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The +Mathematical Association of America was happy to host Howard University's EDGE Reunion Weekend at the MAA Carriage House !

Read more about the EDGE program here: http://bit.ly/1GyypbS 

#WomenInSTEM
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Hey
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Go for the hat trick! Head from Bridges Baltimore 2015: Mathematics, Music, Art, Architecture, and Culture (7/29–8/1) to MOVES Conference 2015 (8/2–8/4, moves.momath.org) & finish at #MAAthFest   (8/5–8/8).

Advance registration for MAA MathFest ends 6/30. Join 1600 (so far!) mathematicians, students, and teachers for the +Mathematical Association of America 's centennial celebration! http://bit.ly/MF15-register

Related events of interest http://www.maa.org/meetings/mathfest/general-information/related-events-of-interest 

#MAA100  
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2&0.6
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"People’s appreciation of game-changing new technologies frequently ignores the long, often twisting path that transforms an idea from fundamental discovery to practical application.  Those who pay for the national research agenda may not always be aware of the early and fundamental work that makes today’s technologies possible.  For example, it was basic research presented in a then-obscure scientific paper by Albert Einstein in 1917 that ultimately translated into the invention of laser technology four decades later.  The development of similarly groundbreaking technologies that promise to transform and improve our lives hinges on our investments in fundamental, curiosity-driven research today." 

Read the rest of the blog post by Jo Handelsman, Associate Director for Science at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and share your favorite stories and examples with the hashtag #BasicResearch
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value-neutral has the connotation of research based in Communalism and not in Vendetta or in form of oppressive Stratification.
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This summer, Jane Street is hosting the third annual Jane Street Women in STEM event, and we are inviting women between their senior year of high school and freshman year of college to spend a couple of days in our New York City headquarters to learn more about what we do. Students who are selected to attend this event will receive an in-depth look into the ways we use math, computer science and probability concepts in trading, as well as insight into the different roles that exist within our firm. Over the course of two days, participants will hear from and interact with various traders and technologists, and learn how they transitioned from their college concentrations in STEM fields to a career at Jane Street. 

Some highlights of the event include a talk from Sandor Lehoczky about selection bias and a panel of new hires explaining the different roles at Jane Street, including trading, software development, and quantitative research. We will also enjoy a few social events, which will provide another great opportunity to speak with Jane Street employees and the other women attending the event. 

Selected students will arrive in New York the evening of August 2nd and will depart the evening of August 4th. All travel to and from New York, housing and meal expenses will be covered by Jane Street. Our office is in the heart of the Financial District, and the hotel is approximately 2 blocks from our office. 

To apply, please email womeninstem@janestreet.com with a resume and a brief statement (250 words or less) that tells us about yourself and why you would like to attend. 

The deadline to apply for this event is Friday, July 3rd.  We will update you on your application status the week of July 6th. 

Jane Street is a quantitative trading firm that uses innovative technology, a scientific approach, and a deep understanding of markets to guide our business. We are a global liquidity provider and market maker, operating around the clock and around the globe, out of offices in New York, London and Hong Kong.

Founded in 2000, Jane Street employs over 400 people in offices in New York, London and Hong Kong. We are always recruiting top students and the environment at Jane Street is open, informal, intellectual and fun. The dress code is casual, the kitchen is stocked and discussions are always lively. Teaching and learning are central activities through classes, mentoring and discussion. 

If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to email womeninstem@janestreet.com Good luck with the application process and we hope to meet you soon!
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Where is that 
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Judith V. Grabiner will present "Where Sufficient Reason Isn’t Enough" as part of +Mathematical Association of America's Distinguished Lecture Series. 

Abstract: Euclid’s Elements is the most influential textbook in the history of western civilization, serving as a model of reasoning not only in mathematics but in philosophy, theology, and politics. But Euclid’s geometry rests on assumptions, and one of the assumptions—even from the beginning—didn’t seem self-evident. People kept trying to prove that assumption, and the ways they tried tell us a lot about the relationship between mathematics and society. Meanwhile, the unchallenged authority of the Euclidean ideal was used by people like Newton, Voltaire, Euler, and Lagrange to support the Enlightenment world view.

But in the nineteenth century, suddenly there were new non-Euclidean geometries. They challenged the authority of mathematics, undermined received ideas in philosophy and culture, and had a hand in the birth of modernism. Changes came not only from people like Gauss, Lobachevsky, Helmholtz, and Einstein, but also artists and philosophers. Looking at all of this will illustrate both how culture helps shape mathematics and how mathematics has shaped the modern world.

