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REVIEW: of Montreal - Aureate Gloom
By: Daniel Ward
Time passes quickly: it’s hard to believe that of Montreal have been making albums for nearly twenty years and that their thirteenth album drops this month on Polyvinyl.  Wonderful as ever and just as expected - imagine a record that touches on everything from David Bowie, Prince, Black Sabbath and Sonic Youth and you’ll have Aureate Gloom.

Musically the record is all over the place, but of Montreal are masters and always make it work.  The album’s opener “Bassem Sabry” begins with a guitar riff that sounds like Toni Iommi’s lead-in to Black Sabbath’s “Iron Man”, and the song escalates into funk, complete with 70s style strings and wah-wah guitars.  

The lyrics are equally whimsical with lines like “I believe in witches, I believe in you.” The intro guitars on “Last Rites at the Jane Hotel” sound like something Mick Ronson would have played on Aladdin Sane, and falsetto vocals on the chorus call Prince to mind.  The shifting moods, tones and musical arrangements are always quirky, strange, glamorous and sexual at the same time.  

With so many bands that subscribe to a typical rock song format, of Montreal is always refreshing because their arrangements ebb and flow like a movie soundtrack or the movement of a symphony as opposed to verse chorus verse. Their creativity and uniqueness continue to rise above the ocean of ephemeral, cookie-cutter bands.

See more & listen to the full album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/003-Music-Review-of-Montreal-Aureate-Gloom.html
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REVIEW: of Montreal - Aureate Gloom
By: Daniel Ward
Time passes quickly: it’s hard to believe that of Montreal have been making albums for nearly twenty years and that their thirteenth album drops this month on Polyvinyl.  Wonderful as ever and just as expected - imagine a record that touches on everything from David Bowie, Prince, Black Sabbath and Sonic Youth and you’ll have Aureate Gloom.

Musically the record is all over the place, but of Montreal are masters and always make it work.  The album’s opener “Bassem Sabry” begins with a guitar riff that sounds like Toni Iommi’s lead-in to Black Sabbath’s “Iron Man”, and the song escalates into funk, complete with 70s style strings and wah-wah guitars.  

The lyrics are equally whimsical with lines like “I believe in witches, I believe in you.” The intro guitars on “Last Rites at the Jane Hotel” sound like something Mick Ronson would have played on Aladdin Sane, and falsetto vocals on the chorus call Prince to mind.  The shifting moods, tones and musical arrangements are always quirky, strange, glamorous and sexual at the same time.  

With so many bands that subscribe to a typical rock song format, of Montreal is always refreshing because their arrangements ebb and flow like a movie soundtrack or the movement of a symphony as opposed to verse chorus verse. Their creativity and uniqueness continue to rise above the ocean of ephemeral, cookie-cutter bands.

See more & listen to the full album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/003-Music-Review-of-Montreal-Aureate-Gloom.html
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REVIEW: of Montreal - Aureate Gloom
By: Daniel Ward
Time passes quickly: it’s hard to believe that of Montreal have been making albums for nearly twenty years and that their thirteenth album drops this month on Polyvinyl.  Wonderful as ever and just as expected - imagine a record that touches on everything from David Bowie, Prince, Black Sabbath and Sonic Youth and you’ll have Aureate Gloom.

Musically the record is all over the place, but of Montreal are masters and always make it work.  The album’s opener “Bassem Sabry” begins with a guitar riff that sounds like Toni Iommi’s lead-in to Black Sabbath’s “Iron Man”, and the song escalates into funk, complete with 70s style strings and wah-wah guitars.  

The lyrics are equally whimsical with lines like “I believe in witches, I believe in you.” The intro guitars on “Last Rites at the Jane Hotel” sound like something Mick Ronson would have played on Aladdin Sane, and falsetto vocals on the chorus call Prince to mind.  The shifting moods, tones and musical arrangements are always quirky, strange, glamorous and sexual at the same time.  

With so many bands that subscribe to a typical rock song format, of Montreal is always refreshing because their arrangements ebb and flow like a movie soundtrack or the movement of a symphony as opposed to verse chorus verse. Their creativity and uniqueness continue to rise above the ocean of ephemeral, cookie-cutter bands.

