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Brian Baier
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Have I got an idea for a cooperative set collection game!
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Thomas Girard's profile photoKevin Gallagher's profile photoPaul VanMetre's profile photo64 Ounce Games's profile photo
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It comes with expansions!
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I like it! LOL 
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For the elderly space opera fan.
 
These are the chairs you're looking for. R2 & Stormtrooper hard-carved Adirondack chairs: http://j.mp/18By6S3
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Unexpected results: Curious whether comments on politics or religion in some of my facebook posts would have caused people to "unfriend" me, I began noting monthly numbers of "friends" on my account. Not only did my numbers never drop between any months, I've actually gained 80 friends between August 2012 and now. Fascinating. And they say fb is dying out.
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Brian Baier

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This is a sad fate for all involved. I wonder what portent this will be for the "kickstarter" model, and whether new rules will develop to protect the creators and patrons, alike.
 
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/forkingpath/the-doom-that-came-to-atlantic-city/posts/548030

Let's review:

• If you have one, don't quit your job to fulfill a kickstarter campaign. The time and financial costs always turn out higher than you project, and you need that other source of income to make sure you stay afloat — and can (if you didn't start with money in your company coffers) personally float yourself a loan for overruns.

• Don't, y'know, move or make any life decision based on the funding of a Kickstarter campaign. This has to fit into your already available time-space and current location.

• Put yourself and your partners through whatever emotional stress-test you can in advance of running the thing. There's no sure riftmaker like success, and few pressurecookers like a Kickstarter campaign; add to that the obligation to and expectations of your backers after you've funded and you'll find yourself at a high-stress breaking point all the damn time (believe me).

• Unless you've got some rock solid experience personally implementing and delivering on a project at any scale under time and budgetary pressure, do NOT make a Kickstarter your first time out. It's all of that plus additional stressors unique to a crowdfunding campaign. Take incremental steps: not giant leaps. Kickstarter doesn't patch over any of that for you.

• That means you need to build experience to do your dream project. For 99% of folks who make things, that's how you have to do it. Yes, there's a loud 1% of folks who got it right the first time. They're the exceptions. The rest of us have to get there by increments. Dream big, yes, but also dream small. Make your first thing a small thing. Make your next thing a slightly larger thing. And so forth.

Evil Hat spent 6 years working on being a successful RPG publisher before trying to branch into board games. Our Race to Adventure Kickstarter was a success. We funded to the level we asked for. Getting there meant a bunch of swag and shipping that we maybe shouldn't have taken on. All told it meant we got to product launch about $20,000 in the red with the expenses that went beyond the funds covered by what was funded.

We knew we would probably see overruns. We planned for it. That $20,000 came out of funds we already had prior to the project. After several months of sales following the game's release in April, we've cut that number in half. We're confident we'll eventually break even on the game—it'll just take time. Time we can afford.

This is not an atypical Kickstarter boardgame scenario.

Be ready for it.
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Jeremy Williams's profile photoBrian Baier's profile photoJacob Kopczynski's profile photoChris Lewis's profile photo
6 comments
 
Everything was done to better work on the game, so I don't see it going anywhere.
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Pricing my collectible playing cards and came across a basic land worth $40 on the low end. Anyone care to guess what it is?
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My set collection card game just today has swung toward a point management card game.

How much has a game of yours shifted mechanics during development?
What's the most drastic alteration of that sort you've felt compelled to make?
Was it difficult to abandon one rule for another?
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Cullam Bruce-Lockhart's profile photoPhil Hatfield's profile photoBrian Baier's profile photoHappyWulf Wulf's profile photo
5 comments
 
Did you ever play MagiNation? The core game mechanics was all about generating mana with your creature's various abilities, and then sacrificing the mana on your creatures to kill your opponent's creatures.
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Have him in circles
110 people
Rachel Lee's profile photo
Darin Kerr's profile photo
Erica Sodeyama's profile photo
Katie Holman's profile photo
Matthew Nelson's profile photo
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Archival specialist, Photographer, Lover of Table Top Games, Time Travel, and Lazer Tag.
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The internet is both scary and wonderful and I want to tell everything and nothing.
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[Closed in 2011 due to poor business, sadly.] By far, the most authentic Mexican restaurant in Grand Forks. You'll find Mi Mexico referenced favorably in reviews for other Grand Forks establishments that claim a Mexican menu. Located in the old Hardee's building on the corner of Demers and Washington, you'll find a good variety of dishes in generous helpings at reasonable prices. Also a plus is the colorful and artistic decor. After several visits I found the staff competent and friendly, except for one bad experience where a server didn't communicate well and actually seemed to forget about us, the food arriving much later than that of people seated after us. If you want Mexican food that isn't Midwest-Mex or fast food, it's the best place in town.
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Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Unfortunately, the Saturday night bands and the Tuesday night Cay Jams are now a thing of the past, but they still do Thursday karaoke, if I'm not mistaken. The menu is still an attraction, as well as the dozen or so beers on tap. Patronage ranges between after-work crowd, students, and hippies. Not sure what's going to come of the place after Valley Dairy moves to it's new location out on 47th and Washington.
Public - 6 years ago
reviewed 6 years ago
2 reviews
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