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BOB DYLAN - CYNTHIA GOODING RADIO SHOW 1962

WBAI Studios
New York City, New York
13 January 1962
Cynthia Gooding radio show.

http://www.bjorner.com/DSN00150%201962.htm#DSN00145

Full Transcript here:

http://expectingrain.com/dok/int/gooding.html

Hear all the tracks:

1. Lonesome Whistle Blues (Hank Williams/Jimmy Davies)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmZAfw4SPOU&feature=related

2. Fixin' To Die (Bukka White)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLvLu_dsGyQ&feature=related

3. Smokestack Lightning (Howlin' Wolf)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ZuFS2WoJYk

4. Hard Travelin' (Woody Guthrie)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUw1c_0RLW8&feature=related

5. The Death Of Emmett Till

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVKTx9YlKls&feature=related

6. Standing On The Highway

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=npzYWD7YtYU&feature=related

7. Roll On, John (trad., arr. By Bob Dylan)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9MCXJuG3KA&feature=related

8. Stealin', Stealin' (trad. arr. Memphis Jug Band)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozkG7g6Zd5Q&feature=related

9. Long Time Man (trad., arr. by Alan Lomax)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCE1kr17Sa0&feature=related

10. Baby Please Don't Go (Big Joe Williams)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHoFaZEfhYw&feature=related

11. Hard Times In New York Town

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_lM_ePgwlM

Harmonica talk. etc: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lH7NsRnwtfA&feature=related

==========

When Bob Dylan wrote 'Hard Times In New York Town' it was based on the melody and structure of 'Down on Penny's Farm' by The Bently Boys.

Hear the Bently Boys here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mX3MQzSFq-Y

There is a brilliant blog with the history of the song as well as a downloadable link to a plethora of different versions (including Dylan's rewrite):

http://oldweirdamerica.wordpress.com/category/down-on-pennys-farm-by-the-bently-boys/

And here is a great video from the above blog. A vintage BBC clip from the 'Tonight' show in 1960. It has an article introduced by a rather stuffy Alan Whicker, talking about the horrors and plight of locals in Newquay England who didn't like the British Beatniks hanging around. The clip opens with Wiz Jones singing his parody of Penny's Farm... Hard times in Newquay 1960 if you've got long hair!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDsQSOf6_ow

===

Original thread not visible to some people:

https://plus.google.com/b/114972365014876681245/114972365014876681245/posts/YxJGjSuqRGS
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Thank you very much! I searched long this record (with Cynthia Gooding).
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John Wilcock: Bob Dylan and the First Published News Photo of a Burning American Flag

From the comic book biography of underground writer and publisher John Wilcock, by Ethan Persoff and Scott Marshall.

http://www.ep.tc/john-wilcock/

"John Wilcock (born August 4, 1927 in Sheffield, England) is a British journalist known for his work in the underground press, as well as his travel guide books.

"One of the five co-founders of the New York Village Voice, Wilcock shook up staid publishing in the USA. His influences extended to several continents, including Australia and the United Kingdom, where — in his mild-mannered way — he pushed the boundaries of image and speech. An unsung hero of the sixties, Wilcock also served three years as a travel editor at The New York Times."

John Wilcock's Wikipedia entry is here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wilcock

The print copy of the comic book biography (volume 1) is available:

http://www.blurb.com/b/6775601-john-wilcock-new-york-years-book-one

Persoff, Ethan, and Scott Marshall. John Wilcock: New York Years, 1954-1971. , 2015. 9781364572877

http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/936571246
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It's great, I love Bob Dylan. 
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Patti Smith, animated interview with Mick Gold.

The interview took place on May 10, 1976, inside the Portobello Hotel in London. Mick was in the room with a few other journalists–those are some of the other voices you hear. “Patti was friendly and weird and talkative,” Mick told us.

