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Brookhaven National Laboratory
Research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences.
Research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences.
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We’re kicking things into high gear at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Revving up for our next physics run, Brookhaven technician Mike Myers checks components of the stochastic cooling “kickers,” which generate electric fields to nudge ions in RHIC’s gold beams back into tightly packed bunches so they collide within our detectors as close to head-on as possible. This system of squeezing and cooling beams increases the rate of collisions between ions and improves the amount of data coming out of RHIC.
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The superconducting magnets of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are cooling once more, preparing to guide proton beams into collision. 

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"Understanding change at the top of the world so we’ll know what is going to happen later"

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Climate science gets a boost from a cargo ship – an array of high-tech instruments will ride along on repeated voyages between Los Angeles and Hawaii, collecting unparalleled environmental data for an entire year.

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Brookhaven's x-ray vision helped hunt for flaws in a new NASA telescope. Next step? Studying black holes, supernovae, and other cosmic phenomena in greater detail than ever before.

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Data collected at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland has culminated in the discovery of a new particle that is about 135 times heavier than a proton. But is it really the Higgs particle predicted by the theory that explains the origin of the mass of most elementary particles in the universe? The discovery and its possible identity is discussed in this video by Sally Dawson and Howard Gordon, two Brookhaven Lab physicist with deep roots in the hunt for the Higgs.

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Check out this video about the incredible breakthroughs in nuclear physics over the past decade and the exciting discoveries on the horizon. Two of our RHIC physicists talk about simulating the Big Bang and Brookhaven's role in the future of physics. 

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Atom-smashers keep strange hours - our physicists pull all-nighters at Brookhaven's collider, sipping coffee and sifting through subatomic debris.

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Nuclear physicists would like to build a new machine: an electron-ion collider designed to shine a very bright "light" on both protons and heavy ions to reveal their inner secrets.
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