Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Irina Souiki
7,590 followers -
I dream in colour.
I dream in colour.

7,590 followers
About
Irina's posts

Post has attachment
WTF! This is the most twisted thing I've seen this year (graphic content).

Post has shared content
So cool!
Very cool multiple exposure shot of takeoffs at Hannover Airport by Ho-Yeol Ryu.
Photo

Post has shared content
I love numbers and old license plates, especially in black and white. This shot by +Richard Siggins for this week's #TuesDecay is like an old song with two verses and a chorus, inviting the viewer to hum along T99-130, 324-02, T104-256. The rusty artefacts are instruments introduced along the way, one can only imagine the sounds they make. All of them resonating quietly in a nicely padded recording room made of solid wood. It's wonderful. Have you ever made a camera sing? Richard's got the secret.

I, for one, prefer to listen. This is my last curation for today for +Ian Ference's #TuesDecay and all I can say is that pictures like these filled my head with music all day long. Sha la la la la. Thank you!!

Please leave your comments on the original post.

Post has shared content
I don't mind cliches at all when the result is rather outstanding. However, I need to be careful here because the composition in this picture feels just a bit too well choreographed. Technically it is excellent, the contrast is right where it's pleasant to the eye and the windows are perfectly exposed (is this HDR?), but in the end, I am left wondering if the photographer didn't arrange the furniture in order to obtain the most dramatic effect. I hope +Ina Gatzmaga will not take this personally because I am not criticizing whatever decision she made while taking this photo. I am of the opinion that some modifications can be made in order to fulfil one's vision and I support this fully as long as it doesn't mean further destruction. Who are we to say that a couch cannot be placed perfectly in the middle if that's what tickles our lens? Without historic evidence, who are we to say that this couch wasn't there in first place? (I know where my love seat is in my living room!). In the end, it just doesn't matter, we should appreciate the result and learn from it. Haters can just stick with mayhem.

Thank you +Ina Gatzmaga for your submission to this week's #TuesDecay and to +Ian Ference for letting me curate.

Please leave your comments in the original post. Don't be a troll, ok?

Post has shared content
This picture was taken in a prison? Oh boy, this doesn't bring up warm and fuzzy thoughts but rather a glacial shiver down my spine. I appreciate that the photographer, +Monica Heinakroon, who submitted this photo to +Ian Ference's #TuesDecay, left the main light source out of the frame (the window I suppose), thus allowing for more subdued colors and contrast, and chose the lamp to be the main focus of the image. How fitting! In your face!! Or in this case, on other body parts. I can only imagine what that machinery could do to you, if it wasn't for keeping you alive. Great composition with plenty of stories to tell.

Please leave your comments on the original post.
I am happy to be curating this week's awesome collection of photos like this one!
#TuesDecay
Patarei Prison Museum, Tallinn, Estonia
Photo

Post has shared content
Come on, confess, you too, want to pick up that phone and listen. Touch the dial, feel the resistance at the end of each rotation and the curvy receiver in the palm of your hand. This picture makes me really excited because I was one of the lucky ones to have grown up with a rotary telephone, so I can imagine, even better, remember what it feels like. This one is looking mighty proud and calls for being the center of attention, just as +Jean-Claude Dahn chose to capture it in this photo submitted to +Ian Ference's #TuesDecay. Although by my time rotary phones were sitting on a table instead of hanging on a wall, I suppose their concept lasted a long time because I know quite a few folks who had a phone hanging on the kitchen wall with a 20 feet chord so you can talk while you cook. Alright, enough with the retro talk, it makes me look like I'm decaying too.
Back to the picture - am I the only one who thinks that the wall paper matches the phone just perfectly? Look at those hieroglyphs, they look like morse code. Just in case you want that extra privacy, you know. Also, it must have been tough to go all the way up the stairs to answer the phone. Just follow the wall paper, up and down it goes. ;-)

+Jean-Claude Dahn, you made this phone justice. Thank you for sharing it with us (psst, go look at his other photos too!).

