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Jo Passed combine jangly #indierock and #indiepop on the groovy new song 'Spring'
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Jo Passed - Out EP - 05 - Jo Passed - Spring by jopassed
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REVIEW: PJ Harvey - The Hope Six Demolition Project
Back on the scene with her ninth studio album, English singer-songwriter PJ Harvey gives us “The Hope Six Demolition Project,” a high-energy, guitar-heavy, fresh mix of songs that takes on such meaty topics as war and global poverty.

Inspired by recent travels to Afghanistan and Washington D.C., PJ Harvey doesn’t hold back on tracks like “The Community of Hope,” in which she describes a certain housing project as a  “well-known pathway of death” against a catchy cowbell, and in “Orange Monkey,” where upon “[taking] a plane to a foreign land” she observes mountains as  “plates tipped up upon themselves / the pain of fifty million years.”

It is hard to know what to expect with each PJ Harvey album, and this is certainly a good thing. Impassioned with the learning process that comes with making music, Harvey refuses to repeat anything she has ever done in any of her past albums. Her impressive contralto vocal range gives her the artistic freedom to experiment with eclectic sounds, and she uses this to her advantage on this album.

Playing against repetitive, guitar-driven rhythms in songs like “The Ministry of Defense,” “A Line in the Sand,” and “The Ministry of Social Affairs” Harvey’s voice serves as a melodic -- sometimes, even angelic -- counter-argument to the otherwise rebellious musical atmosphere inherent throughout the album. In this way, her voice as an instrument may serve to symbolize the good in the world we all hope for, while the more hectic parts of each song remind us of all there is in the world from which we must still shield ourselves -- or perhaps fight against.

With this album, PJ Harvey convinces us of the latter. We may be stronger than we think -- but in “The Hope Six Demolition Project,” she also reminds us that there is still so much strength in being present in the midst of it all -- in simply being vulnerable in this often destructive, chaotic world.

Read the review & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2016/04-April/016-PJ-Harvey-The-Hope-Six-Demolition-Project-Review.html
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REVIEW: PJ Harvey - The Hope Six Demolition Project
Back on the scene with her ninth studio album, English singer-songwriter PJ Harvey gives us “The Hope Six Demolition Project,” a high-energy, guitar-heavy, fresh mix of songs that takes on such meaty topics as war and global poverty.

Inspired by recent travels to Afghanistan and Washington D.C., PJ Harvey doesn’t hold back on tracks like “The Community of Hope,” in which she describes a certain housing project as a  “well-known pathway of death” against a catchy cowbell, and in “Orange Monkey,” where upon “[taking] a plane to a foreign land” she observes mountains as  “plates tipped up upon themselves / the pain of fifty million years.”

It is hard to know what to expect with each PJ Harvey album, and this is certainly a good thing. Impassioned with the learning process that comes with making music, Harvey refuses to repeat anything she has ever done in any of her past albums. Her impressive contralto vocal range gives her the artistic freedom to experiment with eclectic sounds, and she uses this to her advantage on this album.

Playing against repetitive, guitar-driven rhythms in songs like “The Ministry of Defense,” “A Line in the Sand,” and “The Ministry of Social Affairs” Harvey’s voice serves as a melodic -- sometimes, even angelic -- counter-argument to the otherwise rebellious musical atmosphere inherent throughout the album. In this way, her voice as an instrument may serve to symbolize the good in the world we all hope for, while the more hectic parts of each song remind us of all there is in the world from which we must still shield ourselves -- or perhaps fight against.

With this album, PJ Harvey convinces us of the latter. We may be stronger than we think -- but in “The Hope Six Demolition Project,” she also reminds us that there is still so much strength in being present in the midst of it all -- in simply being vulnerable in this often destructive, chaotic world.

Read the review & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2016/04-April/016-PJ-Harvey-The-Hope-Six-Demolition-Project-Review.html
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Ultra Music Festival 2017 Ticket Registration Is Open!
Ultra Music Festival 2017 is a tropical hook up of electronic musicians and minds, gathered together for 3 days of music, experimentation, and partying. Swimming pools, worldwide DJ's, and party people gather in Miami for Spring's ultimate music festival. This is the first phase of getting low priced tickets for next year's show!

Find out more at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/spaceLAB/theSHOW/MusicFestivals/Ultra-Music-Festival-2017-Lineup-Tickets-Dates-Live-Stream-Miami-Rumors-After-Parties.html

#ultramusicfestival #ultramusicfestival2017 #ultramiami #ultra2017 #umf #ultra #miami #florida #trancefamily #trance #trancemusic #trancehead #music #electronicmusic #dancemusic #dj #techno #dubstep #electro #edm #edmgirls #edmfamily #edmlife #electronica #electrohouse #progressivehouse #housemusic #festival #musicfestival #musicfestivals #usa
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REVIEW: Dandy Warhols - Distortland
Here it is: album number 10 from the Dandys. Almost two decades after they tripped their way out of Portland with the dancing-heroine-needle-David-LaChappelle-directed classic “Not if You Were the Last Junky on Earth” and the semi-staged feud between them and the Brian Jonestown Massacre, featured on the documentary Dig—they’re still running strong.  

