Profile cover photo
Profile photo
ReLife International Medical Center
19 followers -
ReLife International Medical Center-----Regain Your Life
ReLife International Medical Center-----Regain Your Life

19 followers
About
ReLife International Medical Center's posts

Post has attachment
Hepatocyte Growth Factor Preserves Beta Cell Mass and Mitigates Hyperglycemia in Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Mice http://bit.ly/188NTmf

Post has attachment
BBC News - Male infertility gene discovered http://bbc.in/1iVG0bc

Gene therapy treats children with rare diseases
A virus derived from HIV can safely fix broken immune systems and correct genetic diseases, suggest two new studies involving children with rare conditions.

For both studies, researchers put healthy genes into the children’s own DNA using lentiviruses, in this case genetically engineered versions of HIV that can no longer cause disease. Earlier gene therapy trials using different viruses had a flaw: When the viruses plunked themselves into the patient’s DNA, they sometimes amped up activity of neighboring cancer-causing genes, leading to leukemia. That side effect, along with the death of a young man participating in another clinical trial, nearly halted gene therapy in the United States in the early 2000s.

Now, researchers led by Luigi Naldini of the San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy in Milan have altered the lentiviruses so that they won’t accidently turn on nearby genes. The researchers then infect bone marrow stem cells with lentiviruses carrying the appropriate gene and transplant the stem cells into patients.

In one study, three boys with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, an inherited disease that disables the immune system, received gene therapy. Now, two to three years after the therapy, the former “bubble boys” have healthy immune systems, Naldini and colleagues report July 11 in Science. The boys also show no signs of developing leukemia — which should help allay concerns about the team’s gene therapy approach, says Todd Rosengart, a surgeon and gene therapy researcher at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

Post has attachment
Researchers Identify Way to Increase Gene Therapy Success
Oct. 29, 2013 — Scientists in The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital have found a way to overcome one of the biggest obstacles to using viruses to deliver therapeutic genes: how to keep the immune system from neutralizing the virus before it can deliver its genetic payload. In a study published recently in Molecular Therapy, researchers found that giving subjects a treatment to temporarily rid the body of antibodies provides the virus safe passage to targeted cells, allowing it to release a corrective or replacement gene to treat disease.
Share This:

 

Gene therapy is among the most promising treatment options for such genetic disorders as muscular dystrophy, congenital blindness and hemophilia. Scientists also are investigating gene therapy as a cure for some cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, viral infections and other acquired illnesses. To get the therapeutic gene into cells, researchers have turned to viruses, which deliver their genetic material into cells as part of their normal replication process. Time and time again, these efforts have been thwarted by the body's own immune system, which attacks the viral vector. The therapeutic genes aren't delivered and disease rages on.
Now, a team led by Louis G. Chicoine, MD, Louise Rodino-Klapac, PhD, and Jerry R. Mendell, MD, principal investigators in the Center for Gene Therapy at Nationwide Children's, has shown for the first time that using a process called plasmapheresis just before delivering a virus-packed gene therapy protects the virus long enough for it to enter the cell and deliver the gene.

Post has attachment
Stem Cells Turned Into Eggs
New research suggests that stem cells from women's ovaries can be transformed into eggs. If this really is the case, new ways of treating infertility could be revolutionized. WSJ's Gautam Naik discusses his story.
Researchers said they have transformed stem cells isolated from women's ovaries into viable-looking eggs, a provocative experiment that might suggest new ways for treating infertility.

Biologists have long held that women are born with a finite supply of eggs that gets depleted with age. The latest experiment, published in Nature Medicine, describes how stem cells found in the ovary could potentially be coaxed into rejuvenating the natural egg supply.

Post has attachment
Stem Cells Turned Into Eggs
New research suggests that stem cells from women's ovaries can be transformed into eggs. If this really is the case, new ways of treating infertility could be revolutionized. WSJ's Gautam Naik discusses his story.
Researchers said they have transformed stem cells isolated from women's ovaries into viable-looking eggs, a provocative experiment that might suggest new ways for treating infertility.

Biologists have long held that women are born with a finite supply of eggs that gets depleted with age. The latest experiment, published in Nature Medicine, describes how stem cells found in the ovary could potentially be coaxed into rejuvenating the natural egg supply.

Stem cell therapy not effective nor safe for diabetes, doctors say
Stem cell therapy--or introducing fresh cells that can regenerate to help treat disease--remains an experimental treatment for those suffering from Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. 

Experts from the the Philippine Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism (PSEM) made this announcement during a press conference held on Tuesday, saying that "no conclusive evidence that stem cell therapy is effective and safe for diabetes." 

"As such, it cannot be made available to individuals with diabetes as a standard treatment like the usual drug prescriptions. Stem cell can only be given to individuals with diabetes under controlled conditions such as, under experimental protocols of clinical trials," a statement from the PSEM said, quoting Dr. Cecilia Jimeno, PSEM President. 

PSEM, a subspecialty organization under the Philippine College of Physicians, as well as the PCP itself, belong to a coalition of other medical societies, academic institutions and other health groups that have organized themselves to educate the public about stem cell therapy. 

