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Aakheperure Merytsekhmet
If it's art, I do it.
If it's art, I do it.
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Aakheperure's posts

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Feature object: Claw Anklet of Sithathoryunet, Middle Kingdom
Amethysts were popular during the Middle Kingdom and this gold and amethyst anklet belonging to princess Sithathoryunet was discovered in a niche found beside the pyramid complex of 12th Dynasty King Senwosret II at Lahun (اللاهون) where there are a number of pyramids, mastaba tombs and a town which yielded huge amounts of information about everyday life in ancient Egypt. Also found were other items of jewellery and funerary objects of very high quality.
Lahun is located in Middle Egypt, south east of the Faiyum and is most likely associated with the now lost Middle Kingdom capital of Itjtawy which many scholars believe may lie near el-Lisht.
Amethysts were mined at sites like Wadi el-Hudi, south east of Aswan, from the late 11th Dynasty until the end of the 12th Dynasty but local sources were quickly exhausted.
Note: Lahun is also known as Kahun due to an error by Egyptologist W.M Flinders Petrie.

References:
http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/544232

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☥ Study Egyptology online at The University of Manchester ☥
Applications are now open for the following courses:
☥ Short Courses in Egyptology: October 2017
Six week, non-credit bearing courses in Egyptology-related topics, such as:
• Queens of Ancient Egypt
• Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt
• Tutankhamen
Registration opens May 2017
Please note that courses fill very quickly so registration may close earlier than the dates advertised
http://www.egyptologyonline.manchester.ac.uk/shortcourses/

☥ Certificate in Egyptology programme: October 2017
A three year online course which provides an opportunity for the serious, academic study of Egyptology (120 credits)
The annual fee for 2017-18 will be £1,950.
Course begins: 01 October 2017
Deadline for applications: 30 June 2017
Apply here: http://www.egyptologyonline.manchester.ac.uk/certificateinegyptology/howtoapply/

☥ Diploma in Egyptology programme: October 2017
A two year extension programme to the Certificate in Egyptology which provides for more in-depth, serious, academic study of Egyptology (120 credits)
The annual fee for 2017-18 will be £2,975.
Course begins: 01 October 2017
Deadline for applications: 30 June 2017
Apply here: http://www.egyptologyonline.manchester.ac.uk/diplomainegyptology/howtoapply/

"Do not let your heart grow weary:
follow your heart and your happiness.
Do your things on earth according to the commands of your heart."
http://www.egyptologyonline.manchester.ac.uk/


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Week 2 of Nicky's great FREE course on Warfare and Weapons via Canvas and the University of Manchester.
Week 2 covers Egypt's expansion in the search for lucrative trade and luxury resources to the south and east of its borders during the Middle Kingdom and looks at the Second Cataract forts and literary accounts of warfare from various ancient perspectives.

Dr Nicky Nielsen completed his PhD at Liverpool and joined the teaching staff of the Certificate and Diploma in Egyptology at the University of Manchester in 2016.

Remember to check my Egyptology Collection for future course details: https://goo.gl/WYe7I3

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Here be the shinies
I've labelled a lot of site excavation maps over the years but have never really had a convincing reason to include purple. Thank you Egyptian Middle Kingdom amethyst mines!!!
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The movement, textures and colours of this piece are so impressive!


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Not my art but art for me by the spouse, who insisted I photograph it, so there you have it!
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A reminder of gentler times and the power of artists to capture innocence and wonder...

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Understanding the news: The Shabtis of Userhat (Egyptian funerary statues), New Kingdom
The recently excavated tomb of Userhat in Thebes has a number of features common to New Kingdom tombs in the area, it contains a 'public' courtyard where friends and family of the deceased could leave offerings and probably contained multiple burials. It has been widely described as containing many 'funerary statues' so this post is about the most common of these statue types: Shabtis.

Also known as Shwabtis and Ushabtis, the name of these little figures may come from wSb from the Egyptian for 'I answer'.

First appearing in the Middle Kingdom (ca.2055-1650BCE), by the New Kingdom (ca.1550-1069BCE), the Shabti was the essential Afterlife accessory for any Egyptian who could afford them. Because the ancient Egyptians believed that the Afterlife would very much resemble an idealised version of the one they already knew in the Nile Valley, there would be fields to plant and work to be done; but who wants to work in the Afterlife?
"O, these shabtis, if one counts (me) off for (my) duties - now indeed an obstacle is implanted for (against) me there with -, as a man at his duties; if one counts off for you at any time which has be passed there make arable the fields, to turn over the shores, to transport by boat the sand of the West (and) of the East, 'here you are' you shall say. (1)
Although there is possible evidence that very early kings may have been buried with human and animal servants, this practice (if it proves to be the case) was abandoned early and the ever pragmatic Egyptians came up with a good solution: magical figures who would work for you. These small figures, inscribed with a magic spell and mass produced in faience are very common in the archaeological record because of the huge numbers of them produced. Ideally, a full set of Shabtis would be 365 workers, one for each day of the year and sometimes extra Overseer Shabtis were included in sets.
For further info about the discovery and pictures, click the image linked below.

References:
Chronology: Shaw. I (Ed) (2000) Oxford History of Ancient Egypt OUP, p480-481
(1) http://www.ucl.ac.uk/museums-static/digitalegypt/burialcustoms/shabtispell.html
See also:
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/museums-static/digitalegypt/burialcustoms/shabtis.html


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Today I'm continuing with Nicky's great FREE course on Warfare and Weapons via Canvas and the University of Manchester.
What? You didn't sign up? O.k, make sure you do next time! I publish course details in my Egyptology Collection https://goo.gl/WYe7I3 along with news and other information weekly.

Dr Nicky Nielsen completed his PhD and joined the teaching staff of the Certificate and Diploma in Egyptology in 2016 so unfortunately I wasn't taught by him but I was extremely impressed with the presentation he made on our graduation day that year in Manchester.

After completing 5 years study in this field online, you might think an introductory course is a bit of a comedown but this is not the case.

Doing his course gives me an opportunity to learn with a new young Egyptologist and enables me to check out a new learning platform so that I can answer questions about online learning in more detail for those new to Egyptology online. Plus I've already discovered new and fascinating resources I have never seen before, because there are new discoveries being made all the time and more and more resources are being made available online, so as you can imagine, I'm having a great time!

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Great to know some lovely folks in Albourne, United Kingdom will be sleeping like kings and queens, thanks for the sale and the feedback! Leaving the artist a note can really make their day!
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