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Tim Leggett
Tim Leggett - Project Manager, HR Manager, Safety Manager, MBA Student
Tim Leggett - Project Manager, HR Manager, Safety Manager, MBA Student
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100 Percent Of Beer Tested Had At Least 5 Times The Amount Glyphosate Allowed By Law http://rgn.bz/oBsk

Biochemical giant Monsanto has found itself under increased scrutiny after the World Health Organization recently announced that glyphosate is likely carcinogenic to humans.

Also, in the US, California recently labelled Monsanto’s Roundup — as known to cause cancer. Under the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, chemicals that cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm are required to be listed and published by the state.

The slew of studies showing the adverse health effects of Roundup on laboratory animals as well as humans are overwhelmingly ominous which makes news of the chemical being found in high quantities in beer that much more worrisome.

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This guy has skills, without them he would probably be a gonner.
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Where will it end, I am very curious about how this will play out. Amazing!
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crossrider.com
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Clearly this bloke has been a good leader.
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The Crazy New ‘Sponge’ That Can Generate Steam From Sunlight http://b4in.org/r6f9 

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology unveiled a new material this week that provides a highly efficient way to convert sunlight into steam and holds major potential for improving technologies like desalination of water and solar thermal power — all with a four-inch graphite ‘sponge.’

The setup developed by MIT consists of a layer of graphite flakes and carbon foam beneath that. It’s porous, which enables the disc to float on water, and the dark color of the graphite attracts maximum energy from the sun.

The end result is a system that converts 85 percent of incoming solar energy into steam — far more efficient than previous methods.

“Basically, if you heat up the whole volume of the water, you don’t raise the temperature very much,” Gang Chen, a professor of mechanical engineering at MIT, told ThinkProgress. “However, if you only heat up a small amount of water, then the temperature rise could be high.”

Chen explained that by floating the graphite on the surface of the water, the researchers were able to concentrate the maximum amount of incoming sunlight and adding the foam to the bottom provided a further layer of insulation.

The ability to create steam quickly and efficiently, with inexpensive materials and using only sunlight, has tremendous implications.

“Steam is important for desalination, hygiene systems, and sterilization,” said Hadi Ghasemi, a postdoc in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering who led the development of the structure.

“Especially in remote areas where the sun is the only source of energy, if you can generate steam with solar energy, it would be very useful.”

Chen said there are two potential applications he’s particularly excited about: developing more efficient solar thermal power plants and creating a cheaper and more accessible way to treat water.

Concentrated solar plants like the massive Solana facility in Arizona use a parabolic trough system — a large structure that incorporates mirrors to focus the sun’s heat on pipes, heating a synthetic oil that flows to boilers, which create the steam that drives turbines to produce electricity, much like a traditional power plant.

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