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EMPATHY SKIN AND LASER CLINIC DELHI
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Driving with passengers for the first time is a big responsibility and can be a nerve wracking prospect for a new driver. With lots of new distractions to complicate your driving experience, it’s worth considering the practical aspects of driving with passengers in advance of your journey.

Know your responsibilities
If you are driving with children under 14 years of age, you are legally responsible for ensuring they are wearing a seatbelt. By law, all children under 12 years of age, or 135cm in height, must be secured with the correct car seat for their weight . Children and adults over 14 years of age are legally responsible for wearing their own seatbelts, however as the driver it is important to enforce this as a rule for the safety of everyone in the vehicle. 


 Drivers and passengers who fail to wear seatbelts, whether in the front or back of a vehicle, are breaking the law and could face prosecution . Needless to say, not wearing a seatbelt in a moving vehicle is also exceptionally dangerous. If involved in a crash, you are twice as likely to die if you aren’t wearing a seatbelt . Encouraging unwilling passengers to belt-up may be a difficult conversation to have, but in a collision, even one passenger without a seatbelt could endanger everyone in the vehicle. It’s thought that an un-belted back seat passenger kills between eight and fifteen front seat passengers in UK collisions each year .

Prepare for a different driving experience
Driving with passengers throws a few more variables into the driving experience. If you have passengers in the back seat of your car, you will be able to see them in the rear view mirror. Don’t let this put you off, continue to check your mirrors as usual to maintain safe observation of the road while you drive. 

Having passengers in your car will also increase the weight of the vehicle and is likely to impact stopping distances, so be prepared to adjust stopping distances accordingly, allowing plenty of time to brake.

Passengers can be distracting, if you aren’t used to chatter while you drive, discuss this before you set out on your journey. If you feel your passengers are distracting you, speak up and ask them to stop, remember that as the driver your concentration is essential to safety and should be your first priority. Only listen to music while driving if this is something you’re comfortable with, if you aren’t used to listening to music while driving explain this to your passengers at the start of your trip. Make sure that music is kept at a sensible volume so that you don’t feel distracted and can still hear the traffic around you. If you find yourself in a stressful driving situation, ask the front seat passenger to turn the music off immediately.

Never put up with irresponsible behaviour from passengers, if you need to, pull over in a safe location and speak to them about the conditions you require to drive safely.

Taking and making calls
It is illegal to use a hand held mobile phone for any purpose while driving in the UK. If you’re caught using a hand held mobile while driving you are likely to receive three penalty points on your licence and a fine of £60, if your case goes to court you could face a maximum fine of £1000 and a disqualification from driving . 

Even with a hands-free system, using a mobile phone while driving is a distraction and is therefore potentially dangerous. If you do need to phone someone while driving, best practice is always to find a safe place to pull over so you can make the call while your vehicle is stationary. If your phone rings while you are driving, let the call go to voice mail and check your messages when you stop for a break.

Look after yourself
If you are taking friends on a long drive, remember to schedule regular breaks, if you’re tired, don’t feel you need to keep going because you are the driver. It’s usually a good idea to plan rest breaks at comfortable intervals as part of your route. If you are delayed by heavy traffic, add extra rest stops to your journey. 

Make sure you eat as usual throughout the day and drink plenty of water to stay hydrated, particularly if the weather is hot. To help with alertness while driving, keep your vehicle well ventilated, opening windows to allow air to circulate. If you find yourself getting tired but can’t pull over safely to rest, ask your passengers to keep you alert by speaking to you and to locate the next available rest stop on a map.

Although it’s natural to estimate your time of arrival on a long journey, remember that unforeseen circumstances may affect this. Never rush or skip rest breaks to make up for lost time; remember that as the driver, your well being and alertness are essential for safe driving. If you are travelling behind schedule, ask one of your passengers to phone ahead to your destination to inform them of your delay.
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Go to the Dentist
Oh, you don't love spending time and money as a stranger picks, buffs, scrapes, fills or pulls your teeth? Join the club. No one says you ought to enjoy dental appointments, but that doesn't mean you should skip them. It's through the mouth that we breathe, eat, communicate and kiss, so it's usually worth 45 minutes of discomfort to keep your mouth healthy. If you're not convinced, we've debunked three popular excuses for skipping appointments. 

