Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Dean Shareski
6,380 followers -
Learning stuff since 1964
Learning stuff since 1964

6,380 followers
About
Dean Shareski's posts

Post has attachment
Dean Shareski commented on a post on Blogger.
Hey Chris,

Facebook is problematic for many reasons. But the tragedy of the commons comes to mind. For so many reasons, lack of diversity, manipulated algorithms, fake news sources, trolls to name a few, Facebook will never be a place to bring people together on controversial topics. At best it brings like minded folks together. Which is fine for some things. But we've fooled ourselves or perhaps have just become lazy in believing anything of value will come from conversations in those spaces. I'm not sure any online space is good for that. For now, I'm going to continue to seek out alternative views but given the messy and ignorance that is pervasive, I'll do my best to find smart people from all walks of life to learn from and have meaningful dialog with. Seems like these people are really hard to find.

Post has attachment
Dean Shareski commented on a post on Blogger.
"Should I become a teacher?" Always a tough question to answer. I echo much of what you say here and wrote more here. http://ideasandthoughts.org/2015/04/21/2984/ While I value the work of educators, I know many currently in our profession, really shouldn't be doing the job. Not because they're bad people or have questionable motives but because, as you suggest, the job is getting harder and what I suggest, very different. The shift from purely a context expert to a learner expert requires a different skill set. I worry too often this becomes a polarizing discussion that suggests those who leave or don't choose education are somehow lesser. I don't believe this. Just as not choosing to be a doctor doesn't mean you don't want to care for people, but you may not be cut out for it. 

I just want to insure that the language we use isn't meant to alienate those who choose not to or should not be in education. 

Post has attachment
Dean Shareski commented on a post on Blogger.
Congratulations. It's nice when people who do great work get new opportunities. 

Post has attachment
Dean Shareski commented on a post on Blogger.
As much as I have talked about joy in the past number of years, it's important to emphasize that happiness isn't the goal. Purpose and meaning is what we should offer students. The result is joy. That said, joy becomes the manifestation and often the visible expression that builds culture and community. 

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Dean Shareski commented on a post on Blogger.
Part of the issue here comes in how we define failure and the specifics of the event. Failing at a video game or failing at a marriage are obviously vastly different in terms of impact and significance and complexity. I think our own personal experiences and notions of what failure means can cloud this conversation. 
One thing I do think is universal about failure is the role of reflection and self examination. To me, that's our role as adults, to help students and children be reflective when they aren't successful. Whether it's a video game, a science test or a marriage, you'll never overcome defeat unless you take time and thought to determine what went wrong and what you might need to do to get better. At that point it's not about celebrating failure or shaming people into seeing that they've failed but about accepting responsibility and either devising a plan to improve or seeking support from others. I think we all get frustrated when that doesn't happen with our kids. By celebrating it I fear we might be sending the wrong message, that somehow it doesn't matter when it might. At the same time there may be occasions when someone needs encouragement to keep going. I don't know if that means celebrating it but it might mean helping them put it in a different context. 

While not exactly the same, I wrote about winning and losing a few months back. 
http://ideasandthoughts.org/2014/07/24/winning-isnt-that-great-and-losing-isnt-that-bad/

Post has attachment
And this is essentially why I don't like the phrase "student achievement" https://www.flickr.com/photos/grade6kms/8853870553/in/faves-shareski/

Post has attachment
Dean Shareski commented on a post on Blogger.
I'd suggest this is the reality for most leaders who care. I continually see teachers across the continent who feel the same way. As you already know, it's not the result of one thing but the continued bombardment of expectations from many sources.

Not that you'll solve all this but the only advice I'd offer is to sort out your own feelings of being overwhelmed. If you feel it, they feel it. I don't know exactly what you need to do to change this but that's where to start. I talk a lot about being busy and the way it corrupts.

I read a quote the other day that I think has helped me. "If your goal is to live a remarkable life, then busyness and exhaustion are the enemy." 

Post has attachment
Added photos to EdTechTeam Singapore Summit featuring Google for Education.

Post has attachment
Dean Shareski commented on a post on Blogger.
For me it began in 2005 when I decided to try this thing called "blogging". I was actively trying to get teachers to develop websites but had little uptake since it was fairly cumbersome to maintain. 

I hadn't really thought much about the commenting aspect but was elated, surprised and intrigued after I received my first comment from a teacher from Texas. It essentially awakened me to the possibility of learning with people across the globe. I was able to have conversations both on my blog and on others that interested me and it quickly became a place of learning and has remained the most important element of my professional learning life. 
Wait while more posts are being loaded