“Her appearance is as unlikely as you expect,” Mick wrote of Patti Smith back in ’76. “Hair like a black mop falls across an almost Mongolian face. … A grin like a split. A nose like a moon.”

http://blankonblank.org/interviews/patti-smith-censorship-horses-bob-dylan-poetry

======

“My whole most wonderful memory of Dylan was that I was sitting there, and I was trying to be cool ’cause I knew he was there. He came in the room and he said, ‘Hi Patti’. I just thought that was the neatest thing, that’s all he said. I said hi and then we didn’t know what to say to each other and we’re both like really shy, it was real teenager.”

“It was like when you have a crush on a guy in high school, you know, and you’re waiting for him to talk to you and you stand in front of your locker during class change. All of a sudden he comes up and talks to you and you don’t have nothing to say, and you both stand there. After waiting a year from him to come up and talk to you, he finally comes up and then you’re both like just acting totally creepy and stupid. It was so adolescent, it was really sexy, it was like we were both sixteen.” --Patti Smith

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKbCc0XKj8A
The one and only Patti Smith in a rarely heard interview from 1976 on her inspirations, poetry, Bob Dylan and fuckin' shit. And it's animated.
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BOB DYLAN - CYNTHIA GOODING RADIO SHOW 1962

WBAI Studios
New York City, New York
13 January 1962
Cynthia Gooding radio show.

http://www.bjorner.com/DSN00150%201962.htm#DSN00145

Full Transcript here:

http://expectingrain.com/dok/int/gooding.html

Hear all the tracks:

1. Lonesome Whistle Blues (Hank Williams/Jimmy Davies)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmZAfw4SPOU&feature=related

2. Fixin' To Die (Bukka White)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLvLu_dsGyQ&feature=related

3. Smokestack Lightning (Howlin' Wolf)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ZuFS2WoJYk

4. Hard Travelin' (Woody Guthrie)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUw1c_0RLW8&feature=related

5. The Death Of Emmett Till

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVKTx9YlKls&feature=related

6. Standing On The Highway

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=npzYWD7YtYU&feature=related

7. Roll On, John (trad., arr. By Bob Dylan)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9MCXJuG3KA&feature=related

8. Stealin', Stealin' (trad. arr. Memphis Jug Band)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozkG7g6Zd5Q&feature=related

9. Long Time Man (trad., arr. by Alan Lomax)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCE1kr17Sa0&feature=related

10. Baby Please Don't Go (Big Joe Williams)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHoFaZEfhYw&feature=related

11. Hard Times In New York Town

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_lM_ePgwlM

Harmonica talk. etc: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lH7NsRnwtfA&feature=related

==========

When Bob Dylan wrote 'Hard Times In New York Town' it was based on the melody and structure of 'Down on Penny's Farm' by The Bently Boys.

Hear the Bently Boys here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mX3MQzSFq-Y

There is a brilliant blog with the history of the song as well as a downloadable link to a plethora of different versions (including Dylan's rewrite):

http://oldweirdamerica.wordpress.com/category/down-on-pennys-farm-by-the-bently-boys/

And here is a great video from the above blog. A vintage BBC clip from the 'Tonight' show in 1960. It has an article introduced by a rather stuffy Alan Whicker, talking about the horrors and plight of locals in Newquay England who didn't like the British Beatniks hanging around. The clip opens with Wiz Jones singing his parody of Penny's Farm... Hard times in Newquay 1960 if you've got long hair!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDsQSOf6_ow
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Forever young he is!
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STOP THE CLOUDS

A review of Barney Hoskyns’ new book, ‘Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, the Band, Van Morrison, and Friends in the Wild Years of Woodstock’.

Isis 
Issue 184 
February/March 2016 
pages 35-36
Written by Tara Zuk

http://tarazuk.yolasite.com/

‘Small Town Talk’ by Barney Hoskyns is a love story. For Woodstock is not merely a town in upstate New York; here it is a living and breathing character brought to life. It has a personality of its own. It is organic. It grows, matures and changes with the different fashions and eras.  

Bob Dylan once told Robert Shelton that Woodstock was ‘the greatest place’ and that “…we could stop the clouds, turn time back and inside out, make the sun turn on and off.”

