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REVIEW: Swervedriver - I Wasn't Born To Lose You
By: Andrea
As one of the most influential shoegaze groups back in the 90s, Swervedriver have been leading the charge alongside bands the likes of My Bloody Valentine and Slowdive, but they never did completely fit with the aesthetical standards of the scene.

Although the aforementioned group share the same fondness for thick, roomy and blurred-out sonic landscapes, Swervedriver have always been known to embrace a less gloomy sound that introduces elements of American melodic hardcore punk and emo (Adolescents, Jawbreaker…) as well as alternative rock a la Sonic Youth.

With their latest studio effort “I Wasn't Born To Lose You,” Swervedriver set out to pick up from where they left. The album is essentially a catalyst of pop sensibility and rock energy: If you strip down the walls of guitars, the massive delays and reverb layers, all you get is a handful of really catchy song that are refreshingly simple and catchy.

This album probably won’t appeal to the shoegaze purist looking for a doomy and deadbeat full immersion in soundscapes with lyrics that are barely intelligible (I mean that non-derogatively, as the blurred-out and fuzzy nature of the genre is something that appeals greatly to me!)

On the other hand, I can see this album as a perfect introduction to shoegaze for newcomers to the genre, as it sort of scales down the genre’s quite extreme characteristics by blending them with a pleasant balance of rock, emo and pop.

See more & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/001-Music-Review-Swervedriver.html
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REVIEW: Swervedriver - I Wasn't Born To Lose You
By: Andrea
As one of the most influential shoegaze groups back in the 90s, Swervedriver have been leading the charge alongside bands the likes of My Bloody Valentine and Slowdive, but they never did completely fit with the aesthetical standards of the scene.

Although the aforementioned group share the same fondness for thick, roomy and blurred-out sonic landscapes, Swervedriver have always been known to embrace a less gloomy sound that introduces elements of American melodic hardcore punk and emo (Adolescents, Jawbreaker…) as well as alternative rock a la Sonic Youth.

With their latest studio effort “I Wasn't Born To Lose You,” Swervedriver set out to pick up from where they left. The album is essentially a catalyst of pop sensibility and rock energy: If you strip down the walls of guitars, the massive delays and reverb layers, all you get is a handful of really catchy song that are refreshingly simple and catchy.

This album probably won’t appeal to the shoegaze purist looking for a doomy and deadbeat full immersion in soundscapes with lyrics that are barely intelligible (I mean that non-derogatively, as the blurred-out and fuzzy nature of the genre is something that appeals greatly to me!)

On the other hand, I can see this album as a perfect introduction to shoegaze for newcomers to the genre, as it sort of scales down the genre’s quite extreme characteristics by blending them with a pleasant balance of rock, emo and pop.

See more & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/001-Music-Review-Swervedriver.html
1
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REVIEW: Swervedriver - I Wasn't Born To Lose You
By: Andrea
As one of the most influential shoegaze groups back in the 90s, Swervedriver have been leading the charge alongside bands the likes of My Bloody Valentine and Slowdive, but they never did completely fit with the aesthetical standards of the scene.

Although the aforementioned group share the same fondness for thick, roomy and blurred-out sonic landscapes, Swervedriver have always been known to embrace a less gloomy sound that introduces elements of American melodic hardcore punk and emo (Adolescents, Jawbreaker…) as well as alternative rock a la Sonic Youth.

With their latest studio effort “I Wasn't Born To Lose You,” Swervedriver set out to pick up from where they left. The album is essentially a catalyst of pop sensibility and rock energy: If you strip down the walls of guitars, the massive delays and reverb layers, all you get is a handful of really catchy song that are refreshingly simple and catchy.

This album probably won’t appeal to the shoegaze purist looking for a doomy and deadbeat full immersion in soundscapes with lyrics that are barely intelligible (I mean that non-derogatively, as the blurred-out and fuzzy nature of the genre is something that appeals greatly to me!)

On the other hand, I can see this album as a perfect introduction to shoegaze for newcomers to the genre, as it sort of scales down the genre’s quite extreme characteristics by blending them with a pleasant balance of rock, emo and pop.

See more & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/001-Music-Review-Swervedriver.html
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REVIEW: Phosphorescent - Live at the Music Hall
By: Daniel Ward
Phosphorescent is the moniker for Matthew Houck, a resident of Athens, Georgia, whose career has spanned fifteen years and seven studio albums.

Since early on, Phosphorescent has received strong critical acclaim and has been compared to folk-greats Bob Dylan and Will Oldham. Houck has shown his respect and commitment to the genre by even dedicating an entire album to Willie Nelson. Phosphorescent’s latest record, Live at the Music Hall, was recorded at the end of a ten-month tour in support of his seventh album, Muchacho and is snapshot of the group’s live prowess.

