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Ross Exton
350 followers -
Science Presenter
Science Presenter

350 followers
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A gramophone - or phonograph - turns the vibrations of a needle moving along a record into sound. The grooves etched into the disc correspond to the shape of the soundwaves made as the vibration travels through the air to your ears. If you have an old record at home that you don't mind scratching, you can make your own paper gramophone. Attach a pin to a paper cone, use a pencil and elastic band to spin the record, and listen to the grooves for yourself. For more information on sound waves, vibrations, and the trick to listening to an old record using your teeth, check out the source video: https://youtu.be/Cuwj3I4ZFMU
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Got an old record lying around at home, but no way to play it? In this video from At-Bristol, I show you how to make a paper gramophone and play a vinyl record with your teeth!

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My new video explores the science of sound as I try to play an old vinyl with my teeth...

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Hourglasses have been used for centuries to mark the passage of time. Indeed, the phrase 'sands of time' originates from these chronological instruments. But can you use science to make an 'anti-gravity' hourglass that fills from the bottom to the top? Well, by performing a density displacement trick, using oil, water and marbling ink you can try this experiment with the kids at home. For more information on all of the materials you'll need, check out the source video: https://youtu.be/OG_fIN_P0UE 
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Hourglasses are synonomous with the passage of time, and have been used for centuries by cultures across the globe. But can you use science to make an 'Anti-Gravity Hourglass'? My latest video from At-Bristol shows you how!

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Looking for a simple science activity to try with the kids on a rainy day? Find a slinky, a metal knife, a plastic cup, and make some sci-fi sound effects whilst learning about sound and vibration:

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My latest At-Bristol production explores the sounds of science fiction and shows you how you can make your own sound effects using a metal slinky!

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The holiday season is a time for friends, family, and eating lots and lots of turkey. In this gif, you can see the mechanical action of the muscles and tendons at work in the leg of a dead turkey being prepared for the oven. I'm not pulling your leg, this turkey might be moving, but it is well and truely dead.

Mechanically moving the leg in this way causes the muscles to pull on the tendons, which are attached to the fingers of the claw. After removing the lower leg, it's possible to simulate the action of the muscles by physically pulling on the tendons like a gruesome puppeteer.

For more bird anatomy, check out the source video for the full Christmas turkey dissection: https://youtu.be/NP2ILVtgYdM
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In my latest At-Bristol production, we take a look at what we can find inside a turkey, just in time for Christmas dinner!

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‘Light-painting’ is a photographic technique which uses a source of light to draw an image in the air whilst taking a long-exposure photograph. By capturing the light from a moving source, you're able to create an image which shows its motion over time. In the 1940's, photographer Gjon Mili attached lights to the boots of ice-skaters to demonstrate the movement of their bodies and they gracefully glided around the ice. This is a modern recreation of that photograph, using modern photographic techniques. To find out how to make your own light-paintings, check out the source video: https://youtu.be/CkvWzd4TKD8 
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