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I'm working on an update to my 2009 article, Top 10 Programming Fonts (http://hivelogic.com/articles/top-10-programming-fonts/). I have a pretty good list of fonts going already, but it seems that I always miss a few.

So this time around I wanted to open the floodgates a bit and invite you to share your favorite programming font with me for scrutiny before I start writing the article.

My requirements for consideration are two:

1. It must be a monospace font. I get that there's a special breed of developer who enjoys coding in Zapfino, but for the purposes of this article, I'm sticking to monospace.

2. It must be free to download and use as a programming font. Last time I included Consolas as an exception because it's included for free with many applications, but generally I'm looking for free fonts.

Please include a link so we can try out your suggestion.

Thanks.
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51 comments
 
A fan of monaco on OS X. Nice to look at and simple to work with. On Windows, I use Consolas. As you mentioned, it is also a very nice font, and it's on most windows machines by default these days (I think it might come with a windows 7 install, not sure on this). Not a fan of Courier or Courier new by any means.
 
Yeah I go between Ubuntu Monospace and Consolas.
 
I'm a big fan of Panic Sans. That doesn't really meet your second criteria, unless you've already bought Coda. In that case, you can pull it out of the Coda package and use it elsewhere (maybe not strictly legal, but I'd say the Panic folks would probably be fine with it).

Also, real programmers use Zapf Dingbats. (I am not a real programmer, I'm more of a designer.)
 
Monospaced fonts: Nitti Light, The Sans Mono, DejaVu Sans Mono. Favorite: Droid Sans Mono.
 
Deja Vu Sans Mono (open source derivative+expansion of Bitstream Vera Sans Mono).
 
I use the editor's default font, in my case either Panic Sans or Espresso Mono, but I believe they're both just variants of Deja Vu Sans Mono. Definitely interested to see what you come up with!
 
Was a fan of Consolas on Windows. Now I'm on OS X I'm using Monaco.
 
Wow, programming in Zapfino, that sounds fantastic, I might have to just test it out - good recommendation, Dan!
 
I've used Anonymous Pro for a long time and can't really complain.
 
+Drew McLellan Inconsolata looks so great... except for the lower case t - ruins the whole font imo. Just doesn't fit.
 
Another vote for Anonymous Pro. Works great for me as I like a slightly larger size (13 pt) on my higher ppi screens.
 
I have settled on Inconsolata for both Windows and OS X.
 
I'm still rockin' the Deja Vu Sans Mono.
 
consolas is king. if only it (a) was free and (b) didn't have a jacked-up baseline in lion.
 
I use Monaco, antialiased (which makes a huge difference -- I woudln't use it if this weren't an option), Mac OS X.
 
Monaco (and I agree on the anti-aliasing - only way it's usable). It also makes a difference that I typically use white text on a black background. For black-on-white, I like Inconsolata, but it Monaco looks better for white-on-black.
 
Inconsolata, still going strong after several years. Combines really well with Solarized.
 
I still love Consolas on my Macs. I use it for pretty much anything monospaced.
 
Perhaps add to your criteria that it should include bold, italic, and bold+italics since we have code highlighting themes which include those variations too.
 
I like Lucida Console (8pt) a bit better than Lucida Sans Typewriter, FWIW. Otherwise, Consolas (9pt) on Windows or Deja Vu Sans Mono (9pt), or Menlo on Mac.
 
Menlo is fantastic. Panic Sans was an improvement on Deja Vu Sans Mono, but Menlo is an improvement on both. Also has bold, italic, and bold italic variants.
 
Consolas combines great usability, readability, and aesthetics with being reasonably freely available on both Mac and Windows (DKDC about Linux). I've used a lot of different monospaced fonts, including a few that I paid for, and nothing else is nearly as good.
 
Cousine by Steve Matteson of Ascender: http://www.google.com/webfonts/specimen/Cousine

It's beautifully crisp and clear under Windows ClearType (because it it exceptionally well hinted) and it has real italic and bold variants. It's uncommonly polished and complete for a free font.
 
Very much like Consolas here.
 
Inconsolata-g. It's derived from Inconsolata-dz which straightened the prime and double prime. DZ made a bunch of other smaller changes too, like making the square brackets the same height as the curly braces.

http://leonardo-m.livejournal.com/77079.html
 
+Anthony Perez-Sanz The Liberation fonts are GPL and so I would guess that Google asked Matteson to tweak and release under the SIL Open Font License. The result is Cousine. Just a guess.
 
Inconsolata. I'm not a hard-core programmer – I'm a designer – but when I fire up Terminal or edit HTML, this is what I want to see. The slashed 0 is great! And overall it has a very European feel. Definitely.
 
I just read your article on your Top 10 Programming Fonts
While it's still a great list, I saw the date–circa 2009–and decided I'd search for a newer post or list. 

How did you go updating the post?
If you've reviewed your post and added anything new then you should update the date to reflect that. 

Personally, I think I'm going to settle for DeJa Vu Sans Mono http://dejavu-fonts.org/wiki/index.php?title=Main_Page. I would use Droid Sans Mono http://damieng.com/blog/2007/11/14/droid-font-family-courtesy-of-google-ascender, except for the fact that it doesn't have a slashed zero. 
 
How can I get Brahmi font ? Please help me ..
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