This is what Hoskyns appears to have achieved in his well-written, detailed and warm biography of a remarkable place. He plays with time, drawing us backwards and forwards in a semi-linear style. The past and the present intertwine. The intriguing life stories and adventures of key players in the history of Woodstock are explored in the same way a tourist might wander off the beaten track on the lower slopes of Overlook Mountain; constantly winding upwards to the pinnacle for the overarching view, but with time to stop and absorb the details of the formative rock structures and the subtle changes in flora and fauna along the journey.

The good, the bad and the eccentric are treated with equal respect and an underlying fondness. Every player in the story has a perspective to be related. Every twist in the tale is driven by motive and opportunity, inspiration and artistry, power and money.

Describing itself in the blurb as, ‘a socio-cultural-musical history of the iconic upstate New York locale of Woodstock,’ Hoskyns’ book is primarily about the story of the Woodstock artistic community in the years following the arrival of Albert and Sally Grossman to Bearsville, but it is much more layered, nuanced and human than the by-line suggests. These are ‘magical times in a magical place’. Culture and history is being formed and influenced.

Artists, artisans, craftsmen, musicians, writers, photographers and poets are amongst those who have been drawn to Woodstock over the years. From the power of Overlook Mountain - with its spectacular views and talk of ancient burial grounds - to the Karma bka' brgyud Tibetan Buddhist community, and the ‘new age’ dabblers who consider Woodstock to be located on a spiritually profound ley line; the creative, the artistic, the unconventional misfits, and the contemplative have all been moved to gather in the neighbourhood.

Contributors to Hoskyns’ book repeatedly talk of mystical creative vibrations, karma, and the sense of peace that people often find in Woodstock - which is precisely the escape and refreshment that the overloaded minds of stressed celebrity artists have been seeking in more recent times, away from the urban spotlight.

And yet, Woodstock is a place of contradictions that Hoskyns is determined to investigate.

In the book’s prologue, following the author’s failed attempts to contact Sally Grossman, and preceding a furtive drive past the ‘No Trespassing’ warnings for a foray along the driveway to catch a glimpse of the Grossman Bearsville property, Artie Traum tells Barney Hoskyns, “There’s a veil of secrecy around all this stuff,” adding, “But one of the whole things Dylan started was ‘Don’t talk to anybody.’”  

It is a dissonance that anyone who has lived in a small town may understand. The halcyon outward appearance of tranquility and a close-knit community often conceals an undercurrent of scandal, resentment, old grudges, paranoia, and a desperate attempt by public figures to retain their privacy in an environment where everybody seems to know (or wants to know) everyone else’s business.

The book accurately reflects the contrast between the dark and light. The veneer of a gentle country idyll in the mountains, where people go to seek peace and inspiration, conceals a place with dark and shadowy corners. Drug use, substance abuse, prostitution, fear, distrust, and those gated, high-fenced, properties. Hoskyns mentions, for example, how Bob Dylan became less at ease in Woodstock over time, especially as news of the Charles Manson murders hit the international headlines. Being stalked up those lonely, dark mountain roads by fans willing to hide out in trees overlooking your private space. People invading your property and home, desperate to get some contact with the mysterious idol of the age. The tranquility of Woodstock was transitory. It had become the ‘place of chaos’ Dylan describes in Chronicles.  

It is interesting that the generally more politically conservative population of a small and sleepy, somewhat cloistered, bolt-hole, has opened its arms over the years, and embraced the more liberal, bohemian, and outré of newcomers with (mostly) a modicum of grace and harmony -- despite the occasional friction regarding public nudity and alcohol.

Even Bob Dylan fell into that contradictory area between progressive and conservative. Bruce Dorfman recounts to Hoskyns how in 1968, Dylan expressed support for George Wallace, the pro-segregation governor of Alabama who ran for president. As Dorfman puts it, “He was a small-town kid, and a lot of his thinking politically was quite conservative.” How serious was Dylan? Hoskyns adds a wry footnote. During his iconic photo session at Hi Lo Ha, Elliott Landy was told the same thing by Dylan, about supporting Wallace. When Landy later ran into Richard Manuel and asked whether Dylan was on the level, Richard is said to have replied with a chuckle, “I don’t know, you can never tell with Bob if he is serious or not.”

