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Domenico Monaco
Works at Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati
Attended University of Rome La Sapienza
Lives in Trieste
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Domenico Monaco

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Banana for scale.

via +Joerg Fliege 
 
Can you help this poor man find his father?
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Me and +Brain Diable​ at Rock Werchter 2015
#RW15
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Diary of a PhD Thesis - Entry 2

From 0 to 160 pages in just one click.

The power of \include.

#LaTeX
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Scientists never stop obsessing over memes.

#TheDress  
 
 Not one, but three new studies emerged this week in a scientific journal seeking to explain the still-puzzling Internet phenomenon that is The Dress.

"There will be dozens and dozens of papers about it over the years. This is just the beginning," Wellesley professor Bevil Conway tells the Los Angeles Times. The pieces in Current Biology are united in the idea that we all see the dress differently because we make different assumptions about the color of the light illuminating it, the LA Times reports. "You have in your head an internal model of what the colors of the world are, and that helps you resolve ambiguities," Conway notes. Your brain isn't getting enough information from the bad picture of the dress that was circulating, he tells the The New York Times, "so the brain has to turn to the internal model and say, ‘Hey, guru, what do you think is going on out there?'" Also among the findings:

• Brains that think the dress is being colored by a blue sky will ignore blue; the dress, for them, is white and gold. But if we're perceiving the dress as being lit by an orange incandescent bulb, it's a blue and black dress that we see (which is correct, given normal lighting, the LA Times reminds us).

• Overall, a study finds, 57% of people see blue and black, 30% see white and gold, and 11% see blue and brown, according to a poll of 1,400 people (2% see other colors). Women and elderly people have higher odds of seeing a white and gold outfit, while men and younger folks tend to see the actual colors of blue and black, according to the same study, led by Conway. Researchers theorize that could be because women and older people are awake more in the daytime, so they have more of a tendency to assume a blue sky is affecting their perceptions.

• There's also the possibility that bluish shadows are coming into play, notes a study led by Michael Webster of the University of Nevada, Reno. That gets us into the habit of ignoring the color blue. In fact, when researchers replaced the blue with yellow, people stopped disagreeing about the color, with most clearly seeing the yellow: "When you see a bluish tint you attribute it to the light, and when you see a yellowish tint you attribute it to the object," Webster says. That study found participants were evenly divided in seeing white and gold or blue and black, the New York Times reports.

• As for that frustrating lace: A pixel analysis shows it as brown, Conway tells the New York Times. Some saw it as gold, it seems, because their brains told them it was shiny.

Text from: http://www.newser.com/story/206885/studies-pour-in-to-finally-shed-light-on-the-dress.html
Three teams of scientists looked at the perceptions that led to the viral phenomenon of the blue and black (or was it white and gold?) dress.
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If you play on a board with sufficiently many dimensions, then multi-player n-in-a-row tic-tac-toe cannot end in a draw, no matter how large n is, and no matter how many people are playing.
 
Mathematics is weird.

Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramsey_theory
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Diary of a PhD Thesis - Entry 3

While waiting for my advisor to read the introduction - the only novel part of the thesis, the rest is a collection of published papers - I got back to the fun part: layout management.

Thanks to the precious help of my personal debugger and beta tester Francesca Arici I think I have the thesis LaTeX class ready.

I guess now I'm stuck with the boring science to separate the wondrous headers/footers and fill between the meticolously computed side margins.
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always happy to find bugs!
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Go New Horizons! We hope to hear back from you soon :)

Related material (sort of...): http://what-if.xkcd.com/137/
 
Stunning last image that the New Horizons spacecraft transmitted before it began its final approach to Pluto.
NASA's New Horizons spacecraft beams back its best picture yet of the dwarf planet.
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Jupiter Venus & Moon

#astronomy 
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I think this is actually a big deal. New experimental data rule out some quantum gravity theories of space-time foam structure.

