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Barry Blanchard
2,031,633 followers -
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2,031,633 followers
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I'm sitting here reflection on all the friends I met thought Google+, and I am actually quite sad over Googles decision to kill it.

I was just thinking that I needed to start posting here again. :(
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I know a place.....

Four-Mile Beach, Santa Cruz, CA.

Enjoy your day, Google+
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I am always amazed with what nature has to offer, and often enjoy taking a deeper look into just how organisms persevere over the years, if not eons.

Where Traci and I live, we can drive 15-20 minutes and stand in front of a tree that's survived for over 2,000 years. Sequoia sempervirens, (commonly called Redwood) weighs in as one of the oldest (and largest) living items on our planet. An "average" size redwood comes in at over 200 feet, but we have some of the older giants still thriving along a 500 mile strip along Californias west coast.

So what does it take to feed such a behemoth? Lots of water, and a good chunk of that comes from our coastal fog.

"The only way we can pump water to as great a height as the top of a redwood tree is to use multiple booster pumps at different levels. So how can the tree do it? There is a constant upward flow of water from the roots to the topmost part of the tree. Scientists have discovered that water molecules interact with the sides of the capillary tubes, that's the plumbing that carries the water and nutrients up into the tree. This interaction creates a bond which "drags" the water column up with it. At the same time the water evaporating from the leaf creates a vacuum which pulls the water up as well. At some point the attraction and the tree's "suction" are not strong enough to maintain this column of water with the result that the tree has reached its maximum height.

Scientists and researchers estimate that a mature tree requires hundreds of gallons of water per day, and for this reason the roots need an ample supply of water. Redwood trees thrive in the river bottoms where they obviously have access to lots of ground water. But these giant trees also make their own rain, out of fog! The moisture in the air condenses between the leaves and eventually drips down to the root zone. It is believed that one of the reasons redwood trees have adapted to their great height is because the higher the tree, the more moisture it can provide for itself. And the reason they thrive along Northern California's Pacific Coast is because this area often gets a daily fog".

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3/14/18
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Well it's been so long since I've been on Google+, I had to learn it again!

Lets start right here. +DJI and +Hasselblad .


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You got me last time, too. Scott Creek (North of Davenport, CA) has always been a favorite location for me to shoot at.

This time I am in the air with the Fuji GFX and 23mm lens under Dji's M600 Pro. The dynamic range in this medium format setup just boggles my mind.

More to come, I promise.

#fujifilmx_us
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Its been awhile, but I have a good excuse. I've been a very busy boy.

Here's a quick snap from the desert south of Las Vegas. I'm here with my wife for http://www.dji.com at www.nabshow.com.

#dji #inspire2
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Old Davenport Pier structure getting a new life.

+DJI Inspire 2 | X5S Camera | Olympus 25mm lens | Formatt-Hitech ND.
0.6 sec at ƒ / 5.0 ISO 100

The Swing © +Barry Blanchard

#djicreator #dji #djiinspire2
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Highway 1, North of Scott Creek in Central California.

DJI Inspire 2 / X5S / Olympus 25mm / .6 GND

The Edge © +Barry Blanchard
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