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Mike Reeves-McMillan
2,626 followers -
Novelist, short story writer, copy editor, book reviewer, nonfiction author
Novelist, short story writer, copy editor, book reviewer, nonfiction author

2,626 followers
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My publisher has put Mister Bucket for Assembly on Kindle Countdown for a few days.

Good-hearted characters must hold onto their integrity in a vicious and dangerous election.

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If "female superheroes have adventure and romance in the Napoleonic-era British military" is a premise that appeals to you as much as it does to me, this is a series you should check out.

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Story fodder. What about when illness changes your appearance? What about camouflage makeup to fool the systems? What about twins?
I Saw Her Face, Now I'm a Believer—Facial Recognition Tech Goes Mainstream http://suhub.co/2x6hoeX
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Got home yesterday from a three-day trip. There has been epic mewing, purring, face-rubbing, ankle-tangling, and lap camping.
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On the agenda for today: prepare Hope and the Clever Man for handover to my publisher.

I brought it out originally as a self-published book a couple of years ago, but +Michael Wills from Digital Fiction is now taking over publication of the Gryphon Clerks series, and I'm handing the already-published books over one at a time.

So far, that collaboration is going very well; he's a better marketer than I am (which isn't hard), and has significantly boosted my income from the books and, more importantly right now, their readership.

It's a good confidence boost, too, and has got me back writing that series again. I was too aware of how some of the books could have been better, and had lost sight of the fact that people enjoy them as they are.

This was brought home to me the other day when I decided to join in a thread on a private writing forum I'm part of where people were posting phrases from bad reviews as band names. I went to Amazon's AuthorCentral, which is the easiest place to scan through reviews when you have as many titles as I do, and found that very few of my Amazon reviews are less than four stars. Even on Goodreads, where people are often harsher and can leave just a drive-by rating without a review, my average across all my titles (including ones where I'm a contributor to an anthology or magazine) is 4.28. And the people who love the books love them a lot.

So anyway, Hope and the Clever Man is shifting to Digital Fiction, and the sixth Gryphon Clerks novel, Illustrated Gnome News, will join it probably by the end of the year.
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"What if we saw tribalism as a natural malfunction of any cognitive system, silicon or carbon? As neither a universal truth or unavoidable sin, but something to be overcome?"

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My takeaway from this: I don't even need to justify how smart devices embedded in or attached to my characters' bodies are communicating data.

Not that I was planning to attempt to justify that. I've been assuming that problem will be solved somehow or other for years.
Low-power device breaks barrier for sending data from afar - Futurity

Holy crap this is kind of amazing. I'm imagining the possibilities for cybernetic implants that can provide data about the body and maybe even feed you data. They made a prototype contact lens, but if this backscatter setup was used both ways, Google Glass and other augmented reality devices could be as unobtrusive as a pair of invisible contact lenses.

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Via a private share. I'm putting this under Collective Endeavour because problems of authority arise usually within a few microseconds of deciding to band together for some greater purpose.

I've experienced a number of different kinds of authority in my life, and I recognise a lot of them in the Harry Potter series. This piece does a good job of laying them out.

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A good interview from a writer with a clear voice.
"Most of the science fiction that I read growing up was filled with white men doing white men things—not to say that that’s bad or anything—but it just didn’t attract me. I started writing science fiction because on my trips to Nigeria I would notice technology being used in ways that I thought were unique and specific. When I saw this, I noticed that this is not how this part of the world was being portrayed in literature. So, that kind of made me want to just do it myself. I started writing it, because I wanted to see it. I wanted to read it."

Have you read any of her work? What did you think? I haven't, yet, but it's in the TBR pile.

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