During four sold-out concerts at the Music Hall of Williamsburg in December 2013, Phosphorescent’s six-piece band documented more than ten hours of music on multi-track recorders. The original recordings were whittled down into a nineteen-song album that contains songs from throughout the band’s career.

At first listen it is obvious from the flawless performances that this band has spent a lot of time on tour and that this is the grand finale. Also, maybe not surprisingly, it the overall sound is much more stripped down and raw than many of the studio recordings.

Maybe this album will not have the impact of Dylan’s Before The Flood, but for fans of Phosphorescent this offers alternative versions to some of their best songs performed at the group’s peak.

See more and watch live performances at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/02-February/010-Music-Review-Phosphorescent-Live-At-The-Music-Hall.html
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REVIEW: Phosphorescent - Live at the Music Hall
By: Daniel Ward
Phosphorescent is the moniker for Matthew Houck, a resident of Athens, Georgia, whose career has spanned fifteen years and seven studio albums.

Since early on, Phosphorescent has received strong critical acclaim and has been compared to folk-greats Bob Dylan and Will Oldham. Houck has shown his respect and commitment to the genre by even dedicating an entire album to Willie Nelson. Phosphorescent’s latest record, Live at the Music Hall, was recorded at the end of a ten-month tour in support of his seventh album, Muchacho and is snapshot of the group’s live prowess.

During four sold-out concerts at the Music Hall of Williamsburg in December 2013, Phosphorescent’s six-piece band documented more than ten hours of music on multi-track recorders. The original recordings were whittled down into a nineteen-song album that contains songs from throughout the band’s career.

At first listen it is obvious from the flawless performances that this band has spent a lot of time on tour and that this is the grand finale. Also, maybe not surprisingly, it the overall sound is much more stripped down and raw than many of the studio recordings.

Maybe this album will not have the impact of Dylan’s Before The Flood, but for fans of Phosphorescent this offers alternative versions to some of their best songs performed at the group’s peak.

See more and watch live performances at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/02-February/010-Music-Review-Phosphorescent-Live-At-The-Music-Hall.html
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REVIEW: Swervedriver - I Wasn't Born To Lose You
By: Andrea
As one of the most influential shoegaze groups back in the 90s, Swervedriver have been leading the charge alongside bands the likes of My Bloody Valentine and Slowdive, but they never did completely fit with the aesthetical standards of the scene.

Although the aforementioned group share the same fondness for thick, roomy and blurred-out sonic landscapes, Swervedriver have always been known to embrace a less gloomy sound that introduces elements of American melodic hardcore punk and emo (Adolescents, Jawbreaker…) as well as alternative rock a la Sonic Youth.

With their latest studio effort “I Wasn't Born To Lose You,” Swervedriver set out to pick up from where they left. The album is essentially a catalyst of pop sensibility and rock energy: If you strip down the walls of guitars, the massive delays and reverb layers, all you get is a handful of really catchy song that are refreshingly simple and catchy.

This album probably won’t appeal to the shoegaze purist looking for a doomy and deadbeat full immersion in soundscapes with lyrics that are barely intelligible (I mean that non-derogatively, as the blurred-out and fuzzy nature of the genre is something that appeals greatly to me!)

On the other hand, I can see this album as a perfect introduction to shoegaze for newcomers to the genre, as it sort of scales down the genre’s quite extreme characteristics by blending them with a pleasant balance of rock, emo and pop.

See more & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/001-Music-Review-Swervedriver.html
1
Add a comment...
 
REVIEW: Swervedriver - I Wasn't Born To Lose You
By: Andrea
As one of the most influential shoegaze groups back in the 90s, Swervedriver have been leading the charge alongside bands the likes of My Bloody Valentine and Slowdive, but they never did completely fit with the aesthetical standards of the scene.

Although the aforementioned group share the same fondness for thick, roomy and blurred-out sonic landscapes, Swervedriver have always been known to embrace a less gloomy sound that introduces elements of American melodic hardcore punk and emo (Adolescents, Jawbreaker…) as well as alternative rock a la Sonic Youth.

With their latest studio effort “I Wasn't Born To Lose You,” Swervedriver set out to pick up from where they left. The album is essentially a catalyst of pop sensibility and rock energy: If you strip down the walls of guitars, the massive delays and reverb layers, all you get is a handful of really catchy song that are refreshingly simple and catchy.

This album probably won’t appeal to the shoegaze purist looking for a doomy and deadbeat full immersion in soundscapes with lyrics that are barely intelligible (I mean that non-derogatively, as the blurred-out and fuzzy nature of the genre is something that appeals greatly to me!)

