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Aakheperure Merytsekhmet
If it's art, I do it.
If it's art, I do it.
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While I search for a place to take this Collection because Google + is closing down, here, have a look at Egyptologist Chris Naunton's no doubt brilliant new book. (I haven't got it yet!)
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G+ Blogger, pretty picture poster, content creator, house trained, looking for new home
I'm not sure where I can take my weekly Egyptology blog, which saddens me deeply - if you have any suggestions where educators can meaningfully hang out that aren't Facebook (sorry, I was HERE for a reason) then let me know.

I'd be looking for a place where I can share Egyptology news via links and images with control over moderation. An ability to post my art separately would be awesome but... I suspect unlikely. In social media one is expected to have only one interest and post on only one topic or risk losing followers which is why I liked Collections so much.

Was considering migrating content to Blogger but since it's also owned by Google that could be the next thing they can without warning, is it worth the effort? I don't know.

Meanwhile I'm IG @aakheperure and Twitter @Aakhperure - same avatar + banner pic.
I don't post much on either platform due to their limitations so your feeds will not be spammed.
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The Penn Museum and "The case of the Falcons that Faced the Wrong Way"
OK, so it's not exactly a mystery but it's a good story.
Read it by clicking the image below.
Kudos to the eagle eyed - or should that be falcon eyed - folks who pointed out the error and pats on the back to the museum for taking that on board, researching, correcting and reposting!
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Horus in Faience vector redraw
Redrawing my paintings, especially those originally on papyrus is often a slow and difficult process, but it allows me to do more with the artwork, including printing at a much larger size - the papyrus paintings are limited due to the original media and the fact I only have an A4 scanner. While I can scan other larger works in pieces and restitch them with software, works on papyrus are so difficult to reassemble as to make it not really worthwhile when I could expend that time converting the design into vector art. I've been nibbling at this one for several months as I find my patience for it runs out very quickly, but I will get there eventually.




#workinprogress #horus #papyrus #vectorart
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Well, I can can confirm that the Aztec | Mixtec sign for water (Atl) is a lot harder to draw than the Egyptian hieroglyph equivalent :D



#aztec #mixtec #workinprogress #trecena
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Excavations at: The North Cliffs Cemetery 2018, Amarna by Anna Stevens and Gretchen Dabbs
Of the three major cemeteries at Akhenaton's city of Akhetaton (Amarna) the North Cliffs cemetery is discussed in this informative report of the excavations in 2018.
The report highlights some of the similarities and differences between the cemetery sites, but also illustrates some of the difficulties Egyptologists regularly face in attempting to reconstruct site useage: disturbances of the site by looters over a period of time.
Investigation of these cemetery sites informs our knowledge of what life may have been like for the citizens of Amarna.
If you are interested in the Amarna Period, then the Amarna Project website is the place to get the latest information about work being carried out at the site.

h/t: @AnnaS_Amarna
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Trecena 7. Mazatl - Deer
The more trecena I draw, the more I like to entertain the notion that the Aztecs might have invented Pokémon...
;)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trecena




#aztec #trecena #deer #mazatl #workinprogress
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Introducing Naqada and Nubt, Pre-Dynastic onwards
This week I'd like to share the Egypt Exploration Society's latest survey and site report from one of the most important Pre-Dynastic sites in Upper Egypt. You may not have heard of this site, (yet!) but you've probably heard of its local deity: Set.

Nubt was an important city in Upper Egypt and lies in the region of 2 other important cities which are fairly well known:

☥ Abydos (Abdju) - an important cult centre and place of pilgrimage throughout Egypt's history and
☥ Hierakonpolis (Nekhen) - the probable home town of King Narmer and findspot of the famous 'Narmer Palette', and the enclosure of 2nd Dynasty King Khasekhemwy whose nomenclature included references to both Horus and Set.

Further study of Nubt may help clarify the relationship between the three cities and perhaps more interestingly (to me at any rate), to inform our understanding of their primary deities: Osiris, Horus and Set.

"Whereas Nubt occupies an important place in the history of Egyptology, the site has in recent years been overshadowed by the extraordinary findings at Abydos and Hierakonpolis. The confusion resulting from the terminology has aggravated this. Petrie named the site ‘Naqada’ despite the fact modern Naqada is located several kilometres to the south and there being several archaeological sites in between as well as at modern Naqada. Here the ancient name of the dynastic part of the site is used: Nubt, ‘Gold Town’.