Their latest offering Distortland doesn’t have the drive power-pop feel of ...The Dandy Warhols Come Down or the sass of the synth-fueled Welcome to the Monkey House, but the Dandys don’t seem interested in recreating those moments.  Without losing their signature sound, they’ve ventured even further away from their flirtation with pop and deeper into a trippy world of expansive and hypnotic atmospheres.

It all begins with “Search Party” and the all-too-familiar Dandy’s bounce on the distorted keyboard bass.  However, “Semper Fidelis” quickly changes it up with an unusually metalesque guitar and an almost gothy vibe.  Changing directions again, “Pope Reverend Jim” pushes towards the bouncy and erratic feel of Sparks.  However it’s “Catcher In The Rye” that harkens back to more classic Dandy Warhols with singer Courtney Taylor-Taylor’s signature deep vocals riding atop a rubberband bassline.  

“STYGGO” drops a disco beat, bouncy guitar and bass and slathers some do do doos on top of it all.  This proves to be one of the catchiest songs on the record.  “You Are Killing Me” locks into the same groove and adds some sweet guitar chugging to boot.

Bringing the glorious gloom,  “Give” brushes away the blue skies away while “Doves” paints the soundscape of a vast ocean or cloud-streaked sky.

“All The Girls In London” shows that the Dandys are still in touch with the 70s glam while “The Grow Up Song” ends the record just like just like Welcome to the Monkey House began: crunchy guitars and snotty lyrics.

After more than two decades recording together, of course the Dandys are going to be different.  Distortland shows that the band still has an edge and isn’t afraid to put out a record that’s on their terms.

Read the review & listen to the full album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2016/04-April/015-Dandy-Warhols-Distortland-Review.html
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REVIEW: PJ Harvey - The Hope Six Demolition Project
Back on the scene with her ninth studio album, English singer-songwriter PJ Harvey gives us “The Hope Six Demolition Project,” a high-energy, guitar-heavy, fresh mix of songs that takes on such meaty topics as war and global poverty.

Inspired by recent travels to Afghanistan and Washington D.C., PJ Harvey doesn’t hold back on tracks like “The Community of Hope,” in which she describes a certain housing project as a  “well-known pathway of death” against a catchy cowbell, and in “Orange Monkey,” where upon “[taking] a plane to a foreign land” she observes mountains as  “plates tipped up upon themselves / the pain of fifty million years.”

It is hard to know what to expect with each PJ Harvey album, and this is certainly a good thing. Impassioned with the learning process that comes with making music, Harvey refuses to repeat anything she has ever done in any of her past albums. Her impressive contralto vocal range gives her the artistic freedom to experiment with eclectic sounds, and she uses this to her advantage on this album.

Playing against repetitive, guitar-driven rhythms in songs like “The Ministry of Defense,” “A Line in the Sand,” and “The Ministry of Social Affairs” Harvey’s voice serves as a melodic -- sometimes, even angelic -- counter-argument to the otherwise rebellious musical atmosphere inherent throughout the album. In this way, her voice as an instrument may serve to symbolize the good in the world we all hope for, while the more hectic parts of each song remind us of all there is in the world from which we must still shield ourselves -- or perhaps fight against.

With this album, PJ Harvey convinces us of the latter. We may be stronger than we think -- but in “The Hope Six Demolition Project,” she also reminds us that there is still so much strength in being present in the midst of it all -- in simply being vulnerable in this often destructive, chaotic world.

Read the review & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2016/04-April/016-PJ-Harvey-The-Hope-Six-Demolition-Project-Review.html
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REVIEW: PJ Harvey - The Hope Six Demolition Project
Back on the scene with her ninth studio album, English singer-songwriter PJ Harvey gives us “The Hope Six Demolition Project,” a high-energy, guitar-heavy, fresh mix of songs that takes on such meaty topics as war and global poverty.

Inspired by recent travels to Afghanistan and Washington D.C., PJ Harvey doesn’t hold back on tracks like “The Community of Hope,” in which she describes a certain housing project as a  “well-known pathway of death” against a catchy cowbell, and in “Orange Monkey,” where upon “[taking] a plane to a foreign land” she observes mountains as  “plates tipped up upon themselves / the pain of fifty million years.”