On the other hand, I can see this album as a perfect introduction to shoegaze for newcomers to the genre, as it sort of scales down the genre’s quite extreme characteristics by blending them with a pleasant balance of rock, emo and pop.

See more & listen to music from the album at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/03-March/001-Music-Review-Swervedriver.html
2
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REVIEW: Phosphorescent - Live at the Music Hall
By: Daniel Ward
Phosphorescent is the moniker for Matthew Houck, a resident of Athens, Georgia, whose career has spanned fifteen years and seven studio albums.

Since early on, Phosphorescent has received strong critical acclaim and has been compared to folk-greats Bob Dylan and Will Oldham. Houck has shown his respect and commitment to the genre by even dedicating an entire album to Willie Nelson. Phosphorescent’s latest record, Live at the Music Hall, was recorded at the end of a ten-month tour in support of his seventh album, Muchacho and is snapshot of the group’s live prowess.

During four sold-out concerts at the Music Hall of Williamsburg in December 2013, Phosphorescent’s six-piece band documented more than ten hours of music on multi-track recorders. The original recordings were whittled down into a nineteen-song album that contains songs from throughout the band’s career.

At first listen it is obvious from the flawless performances that this band has spent a lot of time on tour and that this is the grand finale. Also, maybe not surprisingly, it the overall sound is much more stripped down and raw than many of the studio recordings.

Maybe this album will not have the impact of Dylan’s Before The Flood, but for fans of Phosphorescent this offers alternative versions to some of their best songs performed at the group’s peak.

See more and watch live performances at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/02-February/010-Music-Review-Phosphorescent-Live-At-The-Music-Hall.html
1
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REVIEW: Phosphorescent - Live at the Music Hall
By: Daniel Ward
Phosphorescent is the moniker for Matthew Houck, a resident of Athens, Georgia, whose career has spanned fifteen years and seven studio albums.

Since early on, Phosphorescent has received strong critical acclaim and has been compared to folk-greats Bob Dylan and Will Oldham. Houck has shown his respect and commitment to the genre by even dedicating an entire album to Willie Nelson. Phosphorescent’s latest record, Live at the Music Hall, was recorded at the end of a ten-month tour in support of his seventh album, Muchacho and is snapshot of the group’s live prowess.

During four sold-out concerts at the Music Hall of Williamsburg in December 2013, Phosphorescent’s six-piece band documented more than ten hours of music on multi-track recorders. The original recordings were whittled down into a nineteen-song album that contains songs from throughout the band’s career.

At first listen it is obvious from the flawless performances that this band has spent a lot of time on tour and that this is the grand finale. Also, maybe not surprisingly, it the overall sound is much more stripped down and raw than many of the studio recordings.

Maybe this album will not have the impact of Dylan’s Before The Flood, but for fans of Phosphorescent this offers alternative versions to some of their best songs performed at the group’s peak.

See more and watch live performances at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/02-February/010-Music-Review-Phosphorescent-Live-At-The-Music-Hall.html
1
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REVIEW: Phosphorescent - Live at the Music Hall
By: Daniel Ward
Phosphorescent is the moniker for Matthew Houck, a resident of Athens, Georgia, whose career has spanned fifteen years and seven studio albums.

Since early on, Phosphorescent has received strong critical acclaim and has been compared to folk-greats Bob Dylan and Will Oldham. Houck has shown his respect and commitment to the genre by even dedicating an entire album to Willie Nelson. Phosphorescent’s latest record, Live at the Music Hall, was recorded at the end of a ten-month tour in support of his seventh album, Muchacho and is snapshot of the group’s live prowess.

During four sold-out concerts at the Music Hall of Williamsburg in December 2013, Phosphorescent’s six-piece band documented more than ten hours of music on multi-track recorders. The original recordings were whittled down into a nineteen-song album that contains songs from throughout the band’s career.

At first listen it is obvious from the flawless performances that this band has spent a lot of time on tour and that this is the grand finale. Also, maybe not surprisingly, it the overall sound is much more stripped down and raw than many of the studio recordings.

Maybe this album will not have the impact of Dylan’s Before The Flood, but for fans of Phosphorescent this offers alternative versions to some of their best songs performed at the group’s peak.

See more and watch live performances at: http://www.thespacelab.tv/Music-Reviews/2015/02-February/010-Music-Review-Phosphorescent-Live-At-The-Music-Hall.html
2
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Indie music news, music festivals in 2014, videos and MP3 for music and film, streaming music sites and music technology.
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Spacelab is a collective, bringing you the best indie music news, music festivals in 2014 and media from the independent music scene. This includes indie rock, electronic music and alternative music. Also covered are streaming music sites and services as well as digital music news and technology. Check out music videos and MP3 from Spacelab TV.
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