So were these opinions genuine or part of the Woodstock pastime of  building an image? Dorfman’s recollections are continued by Hoskyns.  

Affectation or not, Dylan took his country-boy act to such an extreme that when he needed a new suit, he asked Dorfman to accompany him to Sears, Roebuck in Kingston. “He had this big truck, and he put Buster in the back,” Dorfman recalls. “At Sears he found a horrendous green suit with saddle-stitched collars and pockets. He thought it was terrific, and I don’t think he was making it up. Innocence gets shattered at some point, but then it comes right back again.” When Dylan showed the suit to Sara -- who in her hippie-maternal way was quite chic -- she smiled. “She said, ‘That’s a lovely suit, Bob,”” says Dorfman. 'She just tolerated this stuff in a bemused way.' 

And then we see maybe the deepest irony of all: the men who forged the first semblance of the modern day incarnation of Woodstock were overtly anti-semitic. For example, Woodstock was a place where, in the opening years of the twentieth century, Ralph Radcliffe Whitehead had arrived looking for a sanctuary away from the Jewish migration to resorts in the Catskills. He might not have believed that six decades later, his son Peter Whitehead was the person who sold Bob Dylan Hi Lo Ha (without comment on a Whitehead selling Woodstock land and property to a Zimmerman - and it is hoped by Hoskyns that the son had evolved far enough from his father’s ‘ingrained prejudice’ for it not to have mattered or been an issue).

Indeed, it is maybe the most delicious incongruity that the modern phenomenon of the near mythical status of Woodstock in today’s culture, language and music, was brought about primarily by the power, influence, and vision of two Jewish men.

Albert Grossman and Bob Dylan.

There are countless others who have played significant roles in establishing and maintaining the reputation of the Woodstock area. The book is full to the brim with their stories, anecdotes and recollections - either from personal reminiscence, or through gathered writings and interviews.

And yet, Grossman and Dylan are the two pillars, the walls and roof of this modern history of Woodstock.

Hoskyns provides ample detail about Albert Grossman’s fascinating biography and influence. There are plenty of stories, anecdotes and facts to inform and entertain those interested in the background of Bob Dylan’s connection to Woodstock. In fact, Grossman and Dylan weave through every section of the book in one way or another. Sometimes solid entities with active roles, sometimes no more than smoke and mist curling around the legs of the players and silently pushing them forward.  

Janis Joplin, The Band, a lovely insight into Levon Helm’s later years before his passing, Van Morrison, Todd Rundgren, Paul Butterfield, Jimi Hendrix… far too many iconic performers and celebrities are included in the book to be listed here. They explode into the narrative and then are gone, with their stories all interconnected.

And, of course, some pages are dedicated to that elephant in the room - the Woodstock music and arts festival, that “Aquarian Exposition: 3 Days of Peace & Music” which took place in August 1969. The book shows how Woodstock and ‘The Woodstock Festival’ are not synonymous in either spirit or in location (the festival being held 69 kilometres southwest of Woodstock, near White Lake, Bethel). In fact, for many people ‘The Woodstock Festival’ irreparably and negatively changed the town of Woodstock. Many shared Bob Dylan’s distaste for the idea, and it was unsurprising when Dylan himself opted to perform at the Isle of Wight festival in the UK in the summer of 1969, rather than attend the festivities in Bethel.  

‘Small Town Talk’ includes 16 pages of black and white photographs that are unfortunately rather small and not always as clearly reproduced as one would like. However they do serve to illustrate much of the important historical content of the book.   

With a solid bibliography, thorough notes on quotations and sources, and even a small playlist suggestion that takes any readers unfamiliar with the performers in the book on a musical tour of Woodstock from 1968 - 2010, this book is informative, entertaining and eminently readable.