It is hard to know what to expect with each PJ Harvey album, and this is certainly a good thing. Impassioned with the learning process that comes with making music, Harvey refuses to repeat anything she has ever done in any of her past albums. Her impressive contralto vocal range gives her the artistic freedom to experiment with eclectic sounds, and she uses this to her advantage on this album.

Playing against repetitive, guitar-driven rhythms in songs like “The Ministry of Defense,” “A Line in the Sand,” and “The Ministry of Social Affairs” Harvey’s voice serves as a melodic -- sometimes, even angelic -- counter-argument to the otherwise rebellious musical atmosphere inherent throughout the album. In this way, her voice as an instrument may serve to symbolize the good in the world we all hope for, while the more hectic parts of each song remind us of all there is in the world from which we must still shield ourselves -- or perhaps fight against.

With this album, PJ Harvey convinces us of the latter. We may be stronger than we think -- but in “The Hope Six Demolition Project,” she also reminds us that there is still so much strength in being present in the midst of it all -- in simply being vulnerable in this often destructive, chaotic world.

Read the review & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2016/04-April/016-PJ-Harvey-The-Hope-Six-Demolition-Project-Review.html
1
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REVIEW: PJ Harvey - The Hope Six Demolition Project
Back on the scene with her ninth studio album, English singer-songwriter PJ Harvey gives us “The Hope Six Demolition Project,” a high-energy, guitar-heavy, fresh mix of songs that takes on such meaty topics as war and global poverty.

Inspired by recent travels to Afghanistan and Washington D.C., PJ Harvey doesn’t hold back on tracks like “The Community of Hope,” in which she describes a certain housing project as a  “well-known pathway of death” against a catchy cowbell, and in “Orange Monkey,” where upon “[taking] a plane to a foreign land” she observes mountains as  “plates tipped up upon themselves / the pain of fifty million years.”

It is hard to know what to expect with each PJ Harvey album, and this is certainly a good thing. Impassioned with the learning process that comes with making music, Harvey refuses to repeat anything she has ever done in any of her past albums. Her impressive contralto vocal range gives her the artistic freedom to experiment with eclectic sounds, and she uses this to her advantage on this album.

Playing against repetitive, guitar-driven rhythms in songs like “The Ministry of Defense,” “A Line in the Sand,” and “The Ministry of Social Affairs” Harvey’s voice serves as a melodic -- sometimes, even angelic -- counter-argument to the otherwise rebellious musical atmosphere inherent throughout the album. In this way, her voice as an instrument may serve to symbolize the good in the world we all hope for, while the more hectic parts of each song remind us of all there is in the world from which we must still shield ourselves -- or perhaps fight against.

With this album, PJ Harvey convinces us of the latter. We may be stronger than we think -- but in “The Hope Six Demolition Project,” she also reminds us that there is still so much strength in being present in the midst of it all -- in simply being vulnerable in this often destructive, chaotic world.

Read the review & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2016/04-April/016-PJ-Harvey-The-Hope-Six-Demolition-Project-Review.html
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REVIEW: Dandy Warhols - Distortland
Here it is: album number 10 from the Dandys. Almost two decades after they tripped their way out of Portland with the dancing-heroine-needle-David-LaChappelle-directed classic “Not if You Were the Last Junky on Earth” and the semi-staged feud between them and the Brian Jonestown Massacre, featured on the documentary Dig—they’re still running strong.  

Their latest offering Distortland doesn’t have the drive power-pop feel of ...The Dandy Warhols Come Down or the sass of the synth-fueled Welcome to the Monkey House, but the Dandys don’t seem interested in recreating those moments.  Without losing their signature sound, they’ve ventured even further away from their flirtation with pop and deeper into a trippy world of expansive and hypnotic atmospheres.

It all begins with “Search Party” and the all-too-familiar Dandy’s bounce on the distorted keyboard bass.  However, “Semper Fidelis” quickly changes it up with an unusually metalesque guitar and an almost gothy vibe.  Changing directions again, “Pope Reverend Jim” pushes towards the bouncy and erratic feel of Sparks.  However it’s “Catcher In The Rye” that harkens back to more classic Dandy Warhols with singer Courtney Taylor-Taylor’s signature deep vocals riding atop a rubberband bassline.  

“STYGGO” drops a disco beat, bouncy guitar and bass and slathers some do do doos on top of it all.  This proves to be one of the catchiest songs on the record.  “You Are Killing Me” locks into the same groove and adds some sweet guitar chugging to boot.

Bringing the glorious gloom,  “Give” brushes away the blue skies away while “Doves” paints the soundscape of a vast ocean or cloud-streaked sky.

“All The Girls In London” shows that the Dandys are still in touch with the 70s glam while “The Grow Up Song” ends the record just like just like Welcome to the Monkey House began: crunchy guitars and snotty lyrics.