See more & listen to the full album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/003-Music-Review-of-Montreal-Aureate-Gloom.html
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REVIEW: Moon Duo - Shadow of the Sun
By: Jess Sanchez
Simplicity never seemed so varied and dreamy as Moon Duo creates, and the band’s third album Shadow of the Sun has stayed true to their unique sound. Using the solid foundation of a drum machine (and occasionally contributions from drummer John Jeffrey) the Duo of Ripley Johnson and Sanae Yamada drench their songs in hot and heavy psychedelic bliss.

Guitarist Johnson and Keyboardist Yamada lend their whispering vocals to each track, complementing the blustery synth that whirls through Shadow of the Sun. Legend foretold that this album was created in a dark Portland basement – which was new recording territory for the Duo. The result however, would have anyone believe there might be magic to be found in basements all over Portland.

The first single from the album, “Animal” is unlike the rest of the album entirely. A fast driving frantic song with howling guitar and haunting keys. It stands alone as distinctly

“punkish” in a sea of foamy psyche-rock, and may even be entirely unique to the Duo’s collective catalogue. Shadow of the Sun finishes its 9 track odyssey with “Animal,” perhaps to snap you out of the kaleidoscopic dreamscape you’ve fallen into.

Shadow of the Sun will be available March 3rd via Sacred Bones Records.

See more & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/002-Music-Review-Moon-Duo-Shadow-Of-The-Sun.html
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REVIEW: Moon Duo - Shadow of the Sun
By: Jess Sanchez
Simplicity never seemed so varied and dreamy as Moon Duo creates, and the band’s third album Shadow of the Sun has stayed true to their unique sound. Using the solid foundation of a drum machine (and occasionally contributions from drummer John Jeffrey) the Duo of Ripley Johnson and Sanae Yamada drench their songs in hot and heavy psychedelic bliss.

Guitarist Johnson and Keyboardist Yamada lend their whispering vocals to each track, complementing the blustery synth that whirls through Shadow of the Sun. Legend foretold that this album was created in a dark Portland basement – which was new recording territory for the Duo. The result however, would have anyone believe there might be magic to be found in basements all over Portland.

The first single from the album, “Animal” is unlike the rest of the album entirely. A fast driving frantic song with howling guitar and haunting keys. It stands alone as distinctly

“punkish” in a sea of foamy psyche-rock, and may even be entirely unique to the Duo’s collective catalogue. Shadow of the Sun finishes its 9 track odyssey with “Animal,” perhaps to snap you out of the kaleidoscopic dreamscape you’ve fallen into.

Shadow of the Sun will be available March 3rd via Sacred Bones Records.

See more & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/002-Music-Review-Moon-Duo-Shadow-Of-The-Sun.html
1
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REVIEW: Swervedriver - I Wasn't Born To Lose You
By: Andrea
As one of the most influential shoegaze groups back in the 90s, Swervedriver have been leading the charge alongside bands the likes of My Bloody Valentine and Slowdive, but they never did completely fit with the aesthetical standards of the scene.

Although the aforementioned group share the same fondness for thick, roomy and blurred-out sonic landscapes, Swervedriver have always been known to embrace a less gloomy sound that introduces elements of American melodic hardcore punk and emo (Adolescents, Jawbreaker…) as well as alternative rock a la Sonic Youth.

With their latest studio effort “I Wasn't Born To Lose You,” Swervedriver set out to pick up from where they left. The album is essentially a catalyst of pop sensibility and rock energy: If you strip down the walls of guitars, the massive delays and reverb layers, all you get is a handful of really catchy song that are refreshingly simple and catchy.

This album probably won’t appeal to the shoegaze purist looking for a doomy and deadbeat full immersion in soundscapes with lyrics that are barely intelligible (I mean that non-derogatively, as the blurred-out and fuzzy nature of the genre is something that appeals greatly to me!)

On the other hand, I can see this album as a perfect introduction to shoegaze for newcomers to the genre, as it sort of scales down the genre’s quite extreme characteristics by blending them with a pleasant balance of rock, emo and pop.

See more & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/001-Music-Review-Swervedriver.html
1
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REVIEW: Swervedriver - I Wasn't Born To Lose You
By: Andrea
As one of the most influential shoegaze groups back in the 90s, Swervedriver have been leading the charge alongside bands the likes of My Bloody Valentine and Slowdive, but they never did completely fit with the aesthetical standards of the scene.