I particularly like how these data come from astrophysics, rather than high-energy particle collision experiments. Having a theory of quantum gravity will probably be the greatest achievement of physics, but it is still to come. This has given many scientists the opportunity to basically make up any kind of theory, covering behind the fact that it should account for systems of such high energy that we cannot probe them with the current tecnology. Being able to finally start chopping off some of the many branches that have grown on the tree of quantum gravity proposals is definitely good news.
Brian Koberlein originally shared to Our Universe:
 
Foamy Evidence

Modern cosmology is dominated by two fundamental theories: general relativity, which describes the structure of space and time as manifold that interacts with mass/energy (aka gravity), and quantum theory, which describes the fundamental interactions of protons, electrons, light, etc. (aka quanta). Both models are strongly supported by experimental and observational evidence. The problem is that each theory makes fundamental assumptions about the way the universe works, and they contradict each other at a basic level. This isn’t a problem if you are interested in things on a large scale, such as planets and galaxies (general relativity), or things on a small scale such as nuclear fusion (quantum theory). The contradiction arises when you want to understand objects that are both very dense and interact at high energies, such as black hole interiors, the big bang, etc. So one of the challenges of modern cosmology is to develop a unified theory of quantum gravity, which would combine the predictions of general relativity and quantum theory in a consistent way.

There are lots of approaches to quantum gravity, including string theory and loop quantum gravity, that try to unify these two models, but one of the big challenges is that many of their predictions are difficult if not impossible to verify. But new observations of distant quasars has put some observational constraints on the type of unified model the universe might allow.

The research focuses on a property common to most unified theory approaches, known as quantum foam. The idea behind quantum foam is that at a fundamental level the quantum aspect of things dominates. This means that on a small enough scale, the precise nature of space and time itself breaks down into a nebulous flurry of quantum fluctuations or quantum foam. In this approach the structure of space and time we see around us is a macroscopic approximation arising out of this foam, just as a table appears solid when in fact it is a dynamic interaction of atoms and molecules. The scale at which the foamy nature of spacetime becomes evident is known as the Planck scale, which is about 10 billionths of the width of a proton. That’s far too small for us to probe directly.

But it turns out that this quantum foam (assuming it exists) should interact very slightly with light. Basically, a photon traveling through spacetime has a tiny chance of interacting with the quantum foam in such a way that its wavelength and direction could be changed. The chances of such an interaction is so small as to almost be zero, but over a billion light year journey it would have a measurable effect. Depending on the quantum foam modal, distant light could appear blurred at certain wavelengths so that our view of distant quasars would become too blurry to be observed.

Based upon observations of distant quasars, the team found no evidence of any quantum foam blurring. Given the constraints of their observations, this means that spacetime is completely smooth down to a scale of at least a thousandth of the width of a proton. This is actually precise enough to eliminate some quantum foam models. In particular, it eliminates one popular model known as the holographic model. As the authors point out, while the holographic model is a popular model relying upon the holographic principle, this research doesn’t invalidate the holographic principle itself.

So to the limits of observation, there is no evidence for a quantum foam. Whether it exists but has more subtle effects is something that will require further research.

Paper: E. S. Perlman et al. New Constraints on Quantum Gravity from X-ray and Gamma-Ray Observations. ApJ 805 10 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/805/1/10 (2015)
New observations of distant quasars find no evidence for quantum foam, and proves that the universe is not a hologram.
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Diary of a PhD thesis - Entry 1

After only three days of fiddling with the code, I could get the header and the footer of my thesis to work just the way I want.

Scientific content is irrelevant.

#MasterOfLaTeX 
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David Jao's profile photoannarita ruberto's profile photoDomenico Monaco's profile photoAndrew King (science student)'s profile photo
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Hi, wondering which LaTeX editor(s) you use? I quite like Texmaker, TeXworks and TeXstudio, though I've a number of others installed that I'm about to check out — all Linux or cross-platform. I'm new to LaTeX / TeX, so still browsing editors to find which ones I prefer. Good luck with your thesis.
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I can't say I had a similar experience, but in her own way my mother was always supportive of my pursue of science and mathematics in particular. From time to time, I also managed to make her proud of me in return.

Happy Mother's day.
Brian Koberlein originally shared to Our Universe:
 
Wonder

My Mother is a strong, God-fearing woman. In addition to doing the usual duties of a farmer’s wife, she focused on helping others in the community. To this day she still volunteers at the local elementary school, tutoring children who are struggling with reading.