The History of Nubt
The city of Nubt is most famous for the Predynastic settlement of South Town and its associated cemeteries, such as the large communal cemetery N East and the elite cemetery N West, as well as the smaller special cemeteries of N T, N G, and N South. The dates for these graves range from Naqada IA (ca. 3,900 BC) to Naqada IIIC1 (ca. 3.060 BC). There are only a few Dynastic cemeteries that range from the Old Kingdom to the New Kingdom, as well as Ptolemaic to Roman. The city is spread over three spurs and the lower area in front of them. The earliest occupation was on Temple Spur, probably dating to Naqada I. Occupation on South Town Spur seems to begin from early Naqada II. This area seems to consist of a palace area, with indications for other areas of activities (including storage facilities and workshops).

The temple area at Nubt has a large amount of research potential, Petrie found evidence of a 4th Dynasty temple, which is overlain by a 12th Dynasty temple, and by an 18th Dynasty temple (in which the names of Thutmose I, Thutmose III, Amenhotep II and Amenhotep III are mentioned). It is probable that all of these kings enhanced and enlarged the Temple of Seth, Lord of Nubt, which appears to have later been appropriated by Ramesses II. The largest ever faience was-Sceptre, dating to the reign of Amenhotep II, was discovered in the Temple of Seth. One of the latest objects is a vase with the name of Sheshonq, indicating that the temple continued to function into at least the Third Intermediate Period, although there is no evidence for Ptolemaic or later use. Also on the Temple Spur is a large multi-period settlement, which in all probability dates back to the earliest graves in the cemeteries. On the surface Old Kingdom beer jars can still be found, along with New Kingdom pottery.

In the desert to the west of the temple four rock-cut tombs belonging to the priests from the Temple of Seth are located, dating to the 18th Dynasty. In front of these tombs is a lot of Roman and Late Antique pottery, along with a few Middle Palaeolithic stone tools.

Another important area is Pyramid Spur, that has the minor step pyramid of Nubt (sometimes identified as Ombos, Tukh, Naqada) located on it. This pyramid was probably built by king Huni at the end of the 3rd Dynasty as part of a series of such structures all around Egypt. This structure desperately needs a lot of conservation as well as protection."

I'm looking forward to learning more about this fascinating site!

For further reading, see the reading list at the end of the article.
Petrie's original publication of Naqada and Ballas:
https://archive.org/details/cu31924028748261
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My redraw of the Jaguar Knight is done. I never got around to the Eagle counterpart in paint on paper so I've remedied that in vector art.
Sparring partners!




#aztec #eagleknight #jaguarknight #visualart
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Armchair Archaeology: The Sacred Animal Necropolis
It's been a while since we did some armchair archaeology so let's go visit the Sacred Animal Necropolis North of Saqqara by Spectrum Heritage.
I love these fantastic 3D models, they are a great way to explore and contemplate sites for experts and enthusiasts alike.

Although Saqqara was an ancient site of great significance from at least the time of the Old Kingdom as a royal burial place, it should be remembered that animal cults were prominent only quite late in ancient Egypt's history, and are an example of ongoing use of the site. It should also be remembered that although there is evidence that the ancient Egyptians could be animal lovers who wanted to commemorate their pets and take them with them into the afterlife, the animals here were offerings to the gods, often sold to pilgrims in great numbers and not always what the purported to be.

The link is to a 3D model of the site posted on Sketchfab and is probably best viewed on a desktop.
h/t @SpectrumDH (via Twitter)

Additional resources:
Map showing this temple (in blue) and associated burial areas
https://www.ucl.ac.uk/museums-static/digitalegypt/saqqara/temple/map.html
Further reading:
http://cairo.universitypressscholarship.com/view/10.5743/cairo/9789774248580.001.0001/upso-9789774248580-chapter-3
Ancient Egyptians and their attitudes to animals by Dr Campbell Price
https://egyptmanchester.wordpress.com/tag/animal-mummies/
Sketchfab
Sketchfab
sketchfab.com
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