Although the aforementioned group share the same fondness for thick, roomy and blurred-out sonic landscapes, Swervedriver have always been known to embrace a less gloomy sound that introduces elements of American melodic hardcore punk and emo (Adolescents, Jawbreaker…) as well as alternative rock a la Sonic Youth.

With their latest studio effort “I Wasn't Born To Lose You,” Swervedriver set out to pick up from where they left. The album is essentially a catalyst of pop sensibility and rock energy: If you strip down the walls of guitars, the massive delays and reverb layers, all you get is a handful of really catchy song that are refreshingly simple and catchy.

This album probably won’t appeal to the shoegaze purist looking for a doomy and deadbeat full immersion in soundscapes with lyrics that are barely intelligible (I mean that non-derogatively, as the blurred-out and fuzzy nature of the genre is something that appeals greatly to me!)

On the other hand, I can see this album as a perfect introduction to shoegaze for newcomers to the genre, as it sort of scales down the genre’s quite extreme characteristics by blending them with a pleasant balance of rock, emo and pop.

See more & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/001-Music-Review-Swervedriver.html
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REVIEW: of Montreal - Aureate Gloom
By: Daniel Ward
Time passes quickly: it’s hard to believe that of Montreal have been making albums for nearly twenty years and that their thirteenth album drops this month on Polyvinyl.  Wonderful as ever and just as expected - imagine a record that touches on everything from David Bowie, Prince, Black Sabbath and Sonic Youth and you’ll have Aureate Gloom.

Musically the record is all over the place, but of Montreal are masters and always make it work.  The album’s opener “Bassem Sabry” begins with a guitar riff that sounds like Toni Iommi’s lead-in to Black Sabbath’s “Iron Man”, and the song escalates into funk, complete with 70s style strings and wah-wah guitars.  

The lyrics are equally whimsical with lines like “I believe in witches, I believe in you.” The intro guitars on “Last Rites at the Jane Hotel” sound like something Mick Ronson would have played on Aladdin Sane, and falsetto vocals on the chorus call Prince to mind.  The shifting moods, tones and musical arrangements are always quirky, strange, glamorous and sexual at the same time.  

With so many bands that subscribe to a typical rock song format, of Montreal is always refreshing because their arrangements ebb and flow like a movie soundtrack or the movement of a symphony as opposed to verse chorus verse. Their creativity and uniqueness continue to rise above the ocean of ephemeral, cookie-cutter bands.

See more & listen to the full album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/003-Music-Review-of-Montreal-Aureate-Gloom.html
1
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REVIEW: Moon Duo - Shadow of the Sun
By: Jess Sanchez
Simplicity never seemed so varied and dreamy as Moon Duo creates, and the band’s third album Shadow of the Sun has stayed true to their unique sound. Using the solid foundation of a drum machine (and occasionally contributions from drummer John Jeffrey) the Duo of Ripley Johnson and Sanae Yamada drench their songs in hot and heavy psychedelic bliss.

Guitarist Johnson and Keyboardist Yamada lend their whispering vocals to each track, complementing the blustery synth that whirls through Shadow of the Sun. Legend foretold that this album was created in a dark Portland basement – which was new recording territory for the Duo. The result however, would have anyone believe there might be magic to be found in basements all over Portland.

The first single from the album, “Animal” is unlike the rest of the album entirely. A fast driving frantic song with howling guitar and haunting keys. It stands alone as distinctly

“punkish” in a sea of foamy psyche-rock, and may even be entirely unique to the Duo’s collective catalogue. Shadow of the Sun finishes its 9 track odyssey with “Animal,” perhaps to snap you out of the kaleidoscopic dreamscape you’ve fallen into.

Shadow of the Sun will be available March 3rd via Sacred Bones Records.

See more & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/002-Music-Review-Moon-Duo-Shadow-Of-The-Sun.html
1
Add a comment...
 
REVIEW: Moon Duo - Shadow of the Sun
By: Jess Sanchez
Simplicity never seemed so varied and dreamy as Moon Duo creates, and the band’s third album Shadow of the Sun has stayed true to their unique sound. Using the solid foundation of a drum machine (and occasionally contributions from drummer John Jeffrey) the Duo of Ripley Johnson and Sanae Yamada drench their songs in hot and heavy psychedelic bliss.

