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Bryan Jones
Attended University of Texas @ Austin
Lives in Dalian, China
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Bryan Jones

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Big Bang Theory falls afoul in China

The Chinese internet is abuzz after some American TV shows have apparently been axed (since yesterday) by a stricter content policy by the government. The Big Bang Theory, The Good Wife, The Practice and NCIS are four of the shows I've seen mentioned so far. Numerous video websites now show “due to [government] policy reasons, this video is unable to be viewed.”

I'm a little surprised House of Cards, which is hugely popular over here, hasn't been axed, too. Especially the second season which has a fairly negative Chinese presence.

The second photo is a still from a Chinese TV series showing a Chinese kungfu master ripping a Japanese soldier in half with his bare hands. Every day, pretty much all day, you can watch the Japanese devils getting their due at the hands of avenging Chinese.

Following are some of the comments I've run into on the internet...

I suggest they just broadcast Japanese devils being ripped in half with bare hands epics everyday!

What content is in The Big Bang Theory? Is it very yellow, very violent? If it isn’t, then why take it down? Learning from North Korea?

In 1987, China’s first email marked China’s entry into the Internet Age, and the content of that email was “Across the Great Wall we can reach every corner in the world. (越过长城,走向世界)”. Just how much of a joke that looks today.

Even if all foreign shows are taken down, I still won’t watch [domestic] brainwashing TV shows and garbage TV shows!

Are we only allowed to watch various ridiculous TV shows about abusing Little Japan?

I thank the government and thank the Party! For truly going through a lot of trouble for the people!

Even The Big Bang Theory…are you serious?

Sheldon sometimes mentions China, and does so in ridicule or as a joke. If this were to come from the mouths of politicians, then I think I would not be comfortable hearing it. But this is from the mouth of Sheldon, whose emotional quotient is 0. Americans making fun of you means China is constantly expanding its influence in America. This is the mentality of amusement of Americans, and China instead pettily refuses to be made fun of. May I ask, where is the self-confidence and charisma of China as a large country/major power? I don’t see it. I’m very disappointed.

BTW, one of the comments asked if The Big Bang Theory is very yellow. What we (used to) call blue movies in the West are called huang pian, or yellow movies in China...because, if you watch yellow movies, then you're seeing a lot of yellow skin.
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Interesting, +Colin Lee. I wonder if he likes it because the character Kevin Spacey plays is rather amoral.
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China Vagina Monologues

The Gender Activism Club at the Beijing Foreign Studies University has been actively, ah, prodding local vaginas to speak up...
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young  women!!, idk if you've heard it but there's a joke in the back of my my mind (or somewhere) that alludes to girls having discovered a new toy , that they wanna play with  and would like to share ,but aren't quite sure of the rules,
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I See You!

Here's an album of paintings by Chinese artist Guo Jin. This series has a particular focus on children. Some people interpret these as an expression, maybe even a juxtaposition, of youth and China's relatively youthful entrance into the global scheme of things. I don't know. Just telling you what I hear.

Personally, while I do enjoy the tones and textures of his work. And the expressive nature of them, I find many of them rather eery and unsettling...as if they are some adolescent character leaping out of the page of a Stephen King tome. No?

Born in Chengdu, Sichuan in 1964, Guo Jin graduated from the Sichuan Academy of Fine Arts in 1990 and is now a professor there.

#chineseart  
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We miss you +Bryan Jones !
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People are People
Depeche Mode (circa 1984)

People are people
So why should it be
You and I should get
Along so awfully
People are people
So why should it be
You and I should get
Along so awfully

So we're different colors
And we're different creeds
And different people have different needs
It's obvious you hate me
Though I've done nothing wrong
I've never even met you so what could I have done

I can't understand
What makes a man
Hate another man
Help me understand

People are people...

Help me understand
Help me understand

Now you're punching
And you're kicking
And you're shouting at me
I'm relying on your common decency
So far it hasn't surfaced
But I'm sure it exists
It just takes a while to travel
From your head to your fists

I can't understand
What makes a man
Hate another man
Help me understand

My first born, +Brad Jones, has apparently been paying attention to my recent People are People thread and thoughtfully provided the lyrics and the link in a comment on one of my posts. Definitely worth passing along. Kind of gives one a warm, gooey feeling when your child knows how to keep things in perspective. Thanks, guy!
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Merry xmas my friend :))
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What's politics got to do with it?

My first post ever on a social network was last August when I joined G+. And it was my political compass...then. For reasons unknown to me, my good friend, +barqzr davi, recently canoed all the way down through the whitewaters of my stream until he found that me of yesteryear.

I urged him to do his own political compass test, which he did and then shared with me. So, out of mild curiosity, I took the test again (http://politicalcompass.org/) just to see if my political bent has changed in less than one year.

Turns out I'm bent more to the left and more libertarian than before. (Previously, I was roughly two squares to the east and one to the north.) If I lean any more to the left, I'll fall off the frickin' planet.

What's your bent?