Please leave your comments on the original post.
impression from the maison Dr R.
for #tuesdecay by +Ian Ference
#urbex #urbanexploration
Photo

Post has shared content
You want the recipe for a perfect "abandoned" shot? Look no further, this one has all the ingredients in it. No matter how many pictures you see with one or more of the following : corridor with a light source at the end of it, peeling paint, window or door, chair, stairs and nature peeking (or pouring) in, they never get old. Or maybe they do, what do I know, I am guilty of all the above myself. It may be only perfect to me, but you have to agree, this is one sexy display of abandonment. Use monochrome tones for added drama and a nice contrast without blown out highlights and you could even use this picture in a photography class. Not only it's technically sound, but you could also write a thousand stories just by looking at it. Was that chair for someone who left the house for good, or someone who can never go out? Or someone who likes to read a good book while listening to the sounds of nature thanks to just a crack in the door? We'll never know, but we're left admiring the result thanks to +Matthew Godycki's submission to this week's #TuesDecay, usually curated by +Ian Ference, today guest curated by me.

Thanks for leaving your comments on the original post.
Apologies to those of you who have already seen this in my stream recently, but I wanted to also share this for #TuesDecay curated by +Ian Ference.
Photo

Post has shared content
Oh my - such a great capture. Life is precious in general but life transcending rust is downright special. +Kiki Nelson's submission to this week's #TuesDecay by +Ian Ference is making a statement, that you shall never give up. As cheesy as it may sound, this is a perfect display of hope and fight for survival. Those hairy lifelines may look microscopic, but don't underestimate them, snow and all, they've decided to make it to spring. Even more, they are the epitome of spring. Look at that blanket of moss, it married the rust quite nicely and it's sprouting those grass babies left and right. The rusty vessel should be proud, while it dies slowly, a new life emerges on its grounds. Kiki was there to notice despite the cold, the snow and the dangers of walking around sharp and rusty metal parts. You and those tiny little plants are showing us what courage means.

Please leave your comments on the original post.
So here's my second for #Tuesdecay - I've been playing along every week since this thing was born in like September or October of last year. Sometimes, it's just hard to remember and keep it all straight in my head, so I picked Old Favorites today. If they are reposts, you'll just have to forgive me. <3 (especially you, +Ian Ference )


cour·age   [kur-ij, kuhr-]
noun
1.the quality of mind or spirit that enables one to face difficulty, danger, pain, etc., without fear; bravery.

2.(Obsolete) the heart as the source of emotion.

Portland, OR
Photo

Post has shared content
I am not an expert in Steel Factories, but this is a cool looking one. I am like a kid in a candy store. In this picture submitted to +Ian Ference's #TuesDecay by +Jorge Schramm, I don't know what I like better - the row of giant steel robots (ovens? cooling machinery?), the mustard-lime window panes, the dusty catwalks that seem to be made out of mesh or the gaping hole that cries "mind your step". The contrast between the warm, fragile state of things on the right and the cold, stillness of the heavy metal (no pun intended) on the left creates a great balance between elements. My eyes are drawn to all these details, like the thin elongated hole that looks like a neon light at the top and that flashy green item beside the door. What is it, a sign, an empty can of paint? I want to know more. That's what make a great photograph, one that leaves you with more questions than answers and the urge of buying a magnifying glass. Well captured, Jorge!

Please leave your comments in the original post.

Post has shared content
I've been once to San Francisco Bay, but all I remember are the sea lions and the greasy Bubba Gump shrimps. See, I don't remember any ships. This picture from +Scott Gust for +Ian Ference's #TuesDecay brings me back there and gives me a lesson in detail. Pay attention, it says. If one doesn't know what an anchor looks like, we get the point, it's heavy, lies underwater, it must be decaying and it needs two chains to be pulled out. What I love most about this photo is that it's taken just above the water, leaving us guessing both its ends. Water comes up, it wets the chain, water goes down, the chain dries. With each movement of the tide, more rust is added on and more rust is washed away. It's quite poetic. Besides, the shiny rust vs the dry rust could make an entire visual essay. I know I'm inspired.
Please leave comments on the original post.
Wait while more posts are being loaded