Dental work is too expensive. Many of us have dropped a swollen, drool-soaked jaw upon leaving a dental appointment and hearing the cost of the procedure. In fact, more than one in three Americans delays dental care because of their financial situation, according to a 2013 survey by ORC International and Aspen Dental, which also shows that 61 percent of workers making less than $35,000 per year don't have dental insurance. A study from Harris Interactive and the American Dental Association elaborates on the dental divide: There are those who can afford dental care, go to the dentist and have good oral health, and then there are those who can't afford dental care, avoid the dentist and thus land with poor oral health, which is quite expensive to treat. 

Yes, shelling out for fillings and cleanings can be frustrating and flat-out difficult to afford if you're broke. But putting off these necessary appointments can cost much more in the long run. Nathan Laughrey, owner of several Aspen Dental practices in western Pennsylvania, sees many patients with decay, broken teeth and lost fillings. "If they came in right away or had routine maintenance, we could have covered them with crowns and replaced fillings – a couple hundred dollars worth of work," he says. "But it turns into thousands of dollars worth of extractions and root canals." 

Laughrey also has patients who have had gum disease for years but didn't recognize the warning signs – persistent bad breath and receding gums that may be red, swollen and tender, among others. So by the time they pay him a visit, he often needs to pull all their teeth. Indeed, the ADA survey shows that adults making less than $30,000 per year are more than twice as likely than those earning $30,000 or more to have had all their teeth removed.

Tooth decay and gum disease are slow, progressive problems; you don't wake up one morning and suddenly need all your teeth pulled. At regular appointments, professionals can detect warning signs, help you prevent the diseases if you're at risk and catch them in their early stages – before they do major damage to your mouth and wallet. "They're easily prevented and controlled diseases," says William Kohn, vice president of dental science and policy at Delta Dental Plans Association, and a former director of the Division of Oral Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "But once they start, they're hard to reverse. Prevention is key to dental success." 

The most obvious way to save money on dentistry, Kohn says, is to regularly spend a few bucks at the drugstore on fluoride toothpaste and floss, use the products regularly and get checkups twice a year to avoid costly dental ailments from the get-go. But if the classic "brush and floss" bit is too little too late, and you need to foot an intense bill for dental work, ask your health care provider for financing options, which may allow you to stretch payments across several months, Laughrey suggests. He also says, acknowledging that this advice could be filed under "easier said than done," to try budgeting money specifically for dentistry, just as you would for primary care checkups. 

Dental appointments are uncomfortable. Well, yeah. Health care is personal, and lying back with machinery in your mouth can make you feel vulnerable. But it is what it is, and dentistry has improved vastly in the last couple decades. "A lot of people base their fears on what they had when they were kids," Laughrey says, "but modern dentistry is a whole lot different than it was in 1960." Think about what specific part of dental appointments makes you cringe, and communicate that fear to your dentist, Laughrey says. If it's the sound of the drill that curdles your blood, the dentist may suggest you bring in an iPod. If it's a needle you fear, the dentist may try an oral sedative or topical anesthetic. "We get lumped into this big pile, like we're sadists and enjoy inflicting pain, but it's much easier to work on a patient who is calm," Laughrey says. "And if you have a dentist that doesn't cater to your whims, find another one." Even with a mouthful of cotton balls and drills, you have a voice with your dentist, so use it. Talk about fears and possible adjustments to curb them. Ask questions. "You shouldn't be afraid to ask questions, and you should really expect to receive good answers," Kohn says. And if the questions go unanswered? Or you feel unwarranted judgement as opposed to information and advice? Switch dentists. 

I earn gold stars for my dental hygiene, and I'm in no oral pain. Kudos! Taking care of your teeth is the best way to ward off oral diseases and ailments. But often, the symptoms from the diseases won't be obvious until they've progressed considerably. Cue the medical expert checking for signs and risk factors. Plus, Laughrey says, a professional cleaning is usually leagues more thorough than the brushing you do at home. If you really feel like an oral health superstar – the kind with a toothbrush at the office and a special pride for being cavity-free – then simply ask the dentist if it makes more sense to come in once a year instead of twice. 

And why wait until you feel pain to see the doctor? "If you have pain, it's usually too late," Laughrey says. "The definition of preventative care is to find pain ahead of time, and handle it when it's small."
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