Please +mention me if you share your particular bent, so that I'll be sure to see it!
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lol when i was talking about anarchy and stuff i meant bottom right. since having a kid im bottom, slightly left
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People are people

To stand out in a crowd in China is not a good thing. Being unconventional is to defy tradition and tradition is the cornerstone of Chinese harmony.

“My life is unconventional, licentious...like a dog. When I sing, it is to sing my own life."

No matter where they come from, people are people.
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People are people

Lu Yongming, 17 years old, is just one of literally millions of a younger generation of Chinese who are fleeing the country and flocking to the cities in search of a better life.

“I work as an apprentice in an auto repair shop. Being an apprentice is very hard. Sometimes I even have to work outside when it rains and snows. In this city, I have a 'white collar' big sister, who works in a clean and bright office building. She often buys things for me when she comes to see me. To see my big sister being so refined, while I am covered from head to toe in grease, my buddies often joke about me being a 'black collar.' I don’t like farming, so black collar is still better than 'mud collar.' The rural life, in one word, boring; in two words, very boring."

No matter where you come from...people are people.
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YEP i agree it gets one outta their comfort zone , hell even making city kids do a year in a rural setting changes them , makes them more accepting, but as you say immersion in a foreign culture is experience that cannot but enrich appreciation of manifest humanity and temper incestuous nationalistic prejudices
People are people regardless :))
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Bryan Jones

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Battling Myopia

Students at a primary school in Wuhan (Hubei province) returned to school after the winter holiday and found a little extra added to their desks. School officials say the bars will help the students form better reading habits and reduce near-sightedness. (Numbers vary, but I've seen reports citing as high as 80% of high school graduates suffering from myopia.)

BTW, this particular class is comprised of "left-behind" children whose parents are migrant workers in far-flung corners of China.
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Analyst...at your service

I'm snagging a tip from +Marc Jansen today. Instead of posting more Chinese art, or some quirky Sino-related tidbit, I found something interesting three degrees removed from me in my stream. And appropriated it. You may, or may not, find it interesting, too.

This post resonated with me because I'm newly returned to G+ after an almost one year hiatus. I had contemplated abandoning the Google social ship altogether, but one aspect of being an expatriate (eight years now) drew me back onboard.

Isolation...

My wife jokes with me at times that I'm more yellow than she is...meaning more Chinese than her. And I have assimilated a great deal. I know, I understand a lot more about Chinese culture and Chinese people, and even the language, than I did before I came here. However long I live here though, I simply live within the culture, not in it. I'm not Chinese and never will be, even if they were interested in expanding their population via immigration/naturalization.

I do have Chinese friends, yet the reality is that these relationships don't provide the same scope, the depth and breadth friendship requires so that you feel connected to another human being. As much as I enjoy my life here, I need that kind of connection. And interaction.

I need that Na'vi, I see you. I get you. I know where you're coming from. Which I can tell you from a great deal of experience doesn't grow on the tea bushes here in China. And it's not in the grains of sand on the beach 500 meters from my door.

But it just might be in the grains of sand in this virtual sandbox. It was here before...before I abandoned ship, before I needed to deal with the barnacles dragging my life down into murky water. I've only been back a few days but it's still here.

You are still here. So thank you.

I'm still evaluating how to get the most out of my time online. Which is why the original post about leadORS profiles, or personalities, caught my attention. And why I followed up by taking the quick profile indicator.

It says I'm an Analyst. Closed. Selective. Supportive.

Maybe this post even supports that diagnosis. I don't know. You tell me. But I do know that it's one more data point to help me analyze how to maximize my online time so I can See You.
_____________________________________________________________

You can find +martin shervington's OP here: http://goo.gl/MsqZT
And the leadORS short questionnaire here: http://www.leadors.co

Note: you do have to register with leadORS in order to take the questionnaire, but I didn't personally find that too threatening.

Found via +Marcelo Almeida via +Max Huijgen 
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i liked the colors in mine http://is.gd/G2zifD
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Bend...but don't break

This painting by Chinese artist Guo Jin pretty much sums it up. I haven't been active on G+ for about a year now. I got bent. But didn't break. Life goes on.

I may not be as active as before, but I'll be around...looking to reconnect with old friends and maybe discovering and making new ones.
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i just like to see fanatics react when i make fun of their gods , nothing malevolent
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People are people
From fields of rice…to fields of concrete

Under the Gaoqiao overpass of Changsha, capital city of the Hunan province, 13 year old Yang Qing lies on a mat, asleep. Over the past few days, he has been suffering from an unrelenting high fever. His mother depends on shining other people’s shoes to make a living. Knowing it is very expensive to go to the hospital, he sleeps in the cool shadow of the overpass.

Shoeshine ladies are about as ubiquitous as sidewalk snack vendors in most of China, though, for reasons unknown to me, Dalian has far fewer of both. When I first came to China seven years ago, a shoeshine cost yi kuai qian, little more than a dime at yesteryear's exchange rate. Today, a shoeshine will set you back liang kuai qian (2RMB), or a little more than 30 cents. As well, bear in mind that there is no tipping in China for any kind of service.

