But, I also find there are just generally a lot of people that do not think rules and laws are all that important and think those of us that take them seriously are strange. I've never been able to understand how that thinking works.


https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/bishop-olson-liturgical-fidelity-fosters-unity-discipleship-18340?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=gplus
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There are a few disturbing bits about this whole thing:
1) The idea that Apple would be able to crack it's own encryption to begin with is problematic.
2) The FBI trying to compel another company and lying to Congress to force the matter for breaking encryption
3) That the FBI, and apparently several 'vendors' had already been working on breaking this encryption for months and were close to doing so (and presumably have by now), indicating the encryption methods are at least no longer viable within a couple years and there are many groups close to the products willing to help break it open.

Probably some more stuff.
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I'm finding in my explorations of actually more popular corners of the internet that people seem to be way too comfortable with ephebophilia. This seems to be especially the case when the victim is a male and the perpetrator a female (even a much, much older female). This goes to rather appaulling extents when said victim tries to come out about it and the popular response is: "nice!" or "well, did you like it? If so, nice!" or just "what's the problem here?". They will even boo down anyone trying to console the person or declaring the matter is statutory rape (which it is in the entire English speaking world as far as I can tell, and most of the non-English speaking world).
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This is kinda old at this point but... eh, I'll put it out there as people like to keep talking about it.

While the net neutrality rule applies to those ISPs that hold themselves out as neutral, indiscriminate conduits to internet content, the converse is also true: the rule does not apply to an ISP holding itself out as providing something other than a neutral, indiscriminate pathway—i.e., an ISP making sufficiently clear to potential customers that it provides a filtered service involving the ISP’s exercise of “editorial intervention.” Id.For instance, Alamo Broadband, the lone broadband provider that raises a First Amendment challenge to the rule, posits the example of an ISP wishing to provide access solely to “family friendly websites.” Alamo Pet. Reh’g 5. Such an ISP, as long as it represents itself as engaging in editorial intervention of that kind, would fall outside the rule....The Order thus specifies that an ISP remains “free tooffer ‘edited’ services” without becoming subject to the rule’s requirements.

^ Under the 2015 OIO ("Net Neutrality") rules, if you tell the customer you are going to edit the services at signup, you are no longer subject to the rules against it.

It goes on:

That would be true of an ISP that offers subscribers a curated experience by blocking websites lying beyond a specified field of content (e.g., family friendly websites). It would also be true of an ISP that engages in other forms of editorial intervention, such as throttling of certain applications chosen by the ISP, or filtering of content into fast (and slow)
lanes based on the ISP’s commercial interests. An ISP would need to make adequately clear its intention to provide “edited services” of that kind,
id. ¶ 556, so as to avoid giving consumers a mistaken impression that they would enjoy indiscriminate “access to all content available on the Internet, without the editorial intervention of their broadband
provider,”id.¶ 549. It would not be enough under the Order, for instance, for “consumer permission” to be “buried in a service plan—the threats of consumer deception and confusion are simply too great.”

^They can also engage in throttling with the same provisions, but they need to be very upfront about it apparently. The court also claims no one is refuting these abilities in the court:

There is no need in this case to scrutinize the exact manner in which a
broadband provider could render the FCC’s Order inapplicable by advertising to consumers that it offers an edited service rather than an unfiltered pathway. No party disputes that an ISP could do so if it wished, and no ISP has suggested an interest in doing so in this court. _

It goes on to explain why ISPs reasonably wouldn't actually _want to do this to begin with (consumer retention, competition, etc), but also to outline several ways in which ISPs could change their service to fall outside of the regulations (all of which are transforming the services into specifically what everyone is afraid they would become without the regulation).

The provisions about needing to be upfront about what they are doing, by the way, were at least initially retained as a rule in the new regulations.

https://apps.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-344654A1.pdf
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Well, that's an interesting way to teach an AI. I wonder what this kind of thing will end up doing to speed runs and high score tables, as this can figure out the ideal runs now even capitalizing on exploits no one knows about yet (and a lot of speed runs already use exploits in some versions).
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“Something that we have not formally announced yet is that we have begun to start serving widows in China. We have elderly widows that have nobody to support them that are leading lives of grinding poverty and hopelessness that we have extended our hands to and said ‘we’re going to support you,’” said Littlejohn.
...
“The Chinese Communist Party expected more of a baby boom with the loosening up of the birth limit to two children and they have not experienced the births that they thought that they were going to experience,” explained Littlejohn, “and so my question to them is ‘why are you keeping any coercive population control in place at all?’ They should be giving people incentives to have children and not limiting births at all.”