The coalition maintains that the effectiveness and safety of stem cell have unproven indications yet on heart, lung, neurologic, rheumatologic, kidney and gastrointestinal diseases, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, autism, cancer, aging and aesthetics, HIV, AIDS, and other conditions. 

These groups have issued a public advisory to caution diabetes patients and their families who may be "vulnerable to exploitation," the statement said. 

"Other types involve claims using anecdotes advertised and endorsed by well-known personalities who have no scientific credibility to make such claim, except for his or her limited experience. The public needs protection from this unethical use of still unproven therapy which may have unknown and unquantified harmful effects. For PCP, exposing our patients to these unknown risks is ethically unacceptable," Dr. Priscilla Caguioa, PCP President, said in the same 

Post has attachment
Diabetes- can stem cells help?' is a free, public event that will be held on Monday, 4 November 2013 from 19:00- 20:30 at The Ruin located within the Berlin Museum of Medical History, Charité. Diabetes and stem cell researchers from around Europe will assemble for a REDDSTAR plenary meeting hosted by Charité in Berlin on November 5 and 6th.  In conjunction with the scientific meeting, the public event will take place.  REDDSTAR, Repair of Diabetic Damage by Stromal Cell Administration involves ten partners from academia, industry and hospitals and runs for three years with funding from the European Commission. 

Speakers include Professor Doctor Hans- Dieter Volk, Director of the Berlin Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapy (BCRT), Professor Doctor Carsten Tschoepe of Charité and Mrs Michaela Berger, Board member for DiabetesDE.  The event will be moderated by Katharina Simons of the EU project CommHERE (www.CommHERE.eu).

Fifty million patients with diabetes mellitus in the EU are using prescription drugs to control their blood glucose levels. Poor control of blood glucose levels leads to a number of diabetic complications, including: nephropathy, retinopathy, cardiomyopathy, neuropathy, impaired bone repair and wound ulceration. At present, there are few therapeutic options available to control initiation and progression of diabetic complications and they continue to present challenging disease management issues for clinicians.  What is research doing to address this challenge?

Source: http://www.reddstar.eu/reddstar-public-event-in-berlin/

Post has attachment
Pancreas Stem Cell Discovery May Lead to New Diabetes Treatments
Stem cells in the adult pancreas have been identified that can be turned into insulin producing cells, a finding that means people with type 1 diabetes might one day be able to regenerate their own insulin-producing cells.
Share This:



114
The discovery was made by scientists from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute and provides further evidence that stem cells don't only occur in the embryo.
The ability to produce the hormone insulin is crucial for controlling blood sugar (glucose) levels. In people with type 1 diabetes the body's immune system destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas, leading to a potentially fatal elevation of blood glucose levels.
People with type 1 diabetes rely on multiple daily injections of insulin, or an insulin infusion pump, to control their blood glucose, but control is not perfect and they are at risk of serious long-term health complications.

Post has attachment
Stem cell therapy for diabetes has not yet been proven effective and is still in its early experimental stages, warned the Philippine Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism (PSEM), a group of diabetes specialists under the Philippine College of Physicians (PCP).
 
Stem cell therapy is, at present, an experimental treatment for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and should not be used as standard treatment yet, according to the PSEM.
 
In a statement released on August 18, the PSEM said that stem cell therapy is still unproven to normalize blood sugars, nor at least decrease the necessary number of anti-diabetic medications.
 
"We therefore, urge the public to refrain from availing of stem cells for the therapy of diabetes," the statement said.
 
To date, there is no known cure for diabetes mellitus.
 
"Ang diabetes, pag meron ka, naco-control lang. Hindi siya parang sipon na nacu-cure," said former PSEM president Dr. Leilani B. Mercado-Asis.
 
PSEM president Dr. Cecilia A. Jimeno said that the PSEM is not against stem cell therapy per se, but is pushing for the strong regulation that FDA is trying to establish.
 
"Stem cells provides medical practitioners an innovative approach to restore health and offers the patients alternative choices. However, the promise of stem cell therapy must be backed by science- and evidence-based medicine, before it can be part of the standard health care. Any clinical use of stem cell products outside of the FDA-approved indications is illegal," Jimeno said in a separate press release.
 
Early stages of research
 
As of October 22, there are 94 registered studies worldwide of stem cell therapy for treating diabetes milletus.
 
Most of those registered studies are in either Phase 1 or 2 trials: testing on petri dishes and on animals, respectively, Asis said.
 
In the Philippines, there are only two registered studies that were last updated way back in 2008: one for Type 1 and another for Type 2 diabetes, both in still Phases 1 and 2. The status of these studies remain unknown since the results have not been published.
 
Stem cell therapy, like any other drug or treatment in the market, must go through rigorous screening and testing processes before being released to the market.
 
"Kulang ang lima, sampung taon bago ma-perfect ang stem cell therapy (para maging) isa siyang regular na maipapayo sa mga pasyente," said Dr. Gabriel Jasul Jr., clinical associate professor of the UP College of Medicine and past president of PSEM.
 
It will take about ten to 20 years of screening and testing and at least 5,000 human test subjects before it is made a standard treatment, he said.
 
Wait while more posts are being loaded