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Chemical biology for everyone !
Chemical biology for everyone !

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On April 2-6, 2017, the 253rd American Chemical Society National Meeting will be held in San Francisco, CA. The PubChem team will be at the ACS meeting to present new developments and recent changes in PubChem. To learn more about this, please read this post (https://go.usa.gov/xXKGH).

PubChem now uses the latest IUPAC recommendations for atomic mass and isotopic composition information. In addition, the allowed isotopes for a given element are restricted to those with a half-life of one millisecond or greater. These changes affect the molecular weight values computed for nearly all compounds in PubChem. Please read this post (http://go.usa.gov/x8RqD).

The PubChem Data Sources page is now updated. It helps you to find who provided what information in PubChem. The updated interface has a new look and feel with a unified data source table containing all primary information. This interface provides new and improved capabilities to navigate as a function of data type, category, and country, while also including keyword searching, counts, and geographical visualization. To learn more, please read this post (http://go.usa.gov/xk7xU).

PubChem Widgets 2.0f is released. PubChem Widgets enable scientific web developers to display PubChem content within webpages they design. All data comes directly from PubChem and, therefore, obviates the need to mirror that content. This makes it easier to harness the vast scientific knowledge within PubChem on your own webpage, such as summaries of patents, bioactivities and PubMed articles linked to a PubChem record. PubChem Widgets 2.0f substantially updates all table-based widgets and classification widgets, while adding new capabilities and features. To learn more, please read this post (http://go.usa.gov/xKpv5).

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On August 21-25, 2016, the 252nd American Chemical Society National Meeting will be held in Philadelphia, PA. The PubChem team will be at the ACS meeting to present new developments and recent changes in PubChem. In addition, there will be a Herman Skolnik Award Reception honoring Drs. Stephen Bryant and Evan Bolton for their leadership in the PubChem project. To learn more about this, please read this post (http://bit.ly/2aVkit2).

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PubChem will adopt a HTTPS-only policy on September 30, 2016. This means PubChem will no longer support HTTP web URLs after that date. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) recently announced important changes to NCBI Web Protocols to comply with the US federal government's HTTPS-only policy for all publicly accessible websites. PubChem, as a part of NCBI, will adopt the same HTTPS-only policy. To read more about this, see the PubChem Blog (http://bit.ly/2aJ63oH).

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On March 13-17, 2016, the 251st American Chemical Society National Meeting will be held in San Diego, CA, the theme of which is “Computers in Chemistry”.  The PubChem team will be at the ACS meeting to present new developments and recent changes in PubChem.  To learn more about this, please read this post (http://1.usa.gov/1QBp0aE).

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A new article about the PubChem Compound and Substance databases can be found in the 2016 Nucleic Acids Research Database issue.  It provides an overview of the two databases, including data organization, contents, interfaces, programmatic access and other relevant tools and services.  To learn about this and other recent PubChem publications, read this post (http://1.usa.gov/23cAKqS).

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The PubChem BioAssay Record page is now available, which complements a recent revamp of the PubChem Compound Summary page and the Substance Record page.  It features mobile-friendly interface, improved data table, extended download functionality and so on.  To learn more about the BioAssay Record page, please read this post (http://1.usa.gov/1P6phEr).

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PubChem introduces a “legacy” designation.  It helps users separate collections that are no longer maintained.  To learn more about the legacy designation, read this post (http://1.usa.gov/1H52gyW).
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