Certainly, ‘Small Town Talk’ has neatly caught the significance, the atmosphere, the characters, and the social history of Woodstock. Although it is geared for the more general cultural and musical history enthusiast, and much of the information is covered in other books, this is a fine addition to the library of anyone interested in the music of Bob Dylan. It includes the stories of some of the people surrounding Dylan and working with him during the 1960s and early 1970s, with openness and touches of humour, offering more in content and approach than a standard celebrity biography.   

‘Small Town Talk’ by Barney Hoskyns (hardcover, 380 pages) is due to be released through Da Capo Press, March 15th 2016.

Hoskyns, Barney. Small Town Talk: Bob Dylan, the Band, Van Morrison, and Friends in the Wild Years of Woodstock. Boston : Da Capo, 2016. 9780306823206

(c) Tara Zuk, 2016
All Rights Reserved
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+Ron Chester originally shared:

https://plus.google.com/b/114972365014876681245/+RonChester/posts/e9CrDedtQ4d  
Eileen Aroon
Traditional
Performed 30 June 1988 by Bob Dylan

This is a good one to play for wooden eared friends who have swallowed the media incantation, "Dylan can't sing." Don't let them get up or leave the room until you've replayed it a few times. If they still don't get it, kick them out and tell them to go get some scratchy Caruso 78's. Lock the door on their way out. --Ron Chester

http://www.justanothertune.com/html/eileenaroon.html
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Bob Dylan experiments with the moustache look in 1966

Frivolous holiday weekend post. ;-)

Re-watching 'Eat The Document' today, and I noticed the scene where Dylan paints a pencil moustache on himself in front of the mirror. It is a style that he has apparently been planning since 1966.

See the scene here, at the 12'40" mark of the film:

https://youtu.be/iJWWEjyqI68?t=12m40s

The first picture in my post is a pair of screenshots from the movie, showing Bob Dylan trying out the moustache look. The second picture in the post is a photograph taken by David Gahr in November 2001, under the Holy Mackerel sign, Brooklyn.

http://popspotsnyc.com/pip_love_and_theft/index.html
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Bob Dylan and Bill Murray

In the 2014 American comedy-drama film 'St. Vincent', Bill Murray closes the credits with an improvised and touching scene where he potters around his back yard; smoking, watering a dead plant with a US flag upon display, and singing along with Bob Dylan's song 'Shelter From The Storm' (1976, Blood On The Tracks).

You can watch the scene here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dgz88voETRM

'St. Vincent' Wikipedia page:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Vincent_(film)

Glenn Whipp in the LA Times wrote about how the scene came about:

"Yes, we know: Nobody sings Dylan like Dylan, but in his new movie, "St. Vincent," Bill Murray performs a pretty wonderful version of "Shelter From the Storm" over the closing credits.

You can watch a version of Murray's work with this video, though the full performance, which cuts between two takes, runs through the entirety of the movie's closing credits. It should all but guarantee that no one will leave this film before the lights go up.

When we spoke earlier to "St. Vincent" writer-director Ted Melfi, he revealed that he had originally planned to end the movie with an elaborate shot involving special effects but then came to think that it was too much of a manipulative "Hollywood" moment. So he asked Murray: What if you just went out to the backyard and sang a song?

"It was 'Shelter From the Storm' from the start," Melfi says. "I love it. It's Harvey Weinstein's [whose company is releasing the movie] favorite song. I tell Bill, and he says, 'Well, that's one of my favorite songs of all time.' So it's kismet.""

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/goldstandard/la-et-mn-bill-murray-shelter-storm-dylan-st-vincent-video-20141010-story.html

Other links between Bill Murray and Bob Dylan...