After more than two decades recording together, of course the Dandys are going to be different.  Distortland shows that the band still has an edge and isn’t afraid to put out a record that’s on their terms.

Read the review & listen to the full album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2016/04-April/015-Dandy-Warhols-Distortland-Review.html
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REVIEW: Dandy Warhols - Distortland
Here it is: album number 10 from the Dandys. Almost two decades after they tripped their way out of Portland with the dancing-heroine-needle-David-LaChappelle-directed classic “Not if You Were the Last Junky on Earth” and the semi-staged feud between them and the Brian Jonestown Massacre, featured on the documentary Dig—they’re still running strong.  

Their latest offering Distortland doesn’t have the drive power-pop feel of ...The Dandy Warhols Come Down or the sass of the synth-fueled Welcome to the Monkey House, but the Dandys don’t seem interested in recreating those moments.  Without losing their signature sound, they’ve ventured even further away from their flirtation with pop and deeper into a trippy world of expansive and hypnotic atmospheres.

It all begins with “Search Party” and the all-too-familiar Dandy’s bounce on the distorted keyboard bass.  However, “Semper Fidelis” quickly changes it up with an unusually metalesque guitar and an almost gothy vibe.  Changing directions again, “Pope Reverend Jim” pushes towards the bouncy and erratic feel of Sparks.  However it’s “Catcher In The Rye” that harkens back to more classic Dandy Warhols with singer Courtney Taylor-Taylor’s signature deep vocals riding atop a rubberband bassline.  

“STYGGO” drops a disco beat, bouncy guitar and bass and slathers some do do doos on top of it all.  This proves to be one of the catchiest songs on the record.  “You Are Killing Me” locks into the same groove and adds some sweet guitar chugging to boot.

Bringing the glorious gloom,  “Give” brushes away the blue skies away while “Doves” paints the soundscape of a vast ocean or cloud-streaked sky.

“All The Girls In London” shows that the Dandys are still in touch with the 70s glam while “The Grow Up Song” ends the record just like just like Welcome to the Monkey House began: crunchy guitars and snotty lyrics.

After more than two decades recording together, of course the Dandys are going to be different.  Distortland shows that the band still has an edge and isn’t afraid to put out a record that’s on their terms.

Read the review & listen to the full album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2016/04-April/015-Dandy-Warhols-Distortland-Review.html
1
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REVIEW: Dandy Warhols - Distortland
Here it is: album number 10 from the Dandys. Almost two decades after they tripped their way out of Portland with the dancing-heroine-needle-David-LaChappelle-directed classic “Not if You Were the Last Junky on Earth” and the semi-staged feud between them and the Brian Jonestown Massacre, featured on the documentary Dig—they’re still running strong.  

Their latest offering Distortland doesn’t have the drive power-pop feel of ...The Dandy Warhols Come Down or the sass of the synth-fueled Welcome to the Monkey House, but the Dandys don’t seem interested in recreating those moments.  Without losing their signature sound, they’ve ventured even further away from their flirtation with pop and deeper into a trippy world of expansive and hypnotic atmospheres.

It all begins with “Search Party” and the all-too-familiar Dandy’s bounce on the distorted keyboard bass.  However, “Semper Fidelis” quickly changes it up with an unusually metalesque guitar and an almost gothy vibe.  Changing directions again, “Pope Reverend Jim” pushes towards the bouncy and erratic feel of Sparks.  However it’s “Catcher In The Rye” that harkens back to more classic Dandy Warhols with singer Courtney Taylor-Taylor’s signature deep vocals riding atop a rubberband bassline.  

“STYGGO” drops a disco beat, bouncy guitar and bass and slathers some do do doos on top of it all.  This proves to be one of the catchiest songs on the record.  “You Are Killing Me” locks into the same groove and adds some sweet guitar chugging to boot.

Bringing the glorious gloom,  “Give” brushes away the blue skies away while “Doves” paints the soundscape of a vast ocean or cloud-streaked sky.

“All The Girls In London” shows that the Dandys are still in touch with the 70s glam while “The Grow Up Song” ends the record just like just like Welcome to the Monkey House began: crunchy guitars and snotty lyrics.

After more than two decades recording together, of course the Dandys are going to be different.  Distortland shows that the band still has an edge and isn’t afraid to put out a record that’s on their terms.

Read the review & listen to the full album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2016/04-April/015-Dandy-Warhols-Distortland-Review.html
3
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Spacelab Magazine - Indie and Electronic Music's Collections
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Indie music news, music festivals, videos and streaming for music and film, streaming music sites and music technology.
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Spacelab is a collective, bringing you the best indie music news, music festivals and media from the independent music scene. This includes indie rock, electronic music, alternative music and more.
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