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Gary Tomlinson
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A Crisis of Trust

“You don’t have to look far to realize that, as a global society, we have a crisis of trust on our hands.” Consider these recent newspaper headlines:

“Employees’ New Motto: Trust No One!”
“Companies Urged to Rebuild Trust”
“Both Sides Betray the Others’ Trust”
“20 NYSE Traders Indicted”

Now think about Enron, Bernie Madoff and a slew of front-page headlines in both the national news and your own local news. In recent polls only “22% of those surveyed tend to trust the media, only 8% trust political parties, only 27% trust the government and only 12% trust big companies. On the organizational level, research shows that only 51% of employees have trust and confidence in senior management. Only 36% of employees believe their leaders act with honesty and integrity. Over the past twelve months, 76% of employees have observed illegal or unethical conduct on the job – conduct which, if exposed, would seriously violate the public trust.”

The number one reason people leave their jobs is a bad relationship with their boss.

One out of every two marriages ends in divorce.

“Most of us tend to think about trust in terms of character – of being a good or sincere person or of having ethics or integrity. And character is absolutely foundational and essential.” In his book The Speed of Trust, Stephen R. Covey says “that trust is a function of two things: character and competence. Character includes your integrity, your motive, and your intent with people. Competence includes your capabilities, your skills, your results, and your track record. And both are vital. Both are absolutely necessary. From the family room to the boardroom, you can look at any leadership failure, and it’s always a failure of one or the other.”

The wisdom in this blog entry comes from the book The Speed of Trust by Dr. Stephen R. Covey. To see Gary’s book synopsis on The Speed of Trust: http://www.gary-tomlinson.com/media/Synopsis_-_Speed_of_Trust.pdf

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Hurdles to Successful Execution Management #7

Lack of courage and commitment on the part of the senior executive.

Execution management systems are not for the faint of heart. They require a senior leader that understands that he or she is the one person who has the ultimate accountability for the success of the enterprise. First, he or she must be strong enough to make the decision to move forward and, once made, must have the strength to carry through with it.

This begins even before you get started. As a senior leader, it’s usually a terrific idea to empower your team, to involve them as much as you can in the decisions that you make. However, there are some decisions that you can’t make by going to the team and discussing them. The decision to go forward with implementing an execution management system is one of them.

Here’s the reason why. If you run it by your leadership team we can pretty much guarantee there will be one or more of your team members who have an emotional reaction to it. They’ll have just enough insecurity about this amount of visibility and accountability to try to talk you out of it. They’ll say something that sounds logical and intelligent, like, “We do alright.” “We’ve tried these kinds of consulting interventions before and they don’t stick.” “We’ll just focus on it more ourselves.” Or, “Don’t we have enough to do without getting into another initiative that is supposed to improve performance but only makes it worse because it is one more thing to do? I don’t know about anybody else, but I, for one, don’t have the time for this.”

The reality is that they are being driven by one or more of the other six hurdles. If you are aware that you’re going to disturb the sleeping dragon, the status quo, and that there are some decisions you will need to make that you do not “run by your team” first, you will have the courage and the commitment to make the decision to move forward and then figure out how to get your team on board.

This education comes from an article co-written by Miles Kierson and Gary Tomlinson.
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Art of Telling – Ineffective Traits to Avoid

The question of effective traits of speakers is one I ask the audience during every one of my Art of Telling presentations. I also ask them to think of someone they’ve heard speak that they didn’t really enjoy listening to. Then I ask them to tell me the traits the speaker exhibited that they didn’t like or care for. Over the years I’ve heard thousands of responses to this question. What’s amazing is their answers are always the same. Here’s what they tell me:

• They ramble; they’re not well-organized.

• They’re uninformed on their topic.

• They lack preparation.

• They speak in monotone; they don’t use their voices well.

• They show no energy or passion.

• They use too many “fillers” (non-words).

• They exhibit poor eye contact.

• They pace or wander of fidget.

• They use profanity or questionable humor.

• They are poor storytellers.

The next time you’re getting ready to make a presentation, whether to an audience of 1, 5 or 500 hundred, think about these ineffective traits that listeners don’t like to see or hear. Make sure to avoid those traits. Be well prepared. Have a passion for your message. Make good eye contact. Never use questionable humor or profanity. Connect with your listener. And remember that presentations should be built on the listener’s future rather than the presenter’s past. “Don’t tell me about your grass seed, tell me about my lawn.”
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After years of consulting to senior executives and upper level managers on execution management systems, we have concluded...there is extraordinary resistance from individuals and organizations to addressing and getting better at execution. Is your organization one of those?
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