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Casey Koons
Attends Syracuse University
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Casey Koons

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Mike, I would REALLY like to hear your thoughts on this.

I have been itching to start youtube show of my own for several years now. One of the topics closest to my concern and certain to be a central feature of the show would be the representation of women in today's varied media. But there is a deeply compelling argument that has been made against my creating another talking-white-hetero-guy-show, if my concern lies with the under-represented.

An example of this involves a discussion I had online with a fellow male librarian about the glass escalator (you can see the post and my discussion with the fellow here: http://nascentlibrarian.wordpress.com/2013/03/12/libraries-glass-escalator/). The Nascent Librarian reported on this issue but then argued that his voice was not needed, as what is needed for the advancement of women's issues is not MORE but FEWER 'white-cisdudes' speaking. He argued, quite persuasively, that in an area already skewed to benefit people like us, I should LISTEN and let others speak for themselves.

I am deeply conflicted by this. I feel a strong creative desire to join the conversation and contribute to the sharing of ideas here on YouTube and elsewhere. But I also wonder if that would help to bring about the kind of change I would like to see.

In order for more under-represented voices to be heard, do the over-represented need to refrain from speaking? And, if so, what can the privileged do to support the better representation of the biased and the scorned?
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Casey Koons

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Terminus. A sandbox, real physics, space-rpg. Needs to be done again.
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Casey Koons

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Casey Koons

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Mainers love their roundabouts too.
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Casey Koons

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Yummy.
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Casey Koons

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<librarian speak>
I think that archiving involves more than the mere collection of information. To archive is to organize distinct informational artifacts into a meaningful system of relationships. I see this both in the way library call numbers group books by subject (and purport to, in their scope, cover the entirety of human knowledge), but also in the way the books and curios on my shelves at home serve to tell a story about me as a collection, through their selection and arrangement.

I think that the technologies that have really changed the way we think of archiving are search and data-mining. A primary reason to organize information is to make the information accessible:  so that I can find the book on the shelf. But with some digital information, the power of search removes this need. I used to organize my email into folders, but now I simply search it. In Google you have to use a hack to get the delete button back. They assume you'll want to 'archive' every email you get.

In a strange way, the massive everything-in bucket of my email over the years is also a document about me. Unlike my bookshelves, it's not curated, but technology can quickly separate the meaning from the ephemera. A cataloged archive is about forming meaningful systems of relation out of a collection of information. But today, computers can discover patterns of meaningful relation in collections of data, effectively removing the need for us to do it ourselves. This is not to say there is no need for humans to do this work. Locating information isn’t the only reason to archive and catalog it.
</librarian>
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Casey Koons

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I agree that humans are awesome. I think this video exposes the failure of the environmental movement. We think that we 'hurt the earth' in some way through our effect on the global climate and biodiversity, but the earth has a long clock. Toxic rivers, given ten or twenty thousand years, will get clean. The earth has suffered massive loses in biodiversity only to bounce back with vertebrates, dinosaurs and humans. The earth can handle it.

It's we humans that can't. The current level of consumption by the world's few fortunate (nearly everyone reading this is a member of this group), consume TOO MUCH of the world's energy in the form of energy, food, travel, etc. If we truly want a world in which all people can live a healthy and productive life, then we have to be prepared to make some radical changes. Changes like rethinking cars and airplanes, like rethinking consumer electronics. The pursuit of technological innovation is not ethical.

I may post a video about this. Let me know if you think I should.
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Casey Koons

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In defense of Voodoo Doctors:
While it may be argued that our 'science doctors' have greater authority to interrupt the world and provide us with understanding than alternative traditional world-views, I feel it worth stressing that the nocebo effect works for 'science' doctors for the exact same reason it works for 'voodoo' doctors: as you say: because we are /stupid/ enough to believe him or her.

It just so happens that in our world, science and medicine are revered to the the sources of a certain fundamental understanding and so the doctors of that science are vested with tangible power. I think it's true to say that many of us, if not most of us, belief more in the authority and truth of 'science' because we have faith in it and those who practice it, rather than because of a scientific understanding of those truths.

It does not follow that our science doctor, lying, and saying 'this will hurt' is therefore in someway more true than the Voodoo doctor's hex. It's just a matter of different world-views. A 'science doctor' in a different society would likely find his or her power to trigger nocebo lessened in comparison to the holders of authority inside that culture.
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Casey Koons

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I find boycotts often run dangerously toward slacktivism. Boycotts are rarely effective at hurting the bottom line for companies. This isn't to say that I think spending money is not political or even an ethical act, but refusing to spend money for something isn't really an action. If we want to succeed in making the world a genuinely better place, we can't something so trivial as 'I skipped Ender's Game' satisfy our desire to actually do something good.
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Casey Koons

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This is strange. I really didn't think I had any feelings of loyalty to Facebook until this moment…
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Let them go. You'll feel much better about looking at all that they are. ;-)
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Have him in circles
27 people
Daina Bouquin's profile photo
Irene Reid's profile photo
Myev Rees's profile photo
Jennifer Reid's profile photo
Donovan Schaefer's profile photo
Daniel Cheifer's profile photo
Molly Wilber's profile photo
Tyra Twomey-Smith's profile photo
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  • Syracuse University
    Library and Information Science, present
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a humanist geek, learning about information and seeking good.
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