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Mike Simonsen
Works at American Association of Variable Star Observers
Attended Michigan State University
Lives in Michigan
1,577 followers|805,770 views
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Mike Simonsen

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The New Supernovae Alphabet Soup
This is an update of the Simostronomy blog “Supernovae Alphabet Soup”
posted December 2011. Thanks to Brad Walter for the revised text. SN 2011fe aka PTF11kly Image: Wikipedia The International Astronomical Union (IAU) is the sole body responsible
for the o...
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Mike Simonsen

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How do the most massive stars explode? A new model of massive stars predicts new observational evidence.
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hope to hearing from you soon because i have more business to do with you so please send me ur Skype id or email id too
 
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Mike Simonsen

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This is the largest subsidence that has been observed in Iceland since measurements of the surface were begun over fifty years ago. 
The recent volcano eruptions in Iceland have created enormous circular depressions in two of the country’s glaciers.
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“ALMA has now given us the best view yet of a binary star system sporting protoplanetary discs  — and we find that the discs are mutually misaligned!” said Eric Jensen, an astronomer at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, USA.

The two stars in the HK Tauri system, which is located about 450 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Taurus (The Bull), are less than five million years old and separated by about 58 billion kilometres — this is 13 times the distance of Neptune from the Sun.
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have found wildly misaligned planet-forming gas discs around the two young stars in the binary system HK Tauri. These new ALMA observations provide the clearest picture ever of protoplanetary discs in a double star. The new result also helps to explain why so many exoplanets — unlike the planets in the Solar System — came to have strange, eccentric or inclined orbits. The r...
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Unlike planes today, giant pterosaurs did not need runways. They were experts at vertical takeoff, a feat that is impossible or incredibly inefficient for today's aircraft. Because the reptiles had stiff but lightweight, hollow bones, they could use all four limbs—both their feet and wings—to push powerfully against the ground.
Even the U.S. Department of Defense has shown interest in these long-extinct reptiles
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Mike Simonsen

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My publications record
Query Results from the ADS Database Go to bottom of page Selected and retrieved  59  abstracts.    Sort options   Sort by date   Sort by citations   Sort by normalized citations   Sort by author   Sort by author count   Sort by page (ToC sort)  Bibcode ...
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The Planck satellite was launched in May 2009. With the highest accuracy to date, it measures the remnants of the radiation that filled the Universe immediately after the Big Bang. It is the oldest light in the Universe, emitted when...
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About two-thirds of all stars within 81 light years (25 parsecs) of Earth are binary or part of multi-star systems. Younger star and protostar populations have a higher frequency of multi-star systems than older ones, an observation that ties in with Boss’ findings that many single-star systems start out as binary or multi-star systems from which stars are ejected to achieve stability.
New research from the Carnegie Institution for Science helps to explain why binary stars are so abundant. Washington, D.C. — New modeling studies from Carnegie’s Alan Boss demonstrate that most of the stars we see were formed when unstable clusters of newly formed protostars broke up. The
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I know someone who has fully restored an 8-inch Dynamax telescope with some AAVSO historical significance, it was owned by George Van Biesbroeck, who would like to sell this to someone who will appreciate the unique value it has because of its connection to this famous astronomer (and AAVSO Council member).  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Van_Biesbroeck
If you are interested, contact me and I'll put you in touch with the seller.
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I had one of those! Awesome to know. 
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The first class in the CHOICE fall schedule is now open for registration!
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We've been cutting watermelon wrong all these years!
See the new, brilliant ideas for serving the summer favorite
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People
In his circles
129 people
Have him in circles
1,577 people
‫منير مقدح‬‎'s profile photo
Stefano Padovan's profile photo
EmmyPhilip Wise's profile photo
Jack Cassidy's profile photo
High Performance Conditioning's profile photo
Kevin Gonzales (Killy83)'s profile photo
Garsius Tyla's profile photo
Stefan Lamoureux's profile photo
Allen Austin's profile photo
Work
Occupation
AAVSO Membership Director
Employment
  • American Association of Variable Star Observers
    AAVSO Membership Director, present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Michigan
Previously
Michigan - Hawaii - Michigan - Texas - Iowa - Califronia - Ohio
Story
Tagline
astronomer, musician, writer, master gardener, enthusiastic cook, husband, father, cat lover, madman
Introduction


Mike Simonsen

American Association of Variable Star Observers

Mike is one of the world’s leading variable star observers and advocates. Since 1998 he has submitted over 89,000 variable star observations to the AAVSO International Database.

Mike is currently employed by the AAVSO as Membership Director and Development Officer. Among the many hats Mike wears, he is in charge of membership services and fundraising, and coordinates the AAVSO's online education institute, CHOICE.

His current area of research is the Z Cam sub-type of dwarf novae. Mike is the author or co-author of more than twenty peer-reviewed papers on cataclysmic variables.

In 2005, Simonsen received the AAVSO’s highest honor, the AAVSO Director's Award. In October 2011, Mike became only the third recipient of the Charles Butterworth Award, the British Astronomical Association Variable Star Section’s highest honor. In July, 2012 Mike received the Leslie Peltier Award from the Astronomical League. In 2015 Mike was awarded the Chambliss Amateur Achievement Award by the American Astronomical Society for his work on Z Cam dwarf novae.

Main belt asteroid 367732 is named Mikesimonsen in his honor.

An animated and enthusiastic speaker, Mike gives talks on stellar astronomy and variable star science to astronomy clubs, star parties, planetariums, conferences and university groups throughout the United States each year.

Mike's observatory, named after legendary AAVSO observer and chart maker, Charles E. Scovil, houses two 12" LX200 telescopes, one for visual use and one for CCD observations, or as Mike likes to joke, "One for each eye!" He is now amassing both visual and CCD observations from home and remote robotic telescopes.
Bragging rights
I have observed at the eyepiece of the three largest refracting telescopes in the world.
Education
  • Michigan State University
    Horticulture
  • Wayne State University
    Music Education
  • Mott High School
    Math, Science, English, Music
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Simostronomy
The people who work here are mostly rude and in need of customer relations training. The old lady is the worst. What a grump.
Public - a week ago
reviewed a week ago
I tried to call my mother on Saturday morning and no one would answer the phone. Finally someone answered and they put me on hold and left me there for over ten minutes. I finally hung up, drove down there and pulled my mom out of that dump. No stars. Three cockroaches.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
A Mexican restaurant is only as good as its salsa. There's salsa is almost as good as their food. If you can find a better Mexican restaurant in Big Bear Lake California I'll eat your burrito.
Food: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Very Good
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
6 reviews
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My waitress was very attentive in spite of being quite busy, and I ran her butt off. I left her a generous tip which she very much deserved. The Texas Pesos appetizer was something I had never had before. I loved them, but was glad they come with Ranch dressing to cool them down a bit. They do have a bite. The broccoli and cheese with jalapeno soup was simply awesome. I could have just had a big bowl of that for dinner and gone away happy. The mashed potatoes with my steak were so good they didn't need gravy, butter, salt or anything. This place is on my 'must do list' next time I'm in Ft. Worth.
• • •
Food: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
I wish every contractor I've dealt with was a professional and efficient as these guys. Holland H&C installed a furnace and AC unit for us in 2005, and the two man crew who came to our house were simply amazing. I recommend you just call these guys to do your work and don't even bother checking anyone else. BTW, our Trane furnace and AC are the best improvement we've ever made to a home and neither has ever given us a lick of trouble in 8 years.
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago