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Ground zero originally referred to the point on the ground immediately under an exploding atomic bomb. Because it is at the center of the explosion, ground zero is the point of greatest devastation. T...
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Could you have the entry about "Ground zero" (in this case) here instead of having us go to grammarist.com?
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Disinterested traditionally means having no stake in the matter. For example, when you are arguing with someone, you might bring in a disinterested third person to help settle the issue fairly. Uninte...
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Fora and forums are plurals of forum. The former conforms to the original Latin, which some people prefer, while others like the anglicized form. Neither is right or wrong. It is a matter of preferenc...
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All that is often an informal synonym of very or truly, especially in negative statements such as, “He is not all that great at tennis.” From this statement we can infer that “he” is supposedly a good...
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A misnomer is (1) a name that gives a misleading impression, or (2) a mistake in naming something. It's an old word with many centuries of use in English,1 and it is especially useful because it has n...
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For the noun denoting animals of the phylum Mollusca—which includes squid, octopuses, slugs, and snails—mollusk is the preferred spelling in North America, and mollusc is preferred throughout the rest...
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In American and Canadian English, the past participle of the verb get is usually gotten. For example, we might say, “I have gotten behind on my work,” or, “The book was not gotten easily.” Got is the ...
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Back in the day is an American idiom used to refer to an earlier time, especially one the speaker remembers fondly. Unlike similar phrases that state a more specific time—e.g., back in the days of dia...
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The new word facepalm, which refers to the gesture of putting one's hand over one's face, has a few uses. It's often an interjection expressing exasperation, especially in reaction to something confou...
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The verb lie has two sets of definitions. First, it refers to someone or something that reclines, rests in a horizontal position, or is situated in a specified place. Someone or something that does on...
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Voilà is the French-derived interjection meaning, literally, look there. In English, it's often used to call attention to a novel result or to something just completed. English speakers often pronounc...
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In the Biblical parable of the Prodigal Son, a son receives his inheritance and travels to a distant country, wastes all his money in wild extravagance, becomes desperately poor, returns to his father...
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Have them in circles
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Amazing Animal Picture's's profile photo
Donna Brown's profile photo
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Best Animal Photography's profile photo
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Bruce Webb's profile photo
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Brid's photography's profile photo
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Grammarist is a blog about English Grammar and usage.