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Brett Cannon
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Nothing but snark
Nothing but snark

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Jython 2.7.1 final released!
On behalf of the Jython development team, I'm pleased to announce
that the final release of Jython 2.7.1 is available! We thought 2 017-0 7 -0 1 was a perfect time to release version 2.7.1 :) This is a bugfix release. Bug fixes include improvements in ssl ...

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My blog post on how I came to the overall API design for gidgethub and how I think we might want to structure async-supporting libraries going forward in Python.

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From Python's perspective of the analysis, we are trending to continue to gain users overall. The analysis also suggests Go is Python's biggest usurper of Python users. Based on the trend a couple years ago of people going from Python 2 to Go, I'm not surprised with that result. However, with more people happy with Python 3 and the introduction of async, I don't expect any trend of Python programmers switching to Go to stick long-term.
This is a slightly amusing, but interesting, bit of data analysis. Bernhardsson searched for articles of the form "Why our team moved from [programming language] to [other programming language]," to get a picture of trends. He ended up with the big matrix shown below.

Now, if you view the frequency of these articles as indicating the probability with which people actually move from one to the other, you end up with a big matrix of transition probabilities. And if you have a matrix of transition probabilities, you can compute the equilibrium distribution: in this case, what programming languages people end up using after a long time. (That assumes that the probability distributions stay fixed for long enough to reach equilibrium, but interestingly, it doesn't depend on what distribution of languages you started out with.)

In case you're wondering, the present future of programming languages is: 16.4% Go, 14.3% C, 13.2% Java, 11.5% C++, and 9.5% Python. This actually doesn't entirely surprise me: C and C++ continue to be the backbones of infrastructure and embedded systems; Java and Python remain the "generic default languages," and every other language people use for development tends to bounce back and forth between that and those standards; and people seem to be transitioning to Go a lot more than they transition away from it.

Of course, this assumes that the sort of things which people generate articles about is actually indicative of real life, which probably grossly overrepresents certain kinds of team.
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