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Stéphane Bortzmeyer
Works at AFNIC
Attended Université Paris VII
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Another small software, a RTR library written in Go (RTR is the network protocol between a router and a RPKI cache/validator)  https://github.com/bortzmeyer/GoRTR
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Stéphane Bortzmeyer

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Jan-Piet Mens originally shared:
 
A public school teacher was arrested today at John F. Kennedy International airport as he attempted to board a flight while in possession of a ruler, a protractor, a compass, a slide-rule and a calculator. At a morning press conference, Attorney General Eric Holder said he believes the man is a member of the notorious Al-Gebra movement. He did not identify the man, who has been charged by the FBI with carrying weapons of math instruction. 'Al-Gebra is a problem for us', the Attorney General said. 'They derive solutions by means and extremes, and sometimes go off on tangents in search of absolute values.' They use secret code names like “X” and “Y” and refer to themselves as “unknowns” but we have determined that they belong to a common denominator of the axis of medieval with coordinates in every country. As the Greek philanderer Isosceles used to say, “There are 3 sides to every triangle." When asked to comment on the arrest, President Obama said, “If God had wanted us to have better weapons of math instruction, he would have given us more fingers and toes.” White House aides told reporters they could not recall a more intelligent or profound statement by the President. It is believed that another Nobel Prize will follow.
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Stéphane Bortzmeyer

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Kiki Moon originally shared:
 
haHA! Now isn't that the truth!
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Stéphane Bortzmeyer

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Yoram Perez originally shared:
 
i-Karma
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Victoria D Bohler originally shared:
 
Un nouveau roman de science-fiction ; http://goo.gl/jqSU5
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(Small) DNS checking tool written in Go: http://www.bortzmeyer.org/check-soa-go.html
When you want to assert rapidly whether or not a DNS zone works fine, typical exhaustive tools like Zonecheck may be too slow. There is room for a light-and-fast tool and many people used to rely on t...
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Stéphane Bortzmeyer

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Fantasy Armor and Lady Bits « Mad Art Lab
http://madartlab.com/2011/12/14/fantasy-armor-and-lady-bits/ Very good discussion about armors for females in fantasy.
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Stéphane Bortzmeyer

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Jean-Marc Liotier originally shared:
 
"Mockery of religion is one of the most essential things [..] One of the beginnings of human emancipation is the ability to laugh at authority. It is an indispensable thing. People may call it blasphemy if they like but if they call it that they have to assume that there is something to be blasphemed, some divine word. Well, I don't accept the premise" - Christopher Hitchens
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baby-foot I love it :)
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Stéphane Bortzmeyer

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Rob Pike originally shared:
 
I was warmly surprised to see how many people responded to my Google+ post about Dennis Ritchie's untimely passing. His influence on the technical community was vast, and it's gratifying to see it recognized. When Steve Jobs died there was a wide lament - and well-deserved it was - but it's worth noting that the resurgence of Apple depended a great deal on Dennis's work with C and Unix.

The C programming language is quite old now, but still active and still very much in use. The Unix and Linux (and Mac OS X and I think even Windows) kernels are all C programs. The web browsers and major web servers are all in C or C++, and almost all of the rest of the Internet ecosystem is in C or a C-derived language (C++, Java), or a language whose implementation is in C or a C-derived language (Python, Ruby, etc.). C is also a common implementation language for network firmware. And on and on.

And that's just C.

Dennis was also half of the team that created Unix (the other half being Ken Thompson), which in some form or other (I include Linux) runs all the machines at Google's data centers and probably at most other server farms. Most web servers run above Unix kernels; most non-Microsoft web browsers run above Unix kernels in some form, even in many phones.

And speaking of phones, the software that runs the phone network is largely written in C.

But wait, there's more.

In the late 1970s, Dennis joined with Steve Johnson to port Unix to the Interdata. From this remove it's hard to see how radical the idea of a portable operating system was; back then OSes were mostly written in assembly language and were tightly coupled, both technically and by marketing, to specific computer brands. Unix, in the unusual (although not unique) position of being written in a "high-level language", could be made to run on a machine other than the PDP-11. Dennis and Steve seized the opportunity, and by the early 1980s, Unix had been ported by the not-yet-so-called open source community to essentially every mini-computer out there. That meant that if I wrote my program in C, it could run on almost every mini-computer out there. All of a sudden, the coupling between hardware and operating system was broken. Unix was the great equalizer, the driving force of the Nerd Spring that liberated programming from the grip of hardware manufacturers.

The hardware didn't matter any more, since it all ran Unix. And since it didn't matter, hardware fought with other hardware for dominance; the software was a given. Windows obviously played a role in the rise of the x86, but the Unix folks just capitalized on that. Cheap hardware meant cheap Unix installations; we all won. All that network development that started in the mid-80s happened on Unix, because that was the environment where the stuff that really mattered was done. If Unix hadn't been ported to the Interdata, the Internet, if it even existed, would be a very different place today.

I read in an obituary of Steve Jobs that Tim Berners-Lee did the first WWW development on a NeXT box, created by Jobs's company at the time. Well, you know what operating system ran on NeXTs, and what language.

Even in his modest way, I believe Dennis was very proud of his legacy. And rightfully so: few achieve a fraction as much.

So long, Dennis, and thanks for all the magic.
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Stéphane Bortzmeyer

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Rob Pike originally shared:
 
I just heard that, after a long illness, Dennis Ritchie (dmr) died at home this weekend. I have no more information.

I trust there are people here who will appreciate the reach of his contributions and mourn his passing appropriately.

He was a quiet and mostly private man, but he was also my friend, colleague, and collaborator, and the world has lost a truly great mind.
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Stéphane Bortzmeyer

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Christopher Blizzard originally shared:
 
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
printf("Goodbye, world. :(\n");
}
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Impossible de se baser dessus pour tester le retour...
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  • Université Paris VII
    Physics, 1979 - 1986