Bob Dylan and Bill Murray were both guests on the final David Letterman Late Show on May 19, 2015:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDTl2524pAk

The Bill Murray movie Rock The Kasbah (2015) uses Bob Dylan's '*Knockin On Heaven's Door*' for a battle scene in Afghanistan. The clip can be seen in parts at the following link:

https://www.getyarn.io/yarn-clip/29a92144-fb41-4c78-a062-727a3ac9917c

'Rock The Kasbah' Wikipedia page:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_the_Kasbah_(film)

Hunter S. Thompson

Bob Dylan played the Janus Jazz Festival in Aspen, Colorado on September 1, 2002.

http://www.bjorner.com/DSN24040%20-%202002%20US%20Summer%20Tour.htm#DSN24260

Hunter S. Thompson had a home in Aspen, and Bob Dylan was photographed with Thompson. Of course, Hunter S. Thompson had dedicated his book 'Fear And Loathing in Las Vegas' to Bob Dylan and arranged to have 'Mr. Tambourine Man' played at his funeral. It is said that Thompson and Dylan knew each other from Greenwich Village in the 1960s, and there are many connections and correlations between the two men.

A picture of Bob and Hunter in 2002:

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/e4/b6/7c/e4b67cc9005247c909a34d8ae0d679a5.jpg

Bill Murray had played the role of Hunter S. Thompson in the 1980 movie '_Where The Buffalo Roam_'. This was a semi-autobiographical comedy film about Thompson's rise to fame in the 1970s. Murray became close to Thompson on set, they had a rivalry and Murray managed to capture the 'gonzo' journalist's mannerisms for the movie to an uncanny degree, even though the movie was not a critical success.

Original Soundtrack of 'Where the Buffalo Roam'

http://www.allmusic.com/album/where-the-buffalo-roam-mw0000962452

'Where The Buffalo Roam' Wikipedia page:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Where_the_Buffalo_Roam

Bill Murray with Hunter S. Thompson:

https://www.reddit.com/r/OldSchoolCool/comments/4s8kln/hunter_s_thompson_and_bill_murray_at_sea_1980/

And don't fall for the photoshopped pictures - they were wearing matching 'Amazing X Navy' t-shirts in the original shots. ;-)
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A collection of illustrations by Megan Gilbert.

They accompany the review of Bob Dylan's album Tempest by Patrick Gilbert, 2012-11-02:

http://www.themediares.com/pages/artifacts/1969.html

Each illustration takes either a concept (a cool Shakespeare figure, watching the 'Tempest' of his own play) or a line from a song.

Megan Gilbert's site:

http://megan-gilbert.com/
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Blank On Blank animated transcript

http://blankonblank.org/interviews/bob-dylan-freak-shows-folk-music-songs-smoking-greenwich-village-coffee-houses-song-writing/#read-more

"This interview originally aired on WBAI FM in New York City in February of 1962. Dylan was 20 at the time and it was his first appearance on the Folksingers Choice radio show. We uncovered this recording in the Pacifica Radio Archives.

"Dylan played songs throughout the recording, including some of his own (“The Death of Emmett Till”, “Standing on the Highway”) and covers of songs by Howlin’ Wolf, Hank Williams, and Woody Guthrie. We scored the episode with Dylan tuning up his guitar and playing his harmonica. Listen to the full interview below.

"After the animated section of this episode, we’ve also included an excerpt of Dylan talking about his songwriting process from another of Pacifica’s interviews, which was also recorded in 1962."

See Also:

https://plus.google.com/114972365014876681245/posts/2RwCTLsTZYT
"I'm never going to become rich and famous." Bob Dylan was still largely an unknown back in 1962. That's when he stopped by a radio studio in New York City.
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Bob Dylan interview with Philippe Adler for L'Express magazine, June 16,1978.

Royal Garden Hotel, Kensington, London UK. 

Article published in L'Express, 3 July 1978. 

Complete interview can be read here:

http://dvdylanjim50reviews.yolasite.com/resources/Reference%20(1).pdf#page=643

And the interview is in Olof Björner's list of 1970s interviews:

http://www.bjorner.com/Interviews_70s.pdf#page=77

These photographs were potentially taken on June 16, 1978. Bob Dylan was in London June 13 - 20 (1978) and stayed at the Royal Garden Hotel, Kensington. These photographs were taken in his hotel suite, and one of them was used as the cover photograph for the L'Express interview, "Bob Dylan Parle". As the interview also took place in Dylan's hotel suite, and the pictures do look almost 'photoshoot' staged, it seems a good bet. 