An exemplary group dealing with a terrible problem. Also illustrates some of the far reaching effects of ignoring the dignity of life in one area, and how real pro-life efforts are both not about just one issue, nor is that issue isolated from other concerns to begin with.
Washington D.C., Feb 25, 2018 / 04:07 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Although China expanded its former one child policy to a limit of two children per family in 2015, decades of government-enforced population control have left China with significant gender and age imbalances that have far reaching societal consequences, including a rise in sex trafficking and elderly suicide, according to a Chinese pro-life advocate. “There are an estimated 37 million more males living in China than females. What that has done is it has created a situation in China in which there is sex-trafficking within China and the surrounding countries as well, where women and girls become forced brides or prostitutes because of the lack of women in China,” the president of Women’s Rights Without Frontiers Reggie Littlejohn told CNA. Littlejohn, who founded Women’s Rights Without Frontiers as an aid and advocacy organization in response to “forced abortion, forced sterilization, sex-selective abortion of baby girls under the one child policy,” is now seeking to address the unanticipated consequences of population control. “Right now the problem in China is not that they have too many people. It is that they have too few young people to support their rapidly aging population and, even under the two child policy, they are not getting the baby boom that they need to help with that situation or to help with the fact that their labor force is now declining,” according to Littlejohn. The human rights advocate has seen the impact on the ground of this dramatic demographic shift, and is concerned about societal effect on the human dignity of the elderly. “There is a steep rise in senior suicide in China,” explained Littlejohn, “historically, elderly people depended on having a large family that will support them in their old age and now a lot of them don’t have anyone to support them and now they are killing themselves in good numbers.” In China, the suicide rate for the over-65 age group is four to five times higher than the general population according to a study in the American journal Aging and Disease. “Something that we have not formally announced yet is that we have begun to start serving widows in China. We have elderly widows that have nobody to support them that are leading lives of grinding poverty and hopelessness that we have extended our hands to and said ‘we’re going to support you,’” said Littlejohn. In her work with the elderly, Littlejohn’s team encountered one woman who exemplified the great need among China’s senior population. The woman told Littlejohn that “some days she only ate salt and she had bought a rope to hang herself with when life got too tough.” “These women are just grateful beyond any measure for the help that we are giving them. And, it doesn’t cost that much to support an elderly widow in China. We give them the American equivalent of $20 a month and it makes the difference between eating salt for a meal and actually having real food,” according to Littlejohn. “The Chinese Communist Party expected more of a baby boom with the loosening up of the birth limit to two children and they have not experienced the births that they thought that they were going to experience,” explained Littlejohn, “and so my question to them is ‘why are you keeping any coercive population control in place at all?’ They should be giving people incentives to have children and not limiting births at all.” In addition to the pro-life group’s expansion to aiding elderly widows, the majority of Women’s Rights Without Frontiers’ efforts are still dedicated to crisis pregnancies in China. “[The] two-child policy is not an abandonment of coercive population control in China,” according to Littlejohn. “Single mothers are still subject to forced abortion and third children are still subject to forced abortion.” “We have a network on the ground in China where we are able to connect with women who are being pressured to selectively abort or abandon their babies because they are girls,” said Littlejohn. Littlejohn told CNA that this is the message her team extends to the pregnant Chinese women they encounter: “Please don’t abort or abandon your baby because she is a girl. She is a precious daughter. Girls are as good as boys. We will give you a monthly stipend for a year to empower you to keep your daughter.” Littlejohn says that this message and the monthly stipends have enabled her organization to save hundreds of baby girls. Littlejohn’s efforts in China inspired in part by her work with St. Teresa of Calcutta. “I worked with her for six weeks in Calcutta,” remembered Littlejohn, who assisted the Missionaries of Charity in the home for the dying and in caring for abandoned babies. “The way that she cared about every life, including lives of the most disabled, was a huge inspiration for me in saving baby girls in China and we hope to save baby girls in India as well.”  
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The size of the industry, coupled with rising minimum wages, has prompted a rush to create automation solutions in fast food.

Eventually, CaliBurger plans to use the robots, which cost about $60,000 per unit, to do things like toast buns and grill onions.

Hmmm, well I can see the incentive here. One of Caliburgers locations that actually lists hours of operation (most do not online and they have different hours in different places) is in Seattle. From what I can find, this company is less than 500 Employees, and I doubt they are giving benefits to line cooks (if they are, it should even out anyway), so the minimum wage (which they may or may not pay more to get better employees) is currently $14/hour (this will increase in the next few years, or could jump if the company grows to larger than 500 in the U.S.). The hours of operation show they run 12 hours 6 days a week and 11 hours 1 day a week.

That should work out to ~4,328 hours of operation a year (depending on number of Sundays (I accounted for 52). 4,328 x $14 = $60,592.

That means if this robot learns those extra skills and can replace a position (note, not and employee, as multiple employees may fill 1 position given the hours) at the restaurant, then it pays for itself in 1 year. There may be some added maintenance and electricity costs that I don't have enough information to calculate, but if it's over $592 / year, it's not likely to be over $60k / 2 years, which would mean by the end of year two the company is definitely saving money at that location.

That all said, it's unclear to me that flipping burgers, grilling buns and grilling onions would replace an entire position. I've seen some burger joints where they do have someone dedicated to just flipping burgers on the grill during peak times, but I've seen others where, at least during off times, the employee fills in for other tasks either while the grill is not running or during the couple minutes between flips. In the latter scenario, where this does not eliminate a position, it may simply increase what load can be handled, at which point the calculation is more complicated for the payoff.
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Well, I never heard of this one myself, but that may have been for the better it seems.

The meat was allegedly declared acceptable non-meat substance for Lent and Fridays by a papal bull issued by Pope St. Gregory the Great.

But, as it turns out, the bull doesn’t exist, and the whole story may be, well, bull itself.
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