Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Bernardo Jurema
473 followers -
here, there, everywhere
here, there, everywhere

473 followers
About
Bernardo's posts

Post has attachment
Chris Bickerton, lecturer in politics at University of Cambridge: "If the future of Western liberalism rests on Ms. Merkel’s shoulders, then it really is in trouble. She has often spoken in support of European and Western unity, but her actions have done little to strengthen them. Moreover, it’s not clear how deep her ideological commitment to liberalism really is — or, for that matter, whether she has any ideological commitments at all."



Post has attachment
I miss cycling in London

Post has attachment
Cet article par François Denord & Paul Lagneau-Ymonet explique bien comment Emmanuel Macron qui se présente comme le candidat anti-système est en fait un pur produit du système



Post has attachment
Andrew J. Bacevich: "What are we to make of the chasm between effort expended and results achieved? Why on those increasingly infrequent occasions when Afghanistan attracts notice do half-truths and pettifoggery prevail, rather than hard-nosed assessments? Why has Washington ceased to care about the Afghan war?

The answer, it seems to me, is this: As with budget deficits or cost overruns on weapons purchases, members of the national security apparatus — elected and appointed officials, senior military officers and other policy insiders — accept war as a normal condition.
[...]
With war transformed into a perpetual endeavor, expectations have changed. In Washington, war has become tolerable, an enterprise to be managed rather than terminated as quickly as possible. Like other large-scale government projects, war now serves as a medium through which favors are bestowed, largess distributed and ambitions satisfied."



Post has attachment
Amazing long read by Matt Stoller on how the most dangerously reactionary founder became a modern-day Liberal hero

Hamilton "is one of the most brilliant propaganda pieces in theatrical history. And its construction and success tell us a lot about our current political moment. [...] Set in contrast to the actual life and career of its subject, the play Hamilton is a feat of political alchemy—as is the stunningly successful marketing campaign surrounding it. But our generation’s version of Hamilton adulation isn’t all that different from the version that took hold in the 1920s: it’s designed to subvert democracy by helping the professional class to associate the rise of finance with the greatness of America, instead of seeing in that financial infrastructure the seeds of a dangerous authoritarian tradition. [...] Much of the turn toward a more reactionary version of white supremacy in the early 1800s, in other words, can be laid at Hamilton’s feet."



Post has attachment
Quando Diego Viana escreve, sempre vale à pena se sentar e ler. Uma das poucas pessoas que vem sistematicamente fazendo o difícil trabalho de buscar entender o que está ocorrendo no país, situar esse momento na história, captar as dinâmicas para além do noticiário cotidiano.


"Enquanto estamos eletrizados por crises momentâneas como o julgamento da chapa Dilma/Temer de 2014, a possibilidade de que tal ou ta político “vá para a cadeia”, as tentativas de tirar Lula do páreo, será que achamos que o resto do mundo congela? Pois não congela. Os últimos meses nos deram mostras bastante sensíveis dos efeitos práticos que podem sobrevir nos próximos anos, quando os recursos que sustentam nosso ensaio de sociedade civil estiverem definitiva e constitucionalmente congelados. Motins de policiais, massacres em presídios, escolas e orquestras fechando, linchamentos, casuísmo na política e na aplicação da lei…

Não há motivo para acreditar que esse cenário vá melhorar no curto prazo, exceto se um “choque positivo” nos mercados globais insuflar uma nova lufada de otimismo, e de ilusão, nos pulmões do país. Mas seria só uma brisa passageira, que não tocaria na dinâmica de longo prazo. Então prossegue a pergunta: e até lá?"



Post has attachment
Excellent lecture by Vivek Chibber of New York University on why the working class is at the center of socialist politics



Post has attachment
An insightful, thought-provoking conjunctural analysis by historian Perry Anderson of UCLA:
"In reality, there is a wide gap between the degree of popular disillusion with today’s neoliberal EU — by last summer, majorities in France and Spain expressed their aversion to it, and even in Germany, barely half of those polled had a positive opinion of it — and the extent of support for forces declaring against it. Indignation or disgust at what the EU has become is common, but for some time the fundamental determinant of European voting patterns has been, and remains, fear. The socio-economic status quo is widely detested. But it is regularly ratified at the polls with the re-election of parties responsible for it, because of fears that to upset the status, alarming markets, would bring worse misery. The single currency has not accelerated growth in Europe, and has inflicted acute hardship in the countries of the south worst affected. But the prospect of an exit terrifies even those who know by now how much they have suffered from it. Fear trumps anger. Hence the acquiescence of the Greek electorate in Syriza’s capitulation to Brussels, the setbacks of Podemos in Spain, the shuffling of feet by the Parti de Gauche in France. The underlying sense is everywhere the same. The system is bad. To affront it is to risk retribution.
[...]
The British referendum and the US election were anti-systemic convulsions of the right, though flanked by anti-systemic upsurges of the left (the Bernie Sanders movement in the US and the Corbyn phenomenon in the UK), smaller in scale, if still less expected. What the consequences of Trump or Brexit will be remain indeterminate, though no doubt more limited than current predictions. The established order is far from beaten in either country, and, as Greece has shown, is capable of absorbing and neutralising revolts from whatever direction with impressive speed. Among the antibodies it has already generated are yuppie simulacra of populist breakthroughs (Albert Rivera in Spain, Emmanuel Macron in France), inveighing against the deadlocks and corruptions of the present, and promising a cleaner and more dynamic politics of the future, beyond the decaying parties."



Post has attachment
Masha Gessen, a writer in residence at Oberlin College and the author of several books on Russia: "The backbone of the rapidly yet endlessly developing Trump-Putin story is leaks from intelligence agencies, and this is its most troublesome aspect. Virtually none of the information can be independently corroborated. The context, sequence, and timing of the leaks is determined by people unknown to the public, which is expected to accept anonymous stories on faith; nor have we yet been given any hard evidence of active collusion by Trump officials.
[...]
The dream fueling the Russia frenzy is that it will eventually create a dark enough cloud of suspicion around Trump that Congress will find the will and the grounds to impeach him. If that happens, it will have resulted largely from a media campaign orchestrated by members of the intelligence community—setting a dangerous political precedent that will have corrupted the public sphere and promoted paranoia. And that is the best-case outcome.
More likely, the Russia allegations will not bring down Trump.
[...]
Meanwhile, while Russia continues to dominate the front pages, Trump will continue waging war on immigrants, cutting funding for everything that’s not the military, assembling his cabinet of deplorables—with six Democrats voting to confirm Ben Carson for Housing, for example, and ten to confirm Rick Perry for Energy. According to the Trump plan, each of these seems intent on destroying the agency he or she is chosen to run—to carry out what Steve Bannon calls the “deconstruction of the administrative state.” As for Sessions, in his first speech as attorney general he promised to cut back civil rights enforcement and he has already abandoned a Justice Department case against a discriminatory Texas voter ID law. But it was his Russia lie that grabbed the big headlines.
[...]
Russiagate is helping him—both by distracting from real, documentable, and documented issues, and by promoting a xenophobic conspiracy theory in the cause of removing a xenophobic conspiracy theorist from office."



Post has attachment
Wait while more posts are being loaded