The photographs are not referenced online very clearly - and so any help with identifying them would be appreciated. As would any additions to the album. 

The interview with Philippe Adler was mentioned by Robert Shelton when he interviewed Bob Dylan in Kensington later that same week. Shelton's interview was published in Melody Maker on July 29, 1978.

http://www.expectingrain.com/dok/int/shelton1978.07.29.html

Philippe Adler's Wikipedia entry:

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippe_Adler 

===
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Danny Kalb and Bob Dylan

Photograph: Bob Dylan with Mark Spoelstra, Danny Kalb and Gil Turner (courtesy of Alice Ochs)

From Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danny_Kalb 

"Danny Kalb (born September 9, 1942, Mount Vernon, New York, United States) is an American blues guitarist and vocalist, and was one of the original members of the 1960s group, Blues Project.

"Kalb was a protégé of Dave Van Ronk, and became a solo performer, as well as a session musician with such folk singers as Judy Collins, Phil Ochs, Pete Seeger and Bob Dylan. Kalb and Sam Charters formed The New Strangers. He joined Van Ronk's Ragtime Jug Stompers. Inspired by the African American bluesmen Son House, Skip James and Mississippi John Hurt, Kalb experimented with acoustic and electronic music. In 1965 Kalb joined with Steve Katz and, Andy Kulberg, Roy Blumenfeld and Tommy Flanders to form The Blues Project."

Danny Kalb's Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/Danny-Kalb-142508552482679/timeline

"Always a powerful guitarist." - Bob Dylan

==========

http://www.bobdylanroots.com/kalb.html

DANNY KALB:
"I'd got my version of 'Poor Lazarus' from Dave van Ronk and I shared it with Bob Dylan in the kitchen of Fred Underhill's house in Madison. He'd learned that from me, although my version was really based on Dave van Ronk's."

Mitch Blank, A Conversation with Danny Kalb, The Telegraph, No. 47, Winter 1993, p. 53.

==========

Bob Dylan performed with Danny Kalb at the Riverside Church Folk Music Hootenanny, WRVR-FM, new York, NY, Jul 29, 1961:

http://www.bjorner.com/DSN00020%201961.htm#DSN00060

12-hour Hootenanny Special: Saturday Of Folk Music
 
1. Handsome Molly (trad.)
2. Naomi Wise (trad.)
3. Poor Lazarus (trad.)
4. Mean Old Southern Railroad (Danny Kalb)
5. Acne (Eric von Schmidt)
 
1 Bob Dylan (vocal & guitar).
2–5  Bob Dylan (harmonica).
4  Danny Kalb (vocal).
5  Bob Dylan and Ramblin’ Jack Elliott (shared vocal).

Transcript of the performance, by Manfred Helfert: 

http://www.bobdylanroots.com/river.html

ANNOUNCER:
We're going to go back to our regular folk program and bring you now a fellow who's been around the New York area for about a year. He also performs in various coffeehouses. He plays the harmonica, he sings a lot of songs by Woody Guthrie, sings a lot of his own material. He comes from Gallup, New Mexico --- Bobby Dylan.

DYLAN (while tuning his guitar):
...Came sorta up here in a hurry... don' know what to do...

DYLAN PERFORMS "HANDSOME MOLLY."

DYLAN (while tuning):
...This harmonica holder isn't holding too good together... came back... it's gonna strangle me here... it's just a hanger, coat hanger...

DYLAN PERFORMS "OMIE WISE."

DYLAN (while tuning):
...Huh ...sing you one of Woody Guthrie's songs... ...no ...anybody got a knife? ...got a knife? Any one of you people got a knife? No? ...well, that sure ain't a big knife...(?) ...show you a little trick...
(TRIES FRETTING GUITAR WITH KNIFE)
Oh... ...got a bigger knife?

(AUDIENCE LAUGHTER)

...That wasn't the trick... ok... ...oh... ok...huh? Oh, good! ...I really ain't no comedian...

