Profile cover photo
Profile photo
John Suler
1,315 followers -
Clinical psychology professor at Rider University specializing in cyberpsychology & photography
Clinical psychology professor at Rider University specializing in cyberpsychology & photography

1,315 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
THE DECISIVE MOMENT

For those who might be interested, here's a link to a video of my talk about "the decisive moment" at the International Center of Photography.

https://www.icp.org/browse/archive/media/john-suler-on-photography-psychology-and-henri-cartier-bresson
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
ICM AS SELF-PORTRAIT

If any photo we take is a kind of self-portrait because it reflects something about ones' personality, what do ICM photos say about the photographer? In this case, it's New York City taken from atop the One World Trade Center.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
THAT'S ME ALL OVER

Of course at the top of the One World Trade Center people didn't just take selfies of themselves, but also of the cityscape below. We only take photos of things that interest us, that reflect our interests and lifestyles, that reflect something about our personality. So that's why some people say that every photo we take is, in an indirect sort of way, a selfie.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I'VE GOT YOU, UNDER MY SCREEN

Technically speaking, a selfie is a photo you take of yourself, a self portrait. If you include someone else in that photo, it's not their selfie. It's still your selfie, but by including them you are indicating how they play an important role in your life, in how you define yourself, perhaps how you even have them so deep in the heart of you that they're really a part of you.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
SELFIES TAKE THE HIGH GROUND

At the top of the One World Trade Center a high camera angle selfie makes sense: it produces a photo with the city below as the background.

It's also a popular camera angle in general for selfies, probably because people like how it emphasizes the eyes – and also the hair, which is a good thing assuming you're not having a bad hair day. But beware of how this type of selfie can give you a big head, literally and maybe also figuratively. Your head might start to look like a light bulb.

We're looking down at the person in a high camera angle selfie, which makes the person seem below and smaller than us. That fits well with the diminutive connotation of the word "selfie."



Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
SELFIE CHIMPING

If you look at your LCD screen a lot while taking photos, that's called "chimping." It's a bit of a derogatory term, especially among street photographers who think you should remain focused on the scene around you rather than checking to see how "good" your last shot was. Chimping takes you out of the flow of photographing. Stare at your screen too much and you will miss opportunities for a spotting a good picture.

It's probably also good advice for taking selfies. Rather than looking at every single selfie you take before you take another one, try staying in the flow of taking a series of photos as you change your camera angle and pose. It's more spontaneous that way. After all, when you watch professionals doing portraits, you rarely see them chimping much at all. They just keep photographing, and wait until later to see which picture is the gem.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I'M (not?) HERE

A selfie taken to let friends and family know that you visited a certain place is a wonderful thing. It brings them visually into the scene, and it's proof of your having been there. But the great irony of taking such selfies over and over again to get the "perfect" one is that it draws your attention away from truly experiencing the place you're visiting.

The same dilemma happens with photographing anything. Spend too much time photographing it and you're probably spending too little time experiencing it. Learning to truly experience the situation as the venue for photographing it is the real challenge of photography. Even harder than that is truly seeing yourself before taking that selfie.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
SELFIES, SELFIES, EVERYWHERE

So here's the series topic you've all been waiting for! (or not)... The Selfie!

After giving my talk at the International Center of Photography, my wife and I visited some of the famous tourist attractions offered by The Big Apple, including a trip to the top of the One World Trade Center.

Now we all know that selfies are a big thing nowadays, but I was nevertheless stunned at how many people were taking them, every where you look, by people of all different ages and backgrounds. It was almost impossible to take a photograph of any area of the observation room at the top of the tower without having in it at least one person taking a selfie. So I decided to take photos of people taking photos of themselves.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
THE DECISIVE MOMENT
(at The International Center of Photography)

I had a great time giving my talk about the decisive moment at ICP in New York this week. The audience had great comments and questions. I believe ICP will be making a video of my presentation available on their website.

One women in the audience mentioned how she had once met Cartier-Bresson. When she tried to take a photo of him, he covered his face with his hand (he didn't particularly like being photographed). I said to her, "That was a decisive moment!"

#internationalcenterofphotography #decisivemoment #cartierbresson
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
THE DECISIVE MOMENT
(Curiosity about an Ambiguity)

Some decisive photographs offer a curious ambiguity that gets you wondering what the outcome of the story might be.

In this photo the young woman on tippy-toes reaches up to wrap her arms around her man's neck and kiss him. He returns the kiss with one arm around her, but leaves the other arm dangling at his side. I always wonder whether or not he will raise that arm to return her full embrace. Might he be reluctant to fully reciprocate her affection, or does he have something in that dangling hand that prevents him from holding her?
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded