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David Arnold
Works at Cubberley Library
Lives in Stanford, CA 94305
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David Arnold

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I am having trouble buying into capitalism. I always have, and it has historically caused me quite a few issues. I don't know how to treat money like it's not bullshit, and I don't know how to treat jobs like they're not just modern slavery. Does anyone have any advice?
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David Arnold

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Parrot parents peg their parrotlets with pet names.
 
Many species of animals can recognize each other's voices. For example, if a horse sees another horse it knows walk by, and then hears that horse's whinny, it won't be surprised, but if it then hears a different horse, it will look up and try to figure out what's going on. Many species go beyond this and have "signature contact calls" -- specific patterns of sound they make to identify themselves, the equivalent of saying "I'm Bob! I'm Bob!" And their species-mates can recognize that as their tag.

This new study, by Cornell's Karl Berg, has found that the green-rumped parrotlet goes much farther than this. Not only do individual parrots have these calls, but they can use each other's call signs to identify each other: not merely the equivalent of saying "I'm Bob! I'm Bob!" but saying "Hey Ted! Come here!" And on top of that, these signs aren't innate: they appear to be learned around an age of 3 weeks, and similar to the names of their parents.

Which is to say, these are more than call signs: these are bona-fide names, used by parrots in much the same way we use names ourselves.
"Oh Romeo, oh Romeo," cried Juliet. Being human, she and her boyfriend had names. Is there any other animal that does this? Has names for each other? Oddly enough, yes!
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"Multivariate analysis indicates that economic elites and organized groups representing business interests have substantial independent impacts on U.S. government policy, while average citizens and mass-based interest groups have little or no independent influence. The results provide substantial support for theories of Economic Elite Domination and for theories of Biased Pluralism, but not for theories of Majoritarian Electoral Democracy or Majoritarian Pluralism."

A Princeton/Northwestern University paper on how yep, policy changes and other governmental influence indicators say we are in a plutocracy.
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Adorable baby elephant.
 
Lil baby elephant curling up for a nap
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An interesting workup of the common beliefs of Druids, which are not just a D&D class.
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Have him in circles
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It seems like once nations get to a certain size, and have an economy, this basically always happens: the top percent or so own everything. I am starting to think that this is where the idea of focusing a culture on property gets you.

I would love to hear other opinions on this. Note: it also has happened in countless other nations. A real hoarding problem, if you will.

http://www.businessinsider.com/major-study-finds-that-the-us-is-an-oligarchy-2014-4

#capitalismbecomesoligarchy
The U.S. government does not represent the...
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David Arnold

Introductions  - 
 
I am 31, have been doing the self-help thing since 24, and went from high school dropout to college dropout to full ride scholarship at Stanford. I am now on the project of learning to think and speak clearly. Does anyone have advice?
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+David Arnold Interpersonalizing is best practiced through the art of listening first. Most people enjoy talking about themselves. Women generally speak on an average around 8000 words per day, and men around 2000 words per day. One bit of wisdom that Ive learned communicating with the fairer sex is not to give unwarranted advice if it hasnt been asked for... Women like to know that they are being understood, not coached...
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Apparently, TED and X-Prize are getting together to fund a competition whose goal is to have an artificial intelligence give a TED talk without assistance.
 
Xprize is known for its ambition. The outfit, with the help of some big name (and deep pocketed) partners, has launched initiatives to spur Star Trek-like tricorder development and even get private industry to land a rover on the moon. But now, it's teaming up with TED, that forum for big ideas, to do something a little different. The two companies have just announced an Xprize for Artificial Intelligence and here's the hook: they want the AI to conduct its own TED Talk with no human assist. Mind. Blown. None of this is actually set in stone though and, in fact, the partners are looking to you -- yes, you -- for help in deciding how this all goes down

http://www.engadget.com/2014/03/20/xprize-wants-to-fund-artificial-intelligence-ted-talk/
Xprize is known for its ambition. The outfit, with the help of some big name (and deep pocketed) partners, has launched initiatives to spur Star
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Part of the problem with conceiving of immortality is the fact that we're not even sure if it's ethically right yet, AND it seems like a completely intractable moon-shot type problem where we don't even know what we don't know we need to do it. Aubrey de Grey is great at decomposing this problem into slightly more tractable categories of, broadly, parts of aging to target.

The fact that Google recently bought Calico says that the tech company is probably making a shot at the ultimate problem to solve: human aging.
 
Aubrey de Grey, "Ending Aging" | Talks at Google
Aubrey de Grey has drawn up a roadmap to defeat biological aging. He provocatively proposes that the first human beings who will live to 1,000 years old have already been born. In this talk he describes ongoing research into extending healthy human life, and describes how therapies which can add 30 healthy years to the remaining lifespan of a typical 60-year-old may well arrive in the next few decades.
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David Arnold

General Discussion  - 
 
I'm a little nervous system, short and stout.
Here are my inputs, here are my out.
When I get excited, I can shout:
Because of chains of action potentials wearing me out.
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Have him in circles
89 people
Kyle Schou's profile photo
Britta Hakkila's profile photo
Steven Young's profile photo
Hank Roth's profile photo
Jennifer Swartz's profile photo
Michael Fourdraine's profile photo
Egbert Devin's profile photo
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Currently
Stanford, CA 94305
Previously
Albuquerque, NM - Colorado Springs, CO
Links
Work
Occupation
Work-Study
Skills
Writing, people, thinking, learning.
Employment
  • Cubberley Library
    Library Staff, 2013 - present
    Shelve books, use internal database, assistant web development.
  • Apple Inc.
    Mac Genius, 2006 - 2009
    Repaired relationships and computers, presented the face of Apple.
  • Pikes Peak Community College
    Cluster Leader - volunteer, 2010 - 2011
    Facilitated group learning for a multitude of college courses, from history to chemistry to mathematics.
  • CompUSA
    A+ Certified Technician, 2002 - 2003
    Fixed computers.
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Male