ANNOUNCER:
I wish you could... we had television. Bobby, in case you haven't guessed by now, plays the guitar and plays the harmonica at the same time. Now, that's a bit of a trick. If you have a harmonica holder, it isn't too bad. Bobby doesn't have a harmonica holder, the poor kid... and right now, he's using a coat hanger...

DYLAN:
I sold 'em...

ANNOUNCER:
...and his coat hanger is not bending right. If he could bend his coat hanger musically, it'd be more entertaining, but he can't...

DYLAN:
...Thanks, no...
(BLOWS HARMONICA)

ANNOUNCER
Are you ready?

DYLAN
Yeah, I think so.
(CHUCKLES; BLOWS HARMONICA)
Well, here's one... (TUNING)

ANNOUNCER
All right, this gives me a good opportunity to read this little piece of paper which they've given me...They've decided that instead of me signaling to this fellow over here with six earphones on his head... that I'm gonna read the station breaks. So, in case you didn't know it, you're listening to folk music all day today... and harmonica bending... over Riverside Radio, WRVR, 106.7 FM, New York City.

DYLAN (BLOWS HARMONICA):
...Ok...

ANNOUNCER
Would someone volunteer to hold this thing up to Bobby's mouth while he's playing?

DYLAN PERFORMS "POOR LAZARUS."

DYLAN
This... this is a friend of mine -- Danny Kalb. He plays the guitar... sings... Gonna play harmonica...

DANNY KALB AND DYLAN PERFORM "MEAN OLD SOUTHERN RAILROAD."

ANNOUNCER
Thank you, Bobby Dylan... and that was Danny Kalb on the last song. Bobby, you forgot your coat hanger...

-- BREAK IN TAPE --

ANNOUNCER
You've been a really wonderful audience and we'd like to bring up one more performer to sing one more song for you -- Bobby Dylan with his new harmonica holder... Bobby? 
I mean, Bruce Langhorne's harmonica holder... Well, it looks like we have another dramatic... uh... entrance...

DYLAN
...sing your part...

RAMBLIN' JACK ELLIOTT
It's Blind Bob...

DYLAN
No...

RAMBLIN' JACK ELLIOTT
Doo wop?

DYLAN
Yeah, man...

BOB DYLAN AND RAMBLIN' JACK ELLIOTT PERFORM "ACNE."

RAMBLIN' JACK ELLIOTT
...I'm s'posed to be at Gerde's Folk City now... I sing there with some other people, but... just couldn't tear myself away... here...

ANNOUNCER
Oh, great... Thanks a lot, Jack...
Jack Elliott and Bob Dylan.

SHOUTS FROM AUDIENCE: 
More... more...

ANNOUNCER
Do you believe in democracy?

RAMBLIN' JACK ELLIOTT
All good things, you know...

ANNOUNCER
...come to an end.

RAMBLIN' JACK ELLIOTT: ...must come to an end.

-- END OF TAPE --

==========

Mean Old Southern Railroad: 

http://www.bobdylanroots.com/mean.html

Lyrics as performed by Danny Kalb (vocal / guitar) and Bob Dylan (harmonica), transcribed by Manfred Helfert: 

Oh, that mean old Southern Railroad,
Yes, it took my babe away. 
Oh, that mean old railroad
Took my babe away. 
I'm gonna find her, yes, I'll find her, 
Gonna bring her back some day.
Now, that mean old Southern Railroad, 
Yes, it took my babe away. 
Yes, that mean old railroad
Took my babe away. 
Gonna find my baby, 
Find her, yes, some day.

Caught you standin' on the corner, 
With the feet gettin' wet, 
Yeah, standin' on the corner, 
Her feet soakin' wet. 
Yeah, she's beggin' each and
Every man she met.

Oh, that mean old Southern Railroad, 
Yes, it took my babe away. 
Oh, that mean old railroad
Took my babe away. 
Gonna find her, yes, I'll find her, 
I'm gonna bring her back some day.

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Hear the performance here: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X07iHjrdZR0

Danny Kalb and Bob Dylan - Mean Old Southern Railroad (Riverside Church NYC, July 1961)

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