I'd always shined my own shoes back in the states, but I gave this a try a few times simply as part of my initial cross-cultural experience. Although it was invariably provided with a warm smile and giggles at being so near a laowai, I always walked away vaguely uneasy. I imagine it's been well over five years since I last sat down in front of a shoeshine lady.

After I saw this photo and read the background, I found myself, again, feeling uneasy. By way of a perhaps misplaced sense of respect, have I rather chosen to deprive some caring, honest and hard-working mother the ability to provide for her child?

You tell me...

No matter where we come from...people are people.
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it's a tough scenario, and can be seen many times over in many parts of the world. From shoe shining to selling nik naks and washing car windows. The hardest part for these women is breaking the cycle - if they could give their children a decent education, they have a chance at a better future. That's why I will always be in favour of education programs and NGOs who focus on providing valuable skills to the community.
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People are people

Zhong Rujiu holds her older sister, Zhong Ruqin, in the ward of a Beijing hospital. Zhong Rujiu said that her big sister used to hold her warmly like this when she was little. In September of 2010, the Zhong family had a conflict with relocation and demolition personnel about being forced out of their home. Zhong Rujiu's sister, mother and uncle poured gasoline on themselves and set themselves on fire to protest the relocation.

No matter where they come from, people are people
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+Brad Jones That's frickin' eerie. I had a dream about Depeche Mode and this song last night.
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People
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Work
Occupation
Straddling two cultures...an American in China since 2005
Employment
  • Cultural Ambassador, 2005 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Dalian, China
Previously
Golden, CO - Heidleburg, Germany - Roswell, NM - Big Springs, TX - Snyder, TX - Midland, TX - Houston, TX - Austin, TX - Dripping Springs, TX - Xiangfan, China - Guangzhou, China
Links
Story
Tagline
Straddling two cultures...an American in China since 2005.
Introduction

Actually About Me...

I was a newspaper publisher and editor in a former life, where I lived for 25 years on a 50-acre slice of Texas hill country heaven, dabbled as a breeder of Arabian horses and German Short-haired Pointers and, in general, tried to let nature and light shine in.

Then, I moved to the most populated country on the planet.

I have been living in China since the fall of 2005, much longer than I originally planned. But quickly realized that one cannot adequately soak up the country, the culture, the people or the language without hanging in for the long term.

I got started on G+ as my virgin foray on a social network, not very long after G+ popped its own social network cherry. I love The Wall, but I've never posted to a wall. I know a twit when I see one, but I've never tweeted. And I've been living in the most populated country on the planet for almost eight years, so I've never been particularly motivated to get linked-in.

Content I'm interested in (no particular order):

  • China
  • Macintosh/Apple
  • iphoneography/rolling shutter
  • Photography
  • Censorship
  • Free Speech
  • Art

____________________

My Circle Management Policy
If you've found your way to my stream via a shared circle, please note the following:

  1. I no longer circle back as a simple courtesy.
  2. I'm looking for interaction, engagement – not numbers.
  3. I share primarily about China and Chinese culture.
  4. Yet, I'm not one-dimensional.

If you aren't interested in content intended to give you insight into China, perhaps even change your perspective, or engagement, then I'm probably just noise you don't need to add to your stream. If you found your way here via a search or hashtag, then chances are I might be worth your time.

Followers ≠ Readers
In the beginning, I had less than 100 followers. Now I'm creeping up on 5,000. Back then, I had a mere handful of growing relationships. Today, I can count those relationships on my hands and toes. Hence, I rather suspect that 95% of the people who circle me based on a shared circle have never even seen my stream. I'm just another grain of collective sand in the sandbox.

Readers ≠ Friends
I have no problem with people lurking – paddling by and paddling on. Hell, I do the same. Or doling out the occasional pats on the back (+1s), maybe even a high-five (re-share) and then rowing downstream. We all do that, right? But in real life, simply greeting one another occasionally doesn't a friend make.

Commenters < > Friends
I love geometry, but hate math in general, so maybe my formulas stink. Ask me if I care. But I do care about this aspect of G+ because this is how I've seen relationships grow in this community. Someone comments on my posts. Or I comment on their posts. We interact. We engage each other. And much to my amazement and gratification, I now have new friends from just about all over the globe. Simply because we did more than say hello.

___________________

Those G+ formulas above are a big, fat clue about how I manage circles. I use three basic circles...and very few specialized ones.

Read – users whose content I find interesting enough to make sure I'm current with whatever they're sharing, either daily or at least several times a week. I might lurk. I might pat on the back. I might even interact. But we're not necessarily friends and don't necessarily need to be.

Readers – users who drop by and comment often enough, via more than one word blips, will automatically be added. I will return the effort by checking out your content as often as possible. Whenever I find something engaging, I will interact with you in return. Maybe we'll become friends. Maybe not.

Friends – For whatever reason, I don't have a single real life friend who has joined G+. So, these are the people who have become my G+ buds. I see you. You see me. I enjoy you and I'm grateful for the reciprocal relationship.

Bragging rights
I know how to say fuck off in Chinese.
Education
  • University of Texas @ Austin
    Journalism
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Gender
Male
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