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Internet Freedom Movement
10,955 followers -
The page formerly known as "Stop SOPA"
The page formerly known as "Stop SOPA"

10,955 followers
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Internet Freedom Movement's posts

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Does anyone currently use a VPN, or (as a result of the new legislation) are you considering diving into one?

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A Defeat for Privacy?
House Republicans moved to dismantle rules created by the Federal Communications Commission in October. Those rules, which had been slated to go into effect later this year, had required broadband providers to receive permission before collecting data on a user’s online activities. The US Senate approved the bill last week, and it now goes to Trump's desk for his signature.

House Republicans moved to dismantle rules created by the Federal Communications Commission in October. Those rules, which had been slated to go into effect later this year, had required broadband providers to receive permission before collecting data on a user’s online activities.

Good? Bad?

#RogerRHK


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The U.S. Senate on Thursday voted narrowly to repeal regulations requiring internet service providers to do more to protect customers’ privacy.

According to the rules approved by the Federal Communications Commission in October under then-President Barack Obama, internet providers would need to obtain consumer consent before using precise geolocation, financial information, health information, children’s information and web browsing history for advertising and internal marketing.

It isn't known at this time when the House of Representatives will take up the measure. I'll try to keep you in the loop...

#RogerRHK 

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Court Orders no longer necessary?
The FBI cracked a San Bernardino terrorist’s phone with the help of professional hackers who discovered and brought to the bureau at least one previously unknown software flaw. The new information was then used to create a piece of hardware that helped the FBI to crack the iPhone’s four-digit personal identification number without triggering a security feature that would have erased all the data. The researchers, who typically keep a low profile, specialize in hunting for vulnerabilities in software and then in some cases selling them to the U.S. government. 

They were paid a one-time flat fee for the solution.
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In the poll from a few weeks ago, most were in agreement that Apple should not comply with a court order to provide software to unlock the phone. It appears that the FBI has found another way in. What do you think of this new tactic?

^R

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They're in
Law enforcement’s ability to now unlock an iPhone through an alternative method raises new uncertainties, including questions about the strength of security in Apple devices. The development also creates potential for new conflicts between the government and Apple about the method used to open the device and whether that technique will be disclosed. Lawyers for Apple have previously said the company would want to know the procedure used to crack open the smartphone, yet the government might classify the method.

The feds received man requests from people all over the world for an attempt at unlocking it. It looks like they succeeded. But will the goverment tell Apple how they did it? Not likely.

^R

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The basics from both sides.

Video via The +Washington Post 

^R

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Who's watching you?
Along with some great background and info on "trackers" +The New York Times tests and reviews four of the best free privacy tools: Ghostery, Disconnect, RedMorph and Privacy Badger. If you use one, we'd love to hear what you think, and if you know of other free (and safe) tools that are out there, feel free to share!

^Roger

   #OnlinePrivacy  

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Should Apple comply with a US Department of Justice order to unlock the iPhone belonging to the San Bernadino shooters/terrorists?

The court said that Apple must create new software that would bypass security features on the iPhone used by the terrorist, Syed Rizwan Farook. That would allow the FBI to unlock the device and retrieve the pictures, messages and other data on it. The ruling was based on the All Writs Act of 1789, which is used to require people or businesses not involved in a case to execute court orders. Apple has refused.

What say you?
115 votes
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votes visible to Public
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No way!
This time, yes. Special circumstance.
4%
Yes. It's a court order so they have to.
86%
No way!
10%
This time, yes. Special circumstance.

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Google CEO chimes in on Apple v. FBI
"Forcing companies to enable hacking could compromise users’ privacy.  We know that law enforcement and intelligence agencies face significant challenges in protecting the public against crime and terrorism. We build secure products to keep your information safe and we give law enforcement access to data based on valid legal orders. But that’s wholly different than requiring companies to enable hacking of customer devices & data. Could be a troubling precedent. Looking forward to a thoughtful and open discussion on this important issue."  - Google CEO, Sundar Pichai ....on Twitter.

Not as strong of a stance as Apple's... It'll be very interesting to see how this all develops over the coming months.

^Roger
 
+Ars Technica  #Apple  

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Apple Defies Government Order on iPhone Data
Apple is opposing a judge's order to help the FBI break into the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino, California, shooters, calling the directive "an overreach by the U.S. government."

""The government is asking Apple to hack our own users and undermine decades of security advancements that protect our customers -- including tens of millions of American citizens -- from sophisticated hackers and cybercriminals."

What say you? Is this "overreach"? Should government be able to access personal data in instances like this, or should it always be off-limits? 

The entire letter from Apple can be found here:  http://www.apple.com/customer-letter/

(Thanks to +The New York Times)

Roger K.
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