Science was not something she strongly embraced, particularly on topics like evolution and cosmology. So what to do with a child who had a deep interest in science? Early on she could help make baking soda volcanoes, or collect and categorize leaves for a school project, but as her son delved more deeply into books and starting rambling about black holes and subatomic particles it became something she struggled to understand.

Rather than ignoring or discouraging her son’s interests, she focused on what she knew to be true. The universe is a wondrous creation. When I looked at the moons of Jupiter with a small telescope, and saw their positions change night after night, she watched them too, and noted their wondrous precision. When I wanted to get up at 3am to see a meteor shower, or a lunar eclipse, she was there, and filled with awe. She helped me find the Andromeda galaxy in the night sky, and was amazed at how distant a galaxy could be.

She didn’t necessarily believe all the things scientists said about the universe, but she saw wonder in all of it, and tried to instill that sense of awe in her son. She also made it clear that the knowledge we gain about the universe doesn’t diminish its awe.

The sense of wonder she instilled in me is part of what drove me to become an astrophysicist. The importance of doing good in the community, which she nurtured in me, is part of the reason I write this blog. To this day my Mother isn’t entirely sure what I do, but she’s proud of the scientist I’ve become.

While it is worth celebrating scientists who were also mothers, it is also worth celebrating those who were mothers of scientists. God knows I wasn’t an easy child to raise, and yet my Mother did it with grace while managing a farm.

And that makes her a wonder.
Moms who raise a scientist are a wonder.
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Ph.D. student in Mathematical Physics
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    Ph.D. student, 2011 - present
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  • University of Rome La Sapienza
    Matematica, 2006 - 2009
  • University of Rome La Sapienza
    Matematica (LS), 2009 - 2011
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Domenico Monaco's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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Ultimate Survey Site Downloader - Internet & Computer Hacking
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Get rid of the survey when you download at any survey site with Ultimate Survey Site Downloader

Duet
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Войдите в гипнотический транс и почувствуйте тесную взаимосвязь сущностей в игре Duet. Правила просты: управляйте двумя синхронно движущимис

Il fosforo sarà il semiconduttore del futuro? - Tutto Android
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Il fosforo potrebbe essere un elemento importante nel futuro dell'industria elettronica. Una ricerca della Rice University guidata da Boris

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È morta Margherita Hack
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Aveva 91 anni ed è stata uno dei più importanti astrofisici italiani

Google+
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Stay connected and share life as it happens FEATURES: - Enjoy magazine style layout in the new tablet version - Automatically share photos t

La beffa dei #dottorandi
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16/4/2012. La beffa dei #dottorandi. #Tassate le borse di studio per #ricercatori e specializzazione e formazione medica. Due giorni di scio

Honeycomb nets from bismuth cubes
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Researchers from the TU Dresden and the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, both in Dresden, have synthesized a new ma

Jesus Will Survive - Jesus Christ! The Musical
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Parody of "Jesus" singing I Will Survive. Obviously this video will be considered offensive to some and hysterical to others. Try to refrain

Supersymmetry Fails Test, Forcing Physics to Seek New Ideas: Scientific ...
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With the Large Hadron Collider unable to find the particles that the theory says must exist, the field of particle physics is back to its "n

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Fecondazione assistita, OGM, politiche energetiche, sicurezza del territorio e altro ancora. Un gruppo di giornalisti, blogger, ricercatori

Una memoria elettronica trasparente e flessibile - Le Scienze
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La corteccia posteromediale, un'importante struttura cerebrale che partecipa alla memoria autobiografica, viene disattivata quando si è impe

GAME OF FUCKIN' THRONES
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The way the Game Of Thrones intro was meant to be seen. Featuring original lyrics by George R.R. Martin himself. Watch Season 2 April 1st on

One of the best atheism quotes ever (worth reading)
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Samsung Galaxy S i9000: disponibile in Italia il Feature Pack Gingerbread
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A distanza di circa un mese dal rilascio in Corea del Feature Pack di Android Gingerbread per il Samsung Galaxy S, eccolo finalmente sbarcar