Guitarist Johnson and Keyboardist Yamada lend their whispering vocals to each track, complementing the blustery synth that whirls through Shadow of the Sun. Legend foretold that this album was created in a dark Portland basement – which was new recording territory for the Duo. The result however, would have anyone believe there might be magic to be found in basements all over Portland.

The first single from the album, “Animal” is unlike the rest of the album entirely. A fast driving frantic song with howling guitar and haunting keys. It stands alone as distinctly

“punkish” in a sea of foamy psyche-rock, and may even be entirely unique to the Duo’s collective catalogue. Shadow of the Sun finishes its 9 track odyssey with “Animal,” perhaps to snap you out of the kaleidoscopic dreamscape you’ve fallen into.

Shadow of the Sun will be available March 3rd via Sacred Bones Records.

See more & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/002-Music-Review-Moon-Duo-Shadow-Of-The-Sun.html
2
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REVIEW: Swervedriver - I Wasn't Born To Lose You
By: Andrea
As one of the most influential shoegaze groups back in the 90s, Swervedriver have been leading the charge alongside bands the likes of My Bloody Valentine and Slowdive, but they never did completely fit with the aesthetical standards of the scene.

Although the aforementioned group share the same fondness for thick, roomy and blurred-out sonic landscapes, Swervedriver have always been known to embrace a less gloomy sound that introduces elements of American melodic hardcore punk and emo (Adolescents, Jawbreaker…) as well as alternative rock a la Sonic Youth.

With their latest studio effort “I Wasn't Born To Lose You,” Swervedriver set out to pick up from where they left. The album is essentially a catalyst of pop sensibility and rock energy: If you strip down the walls of guitars, the massive delays and reverb layers, all you get is a handful of really catchy song that are refreshingly simple and catchy.

This album probably won’t appeal to the shoegaze purist looking for a doomy and deadbeat full immersion in soundscapes with lyrics that are barely intelligible (I mean that non-derogatively, as the blurred-out and fuzzy nature of the genre is something that appeals greatly to me!)

On the other hand, I can see this album as a perfect introduction to shoegaze for newcomers to the genre, as it sort of scales down the genre’s quite extreme characteristics by blending them with a pleasant balance of rock, emo and pop.

See more & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/001-Music-Review-Swervedriver.html
1
Add a comment...
 
REVIEW: Swervedriver - I Wasn't Born To Lose You
By: Andrea
As one of the most influential shoegaze groups back in the 90s, Swervedriver have been leading the charge alongside bands the likes of My Bloody Valentine and Slowdive, but they never did completely fit with the aesthetical standards of the scene.

Although the aforementioned group share the same fondness for thick, roomy and blurred-out sonic landscapes, Swervedriver have always been known to embrace a less gloomy sound that introduces elements of American melodic hardcore punk and emo (Adolescents, Jawbreaker…) as well as alternative rock a la Sonic Youth.

With their latest studio effort “I Wasn't Born To Lose You,” Swervedriver set out to pick up from where they left. The album is essentially a catalyst of pop sensibility and rock energy: If you strip down the walls of guitars, the massive delays and reverb layers, all you get is a handful of really catchy song that are refreshingly simple and catchy.

This album probably won’t appeal to the shoegaze purist looking for a doomy and deadbeat full immersion in soundscapes with lyrics that are barely intelligible (I mean that non-derogatively, as the blurred-out and fuzzy nature of the genre is something that appeals greatly to me!)

On the other hand, I can see this album as a perfect introduction to shoegaze for newcomers to the genre, as it sort of scales down the genre’s quite extreme characteristics by blending them with a pleasant balance of rock, emo and pop.

See more & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/001-Music-Review-Swervedriver.html
1
Add a comment...
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Indie music news, music festivals in 2014, videos and MP3 for music and film, streaming music sites and music technology.
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Spacelab is a collective, bringing you the best indie music news, music festivals in 2014 and media from the independent music scene. This includes indie rock, electronic music and alternative music. Also covered are streaming music sites and services as well as digital music news and technology. Check out music videos and MP3 from Spacelab TV.
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