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Enrico Tagliavini
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Enrico Tagliavini

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I just made a big mistake. Tried Ubuntu 16.04. The situation with the NVIDIA proprietary driver is awful to say the least. Ubuntu used to be good decent with proprietary drivers, but it turns out they are breaking their setup more and more.

If you want to use NVIDIA proprietary drivers my advise it to avoid Ubuntu
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Enrico Tagliavini

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Can we stop for a second and look at how silly the mobile phone situation is for Android?

Let's do a very quick comparison for a second: computers vs. mobile phones.

When you go to a shop you buy a computer, vast majority is x86 based. You can also buy a copy of Windows (even if this is usually bundled) and you can install it. If you don't like Windows you can try Linux, of very few other options. If it's Apple you have one more option: MacOS.

In other words a very limited number of Operating System (Windows, Linux, MacOS, but in BSD if you want) will run, unmodified, on the device you just purchased. At most you need to install few additional drivers by hand and that's it. But yet again the driver is usually the same, it doesn't depend on the Brand of the device you are installing it on. For example: you download the nvidia driver and it works on Dell, HP, Asus, Lenovo etc, as long as you have an nvidia card.

Now you buy a mobile phone. Let's focus on non Apple hardware for a second since Apple case is just a very particular one (for the bad and the good). Usually you have very little, if any, possibility to just install your own Operating System on the device if you lack the very custom parts the vendor is putting in.

It's not a mere problem of missing device drivers (which is anyway a big one) or locked devices. The problem is the fundamental different approach to Operating Systems in phones. One of the problem is certainly the very unfriendly CPU architecture: ARM. ARM lacks one very nice feature of x86: if you build an x86 kernel it will run on any freaking x86 based computer on this planet, doesn't matter the vendor (AMD vs. Intel mainly). ARM on the other side is a scattered cluster f*ck. Sometimes even two different CPUs from the same vendor cannot use the same kernel! Now there is effort in the Linux kernel to reduce this problem, but it's very far away from being solved.

Regardless of the (in my humble opinion retarded) reasons, the fact is that every single phone vendor has to do a lot of work and put a lot of effort to build up a quality software for their product. The non shared part of the work is quite high. The race for the most custom UI is another side of it.

Now let's move to the Utopia: can phone vendors please stop pretending being Operating Systems vendors and do phones only? Android is for the most part still an open source project. Instead of moving to close it up (a warring recent tendency), can we actually move towards a more PC like system, where Android is just an OS and you can install it on you phone and you can update it without waiting for the phone vendor? Needless to say this really open Android project should not be driven by any of the vendor (or by all of them together).

What I'm thinking is basically like cyanogenmod, for all models. All of them. Now some help is needed from manufactures and ARM as a start, to make it easier. Also device drivers need to either become open or become nvidia-like. Since the latter takes a humongous effort, I highly recommend the former for the best result.

At least security updates would be granted and a lot of this mess could be avoided.
First detected in November, Shedun/HummingBad infections are surging.
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Just used this yesterday
http://myzen.asus.com/2015/10/13/official-bootloader-unlock-for-zenfone-2-is-now-available/
for get access to the operating system using "credible" tools.

and this for install twrp
https://github.com/TeamWin/twrpme

but didn't use super su



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Enrico Tagliavini

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Now I'm looking forward to check out RUST :)
 
New blog post. 
I think Rust is extremely well-suited for low level Linux systems userspace programming — daemons, services, command-line tools, that sort of thing. Low-level userspace code on Linux is almost universally written in C — until one gets to a certain point where it's acceptable for Python to be ...
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Enrico Tagliavini

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One of the reasons I massively dislike stuff like rubygems and mvn. Or even docker when you pull a random container instead of spinning your own.
 
Hilarious and sad.. Also predictable. Pulling code from random git repos (and package systems are little more than that) is not a sustainable practice. It will die. 
In this blog post I will show how: 17000 computers were forced to execute arbitrary code by typosquatting programming language packages/libraries 50% of these installations were conducted with administrative rights Even highly security aware institutions (.gov and .mil hosts) fell victim to this attack a typosquatting attack becomes wormable by mining the command history data of hosts some good defenses against typosquatting package managers migh...
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Enrico Tagliavini

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I wonder if we are doing another human error: quantum computer starts to be a thing and it might be asymmetric cryptography as we know it today (and used by GPG/PGP, ssh, https) is actually broken... and, to my best knowledge, we still need to invent an alternative
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Enrico Tagliavini

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Well that's a bummer. I was looking forward for Intel powered mobile devices given I highly dislike the free software unfriendly ARM.