More information here: http://www.maa.org/meetings/calendar-events/DL-Grabiner 

Biography: Judith V. Grabiner is the Flora Sanborn Pitzer Professor of Mathematics at Pitzer College and an acclaimed historian of mathematics. The author of three books and many articles on the history of mathematics, Grabiner won the Mathematical Association of America’s 2014 Beckenbach Book Prize for A Historian Looks Back: The Calculus as Algebra and Selected Writings. She is an inaugural fellow of the American Mathematical Society and recipient of the MAA's Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo Award for Distinguished College or University Teaching of Mathematics, given to teachers whose influence reaches beyond their own institutions. She is the only four-time winner of the MAA’s Lester R. Ford Award for best article in American Mathematical Monthly. Grabiner’s numerous other awards include the Distinguished Teaching Award of the Southern California Section of the MAA and the Outstanding Professor Award from California State University, Dominguez Hills. She taught a DVD course on Mathematics, Philosophy and the “Real World” for The Great Courses lifelong learning company. Professor Grabiner earned her BS in mathematics at the University of Chicago and her PhD in the history of science from Harvard University. She has taught at UC Santa Barbara, Cal Sate L. A., UCLA, Pomona College, and Cal State Dominguez Hills before coming to Pitzer in 1985, and has been a visiting scholar at the Universities of Leeds, Edinburgh, Cambridge, and Copenhagen.
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Klloooo
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Arithmetic Algebra by @JamesTanton
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O 5.º termo da progressão aritmética seguinte é ...
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How many times can you fold a piece of paper to get to the moon? Mathematician and 2014 Leelavati Prize winner Adrián Paenza enjoys askin this and other questions to inspire public conversations about mathematics.

Paenza is presenting his lecture about mathematics education called “The Wrong Door” on Tuesday, July 7, at 6:30 p.m. at the Embassy of Argentina, 1600 New Hampshire Avenue, Washington, D.C. The lecture is hosted by the +Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and Embassy of Argentina, Washington, D.C.

More information here: http://bit.ly/1IOtQuG
How many times can you fold a piece of paper to get to the moon? Mathematician and 2014 Leelavati Prize winner Adrián Paenza enjoys askin this and other questions to inspire public conversations about mathematics. An Argentine science journalist and former mathematics professor, ...
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Manjul Bhargava, Princeton University, will present MAA Centennial Lecture 6, "Recent results toward the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer Conjecture," at MAA MathFest 2015 in Washington, D.C. 

Register for MAA MathFest at http://bit.ly/MF15-register 

Abstract: Over the past half-century, the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer Conjecture has become one of the most notoriously difficult unsolved problems in mathematics, and has been listed as one of the seven million-dollar "Millennium Prize Problems" of the Clay Mathematics Institute. In this talk, we describe the problem in elementary terms, and the surprising and beautiful ways in which it is related to several well-known open problems in number theory. Despite the difficulties in solving it, there is actually quite a bit known now towards the conjecture. We will give a survey of what is known – including several recent advances – and, finally, what remains to be done!

#MAAthFest #MAA100

Photo by Peter Murphy via Princeton Alumni Weekly.
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Celebrate the success of another MAA MathFest by joining us for the Closing Banquet. Back by popular demand, the MAA Players are proud to bring you MAA: The Musical! They'll tell the history of the +Mathematical Association of America in song and dance with their award-winning cast. (Okay, so they didn't win awards for singing or dancing, but surely good mathematical exposition counts for something, right?) Come join in the fun with Art Benjamin, Bud Brown, Annalisa Crannell, Alissa Crans, Joyati Debnath, Frank Farris, Leigh Lunsford, Jenny Quinn, Dave Smith, Tina Straley, Francis Su, Talithia Williams, and more! All are welcome, and Silver and Gold members will be honored during the program.

Advance registration ends 6/30 http://bit.ly/MF15-register
#maa10   #maathfest  
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congratulations to you all.
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Have them in circles
201,830 people
William johns's profile photo
The Miners- Minecraft And More!'s profile photo
Chavis Dake's profile photo
Debra Wright's profile photo
Collins Bruce's profile photo
joseph parks's profile photo
Patricia Wise's profile photo
Lino Antonelli's profile photo
Everett Gray's profile photo
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The largest professional society that focuses on mathematics accessible at the undergraduate level.
Introduction
The Mathematical Association of America is the largest professional society that focuses on mathematics accessible at the undergraduate level. Our members include university, college, and high school teachers; graduate and undergraduate students; pure and applied mathematicians; computer scientists; statisticians; and many others in academia, government, business, and industry. We welcome all who are interested in the mathematical sciences.

The mission of the MAA is "to advance the mathematical sciences, especially at the collegiate level." More about our mission can be found here