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Beth Winegarner
1,020 followers -
Journalist and author
Journalist and author

1,020 followers
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And please share this widely. 

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Women have been facing similar threats from online trolls — most of whom are men and teenage boys — for years. Such behaviors are at the root of Gamergate and other efforts to make women feel unwelcome and unsafe on social media, in online gaming and other contexts. And, just like the threats against Clinton, law enforcement has done essentially nothing to actually enforce the laws that make death threats illegal.

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"I know that I can do whatever I want to do — it’s not just yoga. The tendency to say, “I can’t do something,” it’s not just athletics. They probably also say. “I can’t do blank because of blank.”

"But when you try [athletics] and it’s fun and awesome and you can do it, it suggests you can do those other things too. You can’t be the prey of people who want to oppress."

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"I know we can do better for our girls. In fact, we must, because this sort of messaging that we see in the media (and in the toy aisles) — that’s there’s only one right way for a girl to be — has real and negative consequences."

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Goth may have gone underground after Columbine, but it didn’t shrivel up and die. Far from it: Listen, and you’ll hear it in all sorts of bands. Newer generations of musicians who fell in love with goth’s spooky, ethereal, reverb-soaked vibe and its willingness to embrace humanity’s shadow side brought those elements into fresh musical contexts. While more than a few—including In Solitude, Grave Pleasures, and She Wants Revenge—have brought classic goth and goth rock wholesale into the present day, others are grafting goth onto black metal, drone, folk, and witchy pop to create new blossoming branches on the dark-music family tree.

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The suddenness of Pokémon Go’s mass popularity signals that a technological revolution is upon us, and it is past time for an industry-wide set of ethical standards for augmented reality.

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The politics of the matter aside, I think this would be excellent for the country for a number of reasons.

First, Obama has always been known for a profoundly thoughtful and deliberative style. This is unusual among Presidents (of any party), but is ideal for Supreme Court justices.

Second, he has a profound familiarity with the law, not just from a theoretical perspective (teaching Constitutional Law at Chicago for 12 years) but more importantly in its day-to-day practice.

Third, and perhaps most importantly, the Court desperately needs some non-judicial blood on it. Justice O'Connor, who was on the bench from 1981 to 2006, was the last justice to not have come directly from being a sitting federal judge. (She was a state judge, and before that a state senator and an assistant AG) Having a homogenous bench can create a profound myopia; people who have seen the law from a wide variety of angles will approach questions from more angles, and broad thinking makes good case law.

A former president would bring a truly extraordinary background to the job, especially when so many cases involving issues of national security, the executive branch, or the balance of powers are at stake. Far from making him biased, I suspect this would bring tremendous nuance to the conversation, with deliberations now having a profound awareness of the consequences of each decision.

The last time we had a former president on the Court was when President Taft became Chief Justice in 1921. His nine years on the bench are still remembered for the way in which he restructured the federal judiciary, making it more organized and efficient (and finally getting the Supreme Court its own building); he is still remembered as one of the greatest Chief Justices, and his bust stands in the hall of the Court. Obama, I suspect, would outdo this legacy.

There are obvious political obstacles to such a nomination, but in a day where every conceivable nomination has infinite political obstacles, this starts to fall into the category of "why not?" I certainly couldn't think of anyone more qualified for the job. (And I know some pretty exceptional jurists)

h/t +Shava Nerad.

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Quartz asked me to write a commentary piece on why Ingress is ultimately the more satisfying augmented reality game:
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