Hopefully something else will come up in the future.... while I would be glad ARM becoming a bit more friendly (given their success is anyway based on free software products in the first place) I highly doubt it will ever happen.
 
http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Intel-Cans-Broxton Broxton was to be Intel's 2016 Atom SoC platform for phones and tablets. Broxton was to be using 14nm Goldmont CPU cores and Skylake graphics, but now it's no more.
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Enrico Tagliavini

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Agreed with the conclusion. More than 1 GB for Libreoffice is insane. Clear with Libreoffice you are lucky the distro provides it so the solution is easy there. But this just shows how much this system doesn't scale. Which is good, it can't go too far away, it's there and it's useful for some use case where the mainstream solution doesn't work for one reason or another.

That being said I'm looking at flatpaks as well. If I understood correctly the (multiple) runtime(s) are shared. For Libreoffice you need to install the GNOME 3.20 runtime and I assume that if I install another flatpak requiring GNOME 3.20 the one libreoffice uses is going to be good and not downloaded again. That sounds interesting, very interesting.

But just to be clear: package managers as we know them now (dnf, portage, apt, pacman and so on). should never go away and should still be your primary source for software. For corner cases or when they fall short -> flatpaks.
 
http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=ubuntu-snaps-fedora&num=1  I had a bit of a surprise waiting for me as I walked out of lunch today: Ubuntu's snapper packaging utility had accepted the necessary patches to work on non-Ubuntu distros. The list of supported distributions now includes Arch, Gentoo, Debian, and Fedora.
Phoronix is the leading technology website for Linux hardware reviews, open-source news, Linux benchmarks, open-source benchmarks, and computer hardware tests.
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+Thomas Pfeiffer yeah I saw this [1] very cool. Thank you for confirming the runtime is shared. I thought so by looking at libreoffice instructions for flatpak, they say to install the gnome 3.20 runtime (for much improved gtk3 backend). If it needs to be installed separately it means it's not part of the pak, thus is likely to be shared.

[1] http://www.proli.net/2016/02/24/kde-applications-on-xdg-app/
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That's probably the essential reason why I love Linux distros but will never like something Linux based but powered by an app store like Android: maintainers. Thank you all for your hard work. The past, the present and the future.

That and the fact is free software of course.
Disclaimers, et al. These opinions are not at all related to Arch Linux, though maintaining Arch packages has certainly colored my opinions. I've been a volunteer maintainer for years now, because I feel it helps people. I have a bias towards the value that maintainers and maintaining packages ...
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Kind of amazing. Luckily there is no version of LiveUpdate for the OS I run.

#fixyourshit ASUS!
… my first disclosure. Man, it feels weird doing this. update 6/6/16 I would like to stress something: I’m not saying “Don’t buy an ASUS device” – I see a lot of people who want to lambaste ASUS for...
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Would be a start I guess
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"Software remains a craft rather than a science, relying on the experience of the craftsperson. Like cabinetmakers, we proceed one step at a time, making judgments about what’s important and what isn’t at each step.
[...]
How can we do a better job cutting corners? I think we can learn a lot from people building tables and dressers.
"

Nice article
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Enrico Tagliavini

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Updated my system to #Fedora 22 to Fedora 23 today. WOW! What a painless experience. No really. Two commands, reboot, wait, automatic reboot. Done. About 15 minutes total.

Well done +Fedora Project . That you very much for making the upgrade process better. Now to my gaming laptop.... having quite a more complex setup there since I have custom made (by me) packages for bumblebee and bbswitch. Let's see how it handles with them.
What is DNF system upgrade? dnf-plugin-system-upgrade is a plugin for the dnf package manager which handles system upgrades. It is the recommended upgrade method for Fedora 21 and later. What does DNF system upgrade do? DNF system upgrade can upgrade your system to a newer release of Fedora, ...
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Usually, if you say "linux" people think about a very hard to use OS. But is it true? Is Kubuntu really an OS for developers and nerds? I'm